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The cost of ownership


BillZ

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I know this subject has been beat to death on many separate threads, but I am planning on a test ride in Louisville this Saturday and I have found so many posts here that I have become alarmed at the comments I have found regarding the cost of owning a BMW.

 

So, with that in mind, can anyone clearly state their opinion relating to the costs of ownership. I currently ride a HD and am wanting to trade for a BMW, with the intent to trade "UP" for reliability and comfort. However, I have found so much grumbling about the problems and costs of owning a BMW that I have become afraid of my intentions.

 

Can anyone help to clarify how much of this is general chatter and how much is fact. I know regular maintenance is required and I am ready for that and I am not afraid to learn to do what ever I can do for myself. However, some of the stuff I have been reading about final drive failure and repeated valve adjustments begins to sound negative.

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Firefight911

When looking at what you are seeing, I think it is important to realize that most of the good things aren't the things people post.

 

That being said, yes, there is a cost of ownership. It can be reduced significantly if you are willing to pick up a wrench every once in a while.

 

As for failures, yea, they happen from time to time. IMO, it's not that big a deal. YMMV.

 

Chains fail as well. As a matter of fact, they need replacing every 20k or so so their is still a cost associated with chain and sprockets, just like FDs.

 

Valves are a scheduled maintenance item that is typically called for every 6k miles. Most here have found that after about 2 or 3 interval checks this can be stretched out a bit until you are in the 70k plus mileage range wherein you may need to start checking a little more often.

 

Just my .02 worth but remember, human nature is more vocal about the negative than the positive. If you doubt me, just turn on the news tonight! thumbsup.gif

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Lawman:

 

I was thinking that the reputation for BMW automobiles would extend to the engineering that goes into the BMW motorcycle. I was hoping for German engineering and quality.

 

So far, the Harley I am riding has been really good, but I have been led to believe by someone whom I respect and has 40+ years on a Harley and has since switched to BMW that a HD isn't equal to the roadworthyness of a BMW for touring and riding a lot. Actually, Harley has admitted they have designed their bikes for people who ride between 3K and 5K per year. Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

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Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

Bill, with all due respect to whoever made that recommendation... they're a friggin' idiot.

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Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

Bill, with all due respect to whoever made that recommendation... they're a friggin' idiot.

 

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

 

I'm not sure I like the person I'm becoming..I was thinking the same thing but for some reason I'm losing my willingness to speak my mind..That's probably a good thing though.. grin.gif

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If you buy a new 2-cyl Boxer, there's a running-in check at 600 miles. After that, service is called for every 6,000 miles (oil & filter, check/adjust valves, adjust throttle bodies, check brakes (fluid, pads and disks), side stand cut-off switch, tires, lights etc.). Air filter is changed every 12,000 miles; plugs are changed at 24,000 miles; gearbox oil is changed every two years; final drive fluid is changed at 600 miles, then supposed to be good for life, but many change it at intervals they're comfortable with. Alternator belt is changed at 36,000 miles. If you have a bike with ABS and steel-braided brake lines, fluid is flushed in wheel circuits every 2 yrs, and in control circuit every 4 years (intervals were recently doubled to those). You could always have a look at the maintenance schedule for the bike you're interested in.

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russell_bynum
Lawman:

 

I was thinking that the reputation for BMW automobiles would extend to the engineering that goes into the BMW motorcycle.

 

That's accurate.

 

BMW automobiles have a terrible reliability record, too. tongue.gif

 

 

I was hoping for German engineering and quality.

 

You'll be getting it. Why solve a problem with 2 parts when you can solve it with 17 parts for 4x the cost?

 

I like BMW's. I own two of their cars and one of their bikes. They are good products that perform well for what they are. Some of the engineering is really really good. Most of the big, major parts are indeed made to last pretty much forever. Where they fall flat on their face is with gadgets, geegaws, and overcomplicated electronics. Those things always seem to have problems and they'll drive you to drink.

 

Also, BMW as a company tends to be very arrogant. They're world famous for pretending problems don't exist, then quietly fixing them (or trying to fix them, in the case of the final drives) while all long pretending that the bikes/cars are perfect and any problems you are having must be because of some flaw in the way you are operating the vehicle.

 

So far, the Harley I am riding has been really good, but I have been led to believe by someone whom I respect and has 40+ years on a Harley and has since switched to BMW that a HD isn't equal to the roadworthyness of a BMW for touring and riding a lot.

