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troubleshoot Centech fuse panel....


Crank

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OK. A R1200RT - 06. I installed the centech fuse panel and the 70amp relay kit today. Everything looks fine, but the fuse panel is not getting power. When I turn on the switch, the relay has a nice little buzz to it that I would assume means that it is getting power from the splice with one of the tail lights - the grey/black wire. Doesn't the buzz mean that the relay switch is on?

 

Any ideas...it's gotta be something simple...maybe? confused.gif

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Normally you can't hear a DC relay once it has turned on. It only makes a click on the initial power up. If you're hearing a buzz it appears that the relay is not getting a steady source of power. It could be either the hot or the ground causing it.

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Allen,

One reason to use a fuse block is to bypass the canbus system.

Try hooking directly to the battery. A better setup IMO.

That should get you going.

Good luck.

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Tim,

 

I will try going direct to the battery tomorrow. At least it will confirm that the fuse box is working fine. I wanted the relay just so it would be switched...but, don't gotta, I guess.

 

Crank

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Kioolt, I made sure the connection from the tail light to the relay was a good one, but it still had a buzzing sound. I'll call Centech on Monday and see if they have any troubleshooting tips. The relay has "China" stamped right on it - it is possible it could be not functioning properly. Strange, constant buzzing/vibration - the tail light should have enough juice to switch the relay. I just read someone else did it and it worked fine. Bravo for them.

 

the brown wires are ground, right? Just double checking.

 

Thanks for your help. thumbsup.gif

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Crank, the problem is with the trigger wire you connected to the positive tail light wire. The tail light voltage is not constant. It is pulsed. That is why the relay is buzzing. Check out this oscilloscope picture courtesy of BimmerEric. He put the tail light wire on an oscilloscope and found that CanBus pulses the voltage on and off rapidly to make the bulb appear dimmer for the tail light function then puts constant full voltage to the bulb for the brake light function. It allow BMW to run only 2 wires to a single filament bulb instead of 3 to a 2 filament bulb. Read this link CanBus pulsed tail light

To get a good trigger source, look at these:

The front parking light positive wire. It comes on with the key and goes off when the key is turned off.

Some have used a wire on the backside of the diagnostic connector (round connector with cap under the drivers seat) with good luck. I think it is green but search these forums for more info.

Another alternative is the violet wire behind the steering head that goes to the radio. It is always on except when the key is turned to the lock position. Nice if you want your accessories to stay on during gas stops. In either case don't power anything other than the relay. Don't connect the accessories to either of these wires. Connect the accessories to the output of the relay.

 

Good luck, Buckster

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Buckster has told me something that I didn't know about the Canbus taillight circuit. He states that he voltage is not constant but is a pulsed DC. That goes along with my statement that a DC relay will not buzz with a steady voltage applied. I believe that if you try what Buckster says you will solve your problem.

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Wow! That resolves that! I had read that someone did use the tail light successfully, but it could have been on a GS or other model.

Well, my "key-on" relay wire is now too short to reach the front parking light (I could patch it). Plus, I hate that I cut my tail light wire, even though the posi-lock works fine with the connection. Should I wrap that posi-lock with elec tape, or is it safe from the elements in the tail light assembly?

 

I will probably look for the diagnostic wire you mention - after I make sure which one it is.

 

buckster, that was very informative - thumbsup.gif

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Personally I would repair the tail light wire by soldering followed by heat shrink tubing. Over the years, I have found because of the water that finds it way into every connector, that corrosion will eventually occur. If you are not able to solder and are going to keep the twist locks, I suggest putting some vaseline on the bare wires and connector ends (inside the twist lock) to slow the corrosion.

I forgot about another trigger wire that would work. The red/grn that goes to the accessory plug ins. There is one stock on the left rear corner of the fairing (above your knee). There is a second accessory plug in available for the left rear side (under the trunk rack). These are on the same circuit. Even if you don't have the plug itself, the red/grn and brn (ground) wires are routed to that area. This red/grn does stay on for about 1 min after the key is turned on. However I understand that if it senses significant current draw (more that a relay coil's draw), it will stay on about 20 mins. I would try it for your application since it is convenient to your Centech.

Buckster

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Heh. Yeah, I can solder. Did some this weekend. My soldering jobs look more like bulging, grotesque artwork. But, it still helps I am sure. And, I dropped the soldering gun and burned my foot, too. So, yeah, I'm pretty good at it. lmao.gif

 

I do have the pillion accessory plug...that'll work great. Buckster, you have been very helpful...thanks.

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Jim VonBaden
Wow! That resolves that! I had read that someone did use the tail light successfully, but it could have been on a GS or other model.

Well, my "key-on" relay wire is now too short to reach the front parking light (I could patch it). Plus, I hate that I cut my tail light wire, even though the posi-lock works fine with the connection. Should I wrap that posi-lock with elec tape, or is it safe from the elements in the tail light assembly?

 

I will probably look for the diagnostic wire you mention - after I make sure which one it is.

 

buckster, that was very informative - thumbsup.gif

 

The new firmware on the R1200 series includes an update to use voltage to both filiments of the tail light. They vary the voltage to get running and brake lights. It makes the bulb effectively brighter. It also screws up anyonw with a Brake LED unit, or using it for other purposes like yours.

 

Here is what I did for mine:

 

relaydiagram.jpg

 

The blue/green wire on the diagnostic plug works fine for powering the relay.

 

01-Fuse-block-tap.jpg

 

No issues in 30K miles on my 05 12GS, and 15K miles on my GF's 05 12ST.

 

Jims-wiring.jpg

 

Tinas-Wiring.jpg

 

Jim cool.gif

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My soldering jobs look more like bulging, grotesque artwork.

 

1) Make good mechanical connection between clean wires (twist them) or to terminal (light crimp)

 

2) Heat iron

 

3) Tin the tip of the iron by touching the solder to it so it is shiny with fresh solder. You can wipe the hot tip clean with a wad of wet paper towel or something if you need to, but if you keep it tinned you should be fine.

 

4) Apply heat to wires with iron tip or to butt of connector if you are soldering on a connector, wait for wires and/ or connector to heat up. This is important. Don't touch it with solder yet.

 

5) Touch solder to the wire joint or to the wire where it enters connector butt. Keep the iron on the other side of the connection as you do this - don't touch the iron with the solder. If it does not melt, take it away, and keep heating joint.

 

6) As solder melts, keep applying it to joint and watch the solder magically wick into connection or into twisted wires. When saturated with solder, remove.

 

7) Admire your work.

 

(If you have a big drip on there or something, you used too much - you can remove it by using a piece of desoldering braid or by just giving the joint a shake over a surface you don't care about hot lead dripping on)

 

The key is that it is the wires that melt the solder into the joint, not the tip.

 

You ever sweat copper pipe? You heat the pipe joint with a torch, then touch the solder to the joint and it sucks up solder- same thing - the material you are joining melts the solder. Always.

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