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Gouged rear rotor


scurfer

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Went in to get a new rear Tourance for the GS yesturday and was told that my rear brake pads were gone and I was metal to metal. Looked fine before a 2500 mile jaunt up and down in the Sierras from NM. Hope it didn't damage the caliper. The rotor is shot. Down to the dealer for the bad news tomorrow. I just need a shoulder to cry on.

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Down to the dealer for the bad news tomorrow.
Just for comparison, if you do the work yourself an EBC replacement rear rotor and a set of pads will run you about $170.
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I have a new pair of OEM pads in hand. Do you know if these are compatible with the EBC rotor? It put clouds in my sky when I paid something like 170 bucks for two pair of pads alone at the dealer. I tried to researcb a replacement rotor on the web and I don't want to mess too much with something as important as brakes.

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There should be no compatibility issues with the stock pads and EBC rotors. That said, while the repair job is not difficult you know your own skills better than anyone else and if you aren't comfortable and/or don't have someone experienced to guide you then you might want to defer to a professional.

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I'm not trying to be a smart aleck here. I've been riding around with a badly scoured rear disk for about 40,000 miles.

So what? It brakes the same and my rear pads last about the same.

 

Best Wishes, Mark Shuell.

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I'm not trying to be a smart aleck here. I've been riding around with a badly scoured rear disk for about 40,000 miles.

So what? It brakes the same and my rear pads last about the same.

 

Mine is the same way.

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Not that I'm an advocate of anything less than perfect equipment, but suppose you did gouge the rear rotor due to worn out pads, or a pebble getting jammed in there, or whatever.

 

If, say, you were to use some emory paper and wet sand the rotor to take the glaze off, and then smooth out the striations from gouging by the worn out pad rivets, and then install the new pads, maybe the new pads would "seat" into the rotor, further machining and smoothing its surface as you ride. In that case, maybe you would not need a new rotor after all.

 

Or, perhaps the rotor could be removed from the bike and taken to a machine or auto services shop and turned on a lathe to smooth it. That is, after all, exactly what we do with car brake rotors, as long as they have sufficient thickness upon completion of the procedure.

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as long as they have sufficient thickness upon completion of the procedure.
Not likely that they would since the difference between new and the service limit is only 0.5 mm.

 

The OP mentioned metal-to-metal contact so I assumed that the rotor was pretty well chewed, but yes, the bike won't explode if you run around with a rear rotor in poor condition. Everyone has a different personal tolerance for this kind of stuff.

 

But again it's not a very costly repair if you do the work yourself. If you are looking at a costly dealer estimate for the repair and don't feel comfortable doing the work on your own you probably could throw on a set of pads and get by until you can attend the next tech day in your area, and replace the rotor then. Depends on how bad it is.

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This baby is seriously gouged. EBC was good advice. I will call them later this week and will also ask them about the new wave rotors I've seen on newer models. This might add curb appeal at resale time. I do alot of riding in the mountains and try to save my clutch as much as I can by using my brakes instead of heavy downshifting. Thanks to all.

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