 

That's totally subjective, of course. The BMW's excell at eating up miles of road at an elevated pace. I believe the "elevated pace" is the part where Harley tends to come up short. Not that you can't cruise at 90mph on a Harley, but if you plan on doing that very often, you can expect reliability to go way down. If you're content at a slower pace, then the Harley is fine.

 

High Speed stability and handling is also quite good on the BMW's.

 

Honestly, though...it sounds like you're looking at getting rid of a bike that you like, that does what you want it to do because someone told you that your bike ins't good at doing what you do with it. If you're happy with your bike, keep it. If it is coming up short in some area, then look for alternatives.

 

Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

 

That sounds kind of like BS to me.

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I switched from a Harley to a BMW because of the type of riding I was doing at the time. I am 6' 4" tall and spent a fair amount of money trying to make my Harley more comfortable for the 250-350 mile days I was riding. I finally gave up on the Harley when I had to take 2 Advils before getting on the bike.

 

I am comfortable on my BMW for that same mileage, even with the stock seat.

 

Having owned both, I can say that I have not any problems with either one. The maintainence on the BMW has been higher than on the Harley. I replaced the rear tire on the Harley at 9000 miles, but the front was still almost new. The Harley needed one front tire to two rear tires. I do not ride agressively, but both my front and rear BMW tires had to be replaced around 8500 miles. Some of the more aggressive riders replace both tires around 6000 miles.

 

In addition, the brake fluid changes on the BMW are fairly expensive, especially if you have the dealer do the work. These changes are required regularly because of the ABS brake system. The job is very simple on a Harley, except for very recent police models with ABS brakes, Harleys have conventional brakes.

 

Oil and filter changes on both can easily be performed by yourself. Adjusting the valves and synching the fuel injection on the BMW are easy to do by yourself if you have some basic mechanical skills. However, if you depend on a dealer for these maintenance procedures, it can get expensive.

 

I think that the biggest issue with BMW vs. Harley is the Dealer network. BMW dealers are few and far between in most areas. California seems to have the most BMW dealers in concentrated areas. There seems to be a Harley dealer almost anywhere in the USA within 50 miles or less.

 

My nearest BMW dealer is 45 miles away, but the next closest is 125 miles and the next is 200 miles away. There are probably 10 or 15, perhaps even more, Harley dealers in those same distances.

 

Since I moveed to Florida, my riding style has changed a lot. I usually ride only about 75-125 miles. It is flat and there are few interesting roads, along with horrific trafffic and lousy drivers. In addition, since I always ride ATGATT, it is very hot behind the fairing on my RT. That limits the number of days I choose to ride.

 

If I was going to buy a new bike at this time, I would seriously consider another Harley.

 

If you are planning to ride and tour 10,000 - 15,000 miles a year, there is one Harley model you might consider. The Road Glide is very popular out west where people ride and tour long distances and thousands of miles a year. The Road Glide has a frame mounted fairing like the BMW's and very similar weather protection as the BMW RT and LT models.

 

The BMW RT is a very sporty touring bike. The LT and the Road Glide are less sporty and more touring oriented bikes.

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peterbulgar

Normal maintenance, if done by the dealer, will be expensive whether you have a Harley, Honda, or BMW. The Harley has zero-maintenance hydraulic valve adjusters, but the BMWs valves are easy enough to get to, so even if the dealer does the work it won't cost that much. I used to do all the work on my bikes, but now I have the dealer service my R1150RA. Part of the reason is sloth, and the other is that some of the work I can't do (computer hookup to the motronics). A new BMW comes with a good warranty, so any driveline failures for the first 3 years will be covered. If you buy used, then know that BMW is no less (or more) reliable than any other bike on the road - the vast majority of owners never have a major problem. If you are one of the unlucky few, and your bike is out of warranty, it will cost a bundle - BMW parts are expensive.

 

I think it all comes down to whether you like the bike. If the BMW dealer in Louisville is fairly close by, reliable, and if you like the bike then go for it. OTH if you are happy with the Harley and it's never given you problems, then why switch?

Peter '73 R75/5, '04 R1150RA

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w/o a doubt my daughters horses have cost way more than my bikes to own, maintain.....enjoyment is priceless. as Phil stated doing even minimal wrenching saves a ton. with tech daze triple that savings. grin.gif

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don't forget depreciation. It might be the biggest element of cost of ownership, unless you ride lots of miles.

 

I beg to differ. I think the farkles are the biggest cost of ownership.....

 

Now that I think of it, I didn't buy any farkles yet this week.....

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Sounds like maintanence costs are a concern (dejavu). My advice, do as much of the work yourself as possible.

 

If you have the dealer do everything, then it will be expensive. Here's an example of the costs I incurred, which left a very bad taste in my mouth. I will NOT be taking the bike back to a dealer except for tire changes, if I can help it. I am not rich, if I want to own and ride this bike as much as I like to (12,000+ miles a year), I will have to do it myself. These are not exact numbers but approximations.

 

6000 mile service $330

Tires and install $330

12000 mile service $900

this includes the annual brake service that costs around $300

Tires and install $330

 

As you can see it's not exactly cheap.

 

In my experience, I am not impressed with the dealer service around here (A&S). I was overcharged and pretty much had to get on their case to fix my bike to begin with. Every time I went in with issues, I was told what many other repeat, "thats normal" (in my case, bad idle, poor power, knocking, generally the bike ran like crap). I still think the bike has some issues. I plan to go to a private mechanic when I cannot handle the job.

 

My buddy rides a 2005 Vulcan and put as many miles in a year as me. His maintance schedule is far better than mine.

 

My roommate rides a very hopped up Road King. His maintanence seems just a bit more costly than mine. If the Road King maintanence is anything like your Harley. A BMW should be similar, if not slightly cheaper on average.

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harleyjohn45
The recommendation to switch to Harley came from the HD corporate office.

 

 

i would have to see the letter the corporate office wrote to believe it. no way the motor company will recommend someone buy another brand. willie g would have a heart attack. there are tons of harleys in my area that have over 100k miles. one chap last year rode a harley from jacksonville to san diego and returned to jacksonville in under 100 hours breaks included. both harley and bmw are built to last.

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Aluminum_Butt

For the real answer to the $$$ involved in keeping up with the maintenance schedule, I'd ask the dealer. Experience around here shows that there's a pretty big variation in what the dealers charge for specific services. It's been said already in pieces, but any of the R or K BMW's will require:

 

600 mile service (you can often negotiate this into the purchase of a new bike)

6000 mile service

12000 mile service

...then repeat the 6k at 18, the 12k at 24, and so on.

brake flush annually

bigger brake flush every other year

 

Sorry...I can't remember which brake circuits are done at which time.

 

Your dealer should be able to give you a pretty good idea of the cost for each of those service intervals, then you can do the math.

 

FWIW, I have all my service done at the dealer (except for tires), and I budget about $1000/year. That's based on about 10k miles/year. If I had my tires done at the dealer, I'd add another $200 to that.

 

HERE is a link to the service schedule for an 1150RT. That's the most recent I could find, but it's still pretty accurate for the newer bikes.

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James Clark

Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

 

That sounds kind of like BS to me.

 

Not necessarily.

 

 

If you come across as a whiner, most Harley dealers are only too happy to send you off to the competition.

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russell_bynum

Harley actually recommended to this friend that he switch to BMW if he was going to be riding 10-15K per year. So, that is what has led me here...

 

That sounds kind of like BS to me.

 

Not necessarily.

 

 

If you come across as a whiner, most Harley dealers are only too happy to send you off to the competition.

 

lmao.gif

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What model HD do you have? What are you trying to achieve? Which BMW model are you considering? What type of riding do you do?

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tom collins

welcome from a fellow KY rider and owner of both a BMW and an HD. first, you can ride anything anywhere. if you search the net, you will find stories of people riding godawful distances on little 125 cc bikes, pure sportbike repliracers and all manner of harleys. a dresser harley is a common sight on the Dalton Hwy. in Alaska. second, the bikes are completely different and about the only thing in common is 2 cylinders. third, you never mentioned your height, but bmws are tall in the saddle as you will find out on your test ride. fourth, in my case, i use the bmw for longer tours and the hd for cruising around locally. in fact, i returned from west va. two weekends ago and have not moved the bmw since, getting ready to go out again tomorrow with it for an overnight camping trip with about 500 miles of riding. fifth, bmw's are great pack-mules, you can really load em up. fifth, if you get one, after the initial infatuation wears off, you will probably never "love" it. you will like it a lot and respect its abilities, but it doesn't feel alive in the way that a harley does (kind of like a cool beautiful, aloof scandinavian woman vs. a smokin hot cajun hoochie mama). finally, to answer the maintenance question - if you don't do some of it yourself, it will be expensive, period, the end. in my case, at 6,000 mile intervals, with new rubber and service, it would push $600 for minor service and $1,000 for major service with brake bleed. if you ride 12,000 miles or more a year as many bmw guys do, it will add up to a lot. reliability on mine has been excellent - 32,000 miles in 3 years, one small seal and the windshield motor, both repaired under warranty. long warranty is good.

take the test ride - good luck.

 

Tom Collins

04 rt

06 fxdwgli

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Ladies & Gentlemen:

 

Thank you so much for your input. I really value everything everyone has offered and I have read everything. I believe that I will go for the ride and at least be able to say I have ridden a BMW. I am afraid that I am going to fall in love with the RT and my Road King Classic is going to be traded for this new beauty. However, I have made my decision that if must fit my 6'4" frame and be comfortable for both of us to ride for extended periods. That is a deal breaker. My wife loves to ride behind for anything more than day trips so that is really important.

 

I love the idea of less chrome since I have never been a accessories freak about add ons. As I rode home from work yesterday, I paid close attention to the rumble and the clunks and noises from my Road King and wondered about the much quieter nature of the BMW. My wife is concerend about the "cool" factor that comes from a retro style Road King Classic. And to be honest, it has been a great ride that I have loved.

 

Am I just feeling the alure of a strange new bike after the glow has worn off my current model? Probably. But that shiney new R1200RT sure looks good on the internet...

 

I am going to take the test ride and let fate take it's course. But thanks to everyone for all your advice. I am really excited about tomorrow. I have reached one conclusion: You can't find the kind of advice and willingness to share this information on any Harley web site I bumped into yet, and I value this place a lot, and I'm not even a BMW owner,...yet.

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Billz said: My wife is concerend about the "cool" factor that comes from a retro style Road King Classic.
Just wait until she spends some time in the saddle with you on the RT. Her definition of "cool" will change.

 

Good luck with your ride (leave the checkbook at home if you want to 'think about it').

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Based upon the opinions of friends that own both you will have a tough time making a choice with just a test ride. One friend (6'3" 200lbs) has a Goldwing, Road King, and 2007 GS and finds them very different. He laughes at the things that are so horrible on the Road King but still finds it first choice for two up riding at reasonable speeds on reasonable roads. Sure, it does poorly on twisty roads or at speed, but it is fun! After a recent ride he stated that if he always rode by himself, where he is riding at a faster pace on more interesting roads, he would be happy with just the GS.

 

Because it is so totally different in almost every way, when you test ride a new RT it will be very easy to just focus on what it does better or just focus on what it does worse. Take your time, test ride it a couple times, rent one for a day, etc. if you can.

 

Have you thought about buying a used 2005 RT and keeping both? BTW, after having my RT for almost two years, I consider it to be a fantastic combination of good qualities for most of my riding.

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Aluminum_Butt

I am afraid that I am going to fall in love with the RT

 

If you're going for rides anyway, I'd suggest you look at the GT and LT, too. The LT would provide the comfort you want for your wife, and is still a sporting ride - especially compared to the Road King. The GT has a lot more horsepower, but still has all the luggage and amenities, along with a decent place for her to sit.

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Well, I don't ride fast. I am not afraid to push my bike, but I would never push my personal limits because I can't afford the consequences.

 

I love the ride that the Road King provides and really enjoy crusing, but everytime I get to a point on the road where I have to drive more aggressively, I sit up and lean into the machine and adopt a more upright and attentive riding position. I have always wanted bike that incorporated that riding position, but have never found one that fit my 6'4" body that I could be comfortable on for an extended trip.

 

I love to ride and the only problem that I have experienced is when I get home, it always seems that the trip was too short.

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However, I have made my decision that if must fit my 6'4" frame and be comfortable for both of us to ride for extended periods. That is a deal breaker. My wife

So you might want to test ride a GS Adventure in addition to the RT. I narrowed my choices to RT, GSA, & GT and decided on the RT. But you are 5 inches taller than me and may like the GSA added comfort for long-legged riders.

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Well, I won't be doing anything like adventure riding. And I really want the bags that come on the RT. I will probably be adding a top case/trunk and hope to be putting major miles on this bike. I did 9k miles on my Road King the first year and only 8k the second year, but I am off to a great start this year. Sorry for the drought here in Central Kentucky, but it makes for some great saddle time!

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russell_bynum
Well, I won't be doing anything like adventure riding. And I really want the bags that come on the RT. I will probably be adding a top case/trunk and hope to be putting major miles on this bike. I did 9k miles on my Road King the first year and only 8k the second year, but I am off to a great start this year. Sorry for the drought here in Central Kentucky, but it makes for some great saddle time!

 

You can get bags and a topcase (trunk) with the GS models.

 

FWIW, I'm 6'4" and fit just fine on an RT.

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Aluminum_Butt

Well, I don't ride fast.

more upright and attentive riding position. I have always wanted bike that incorporated that riding position

 

Do at least give a glance at the LT, then (it's the BMW version of a Goldwing). Lots of storage, comfort supreme for the pillion, and plenty of power for a bike in its class.

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Based on what you've said, I'd test ride the following bikes and see which one you felt the best about:

 

A K1200LT (2005 and up only!)

A K1200RT

A Harley Road Glide

A Buell Ulysses

 

The list above is arranged in order from most expensive/most to maintain/least reliable to least expensive/least to maintain/most reliable.

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Bill,

Your profile lists an R 1200 RT.

Something you'd like to share with the class?

I'm a little taller than you.

The redesigned RT works better for my long legs than the previous generation.

A major difference between the BMW's and HD is the suspension/brakes.

The BMW will outhandle and outbrake the HD. It will add a dimension of safety when riding alone, and with a passenger, that is an important consideration to me. YMMV.

Comfort is relative, but, in order of most comfortable BMW(with regard to passenger) ...

LT

RT/GT/GS

If your wife rides w/you on one of the K's, GT/LT, the smoothness will win her over, not to mention heated seat for cold weather. thumbsup.gif

The GT would be my first choice because it is lighter and still provides excellent 2 up amenities and is super comfortable with a very sporty performance side, if needed.

If you prefer the twins, the RT will run circles around the HD, and w/the topcase providing a backrest, offer a very nice seat for the passenger.

But, back to my original question, what's up with the profile? grin.giflurker.gif

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I am on my third BMW. The biggest cost to me is the very, very poor re-sale value. When I sold my 96 RS I lost about $6k. When I sold my 01 Superglide sport I cleared $2k. I bought my 01 gs for about half retail in 05. Go figger. If you buy BMW, go used, and let some other poor soul take the $$$ hit.

Cheers

Steve (01 GS)

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H C Edwards

I've beein riding BMW's for 27 years. Also had a near new Harley in the early 80's. That Harley really "spoke to me". What it said was, "I'm a piece of crap." I can't say as there's been a single day I've missed it. There's no doubt in my mind their quality has greatly improved. It may be even better than BMW, whose quality I feel has slipped, cars and bikes. But I still like the flat twins. The feel I get from my bikes is what Tom above gets from his Harley, and none more so than the feeling I still get on my first BMW, my R75/6.

 

I don't think we ride these things for practical reasons. A Prius or VW diesel would get better mileage than my bikes. And if our decisions were strictly practical, I'd ride a KLR in place of my GS. Or maybe just a Honda 750 Spirit as my only bike. Your "costs" seem to focus on increased maintenance cost, and questionable reliability. But I just figure you got to ride what floats your boat...BMW, Harley, Duck, whatever...and screw the costs. I wouldn't try to make it a rational choice. Good luck with your decision.

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I am on my third BMW. The biggest cost to me is the very, very poor re-sale value. When I sold my 96 RS I lost about $6k. When I sold my 01 Superglide sport I cleared $2k.

 

That's what I meant when I mentioned depreciation as the biggest element of cost of ownership. Your $6k depreciation cost is much more than most people will ever spend during those same years on the maintenance and tires that have been mentioned often on this thread, and maybe fuel, too. It's not just bikes that are like this - it's the same thing for cars, too.

 

Harley probably has an advantage compared to almost every other brand in its small depreciation.

 

I don't know if I would say that BMWs have a very poor resale value, though, because they depreciate at about the same rate as a Honda Goldwing for example. It's just Harleys that make a difficult comparison for depreciation.

 

Buying used as you suggest is a good way of reducing the depreciation element of the cost of ownership, and that's exactly why I did it.

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I pulled up behind a guy at the gas pump today. He was filling up his '74 Porche 914. I put the RT on the sidestand and told him that when I was a kid, the 914 was the first car I ever lusted for. He laughed, paused, looked back at my bike and asked, "Why'd ya go with the BMW?". All those maintenance, handling, and resale reasons flashed before my eyes like my life. I just answered, "Just had to be a beemer". We both smiled and nodded.

 

Go get your RT. We'll see you at the UnRally. thumbsup.gif

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Buying used as you suggest is a good way of reducing the depreciation element of the cost of ownership, and that's exactly why I did it.
Agreed AND nothing depreciates so quickly as farkles. Many times one can find a well farkled RT for nearly the same price as a comperable "stock" RT. Then again isn't farkle shopping the number one reason to own a beamer??? lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif
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<threadjack>

....and speaking of farkles....I just got my Wuderlich levers for about $240....yikes! I remember the days when you got a lever, stuck to a piece of cardboard, for about $7 and you could swap it out in the parking lot with a pair of cheap pliers (from your tool kit). Now you buy one for over $100 and you need to have roll the bike in the garage and read the installation instructions. BMW's may be a bit pricey but...at least they're expensive to maintain lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

<\threadjack>

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Well, y'all, I did it. I rode a BMW! It was just as so many of you described. Not better or worse, just different. And I appreciate the difference enough to make them an offer on an LT. I know, I know, I said I was going to ride the RT and I had every intention of doing that very thing. But, I took my wife with me because comfort was my number one concern.

 

So, there we were standing in the show room looking at the sparkling new RT of my dreams (next to the LT) and my wife says, "Can we sit on it?" The sales manager responds, "You haven't been on it yet?" Well, no, because everywhere we go, people are always yelling at us for touching.

 

So, she points at the LT and says, "That one." Once we sat on the coushy seat of the LT with all the cool stuff, there was no turning back. The sales manager wheeled it outside for a test ride, and just then another LT pulls into the lot. The guys jumps off and announces, "This ones for sale too." O5 LT gunmetal grey with 12K miles on it for only $16 and change. Been tricked out with all the cool stuff including the intercome chrome running boards, passenger arm rests, and headlight cover. Well, I rode that LT and never even got to start the RT. My wife was sold on the 05 for almost exactly the same money that we have in the Harley Road King we are trading.

 

We made the offer and the dealership is considering is they can move the Harley to an off lot business associate for sales. This is beyond any hope I had of a good deal on a new 07. The price is right and the bike is loaded and the guy still had all the original parts including the service manual and the dvd. I am anxiously waiting for them to call on Monday or Tuesday to see if we can move the to next stage of negociations.

 

It hard to imagine the timing of these consequences. And hard to sit still and wait...

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Billz said: My wife is concerend about the "cool" factor that comes from a retro style Road King Classic.
To which I responded: Just wait until she spends some time in the saddle with you on the RT. Her definition of "cool" will change.

 

Good luck with your ride (leave the checkbook at home if you want to 'think about it').

 

Like I said earlier /\ Didn't even think about the LT.

 

Good luck. Hope the deal comes through.

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Sounds like you found the right bike. Good for you and your wife. It's gotta be a win win. I sure hope the deal goes through for you. Let us know what happens. Good luck.

KB

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Congratulations! I had a LT once and for two up touring there is no finer machine..Don't let a few bucks keep you from an outstanding deal!..Especially an 05 or later model! thumbsup.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gif

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The LT will be great when your wife is with you, but what if you decide to ride by yourself? Go back and ride that RT. Make it a package deal! thumbsup.gif

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Well, the deal didn't go through. After reading everything that everyone has posted and speaking with the dealership, we decided to pass on their counter-offer. We were just too far apart to loose that much money on my Harley to justisfy letting a good bike go for so little money and loosing all the equity we have built into a great ride.

 

So, I am not a BMW owner, although I still wanna be...

 

Maybe sometime in the not too distant future...

 

(As a side note, the dealership in Louisville was very honest and conducted themselves with a great amount of dignity and good manners. I would highly recommend them and I will be returning there when my opportunity arises.)

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Also had a near new Harley in the early 80's. That Harley really "spoke to me". What it said was, "I'm a piece of crap." I can't say as there's been a single day I've missed it.

 

Everybody knows it's irrelevant to compare an early-80's HD with a modern bike.

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Well, the deal didn't go through.

 

If you really want to move to BMW, why not sell the RK yourself? They are very popular and you shouldn't have any trouble selling it for a good price.

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