Jump to content

Running/Break in Advice. Is there an RPM Limit?


TraderRob

Recommended Posts

More Advice for a Newbie. Is there a maximum RPM for the break in period? I just picked up my bike today & spent some time with the shop tech about break in. She told me that I could basically run it anyway I wanted, just keep changing RPM and speeds for even wear. My impression from speaking with her was that the engines broken in with a little spirit throughout the RPM range seemed to fair better in the long run (according to her). I specifically asked about an RPM limit during break in and was told that there wasn't any.

 

So I started breaking in my new bike with a little spirit, probably even more so than I would even normally have considered. Nothing too crazy, but some relatively quick starts and high RPM ranges (nothing over redline) to spread out the wear. But I did, for a considerable time, exceed 4000 RPM.

 

Then I get home after my 2 hour ride (I live about 100 miles from the closest dealer) and read in the owners manual (R1200RT) that you should not exceed 4000 RPM during the break in period or it could lead to "premature engine wear". At least that is what it appears to say to me, not written the most clearly.

 

Anyway, am I hosed? Or is this a case of the manual does not always know what is best?

 

- Trader

Link to comment

Your fine...I was told by my tech with 25+ years on BMW's that don't take her over 4500rpm's until the 600 mile first service. Do keep alternating the rpm's. to keep everything in check. IE: run through the gears a good bit. Stop & go traffic, freeway speeds, etc

Don't worry too much or you won't enjoy your new ride!

Nice choice in bike BTW!

Link to comment

The technician should have known about that recommendation and at least made you aware that limiting the RPM to 4000 during the break in is the official recommendation from BMW, even if she doesn't agree with it.

 

Nevertheless, I doubt it will make much of a difference. Enjoy your new bike. thumbsup.gif

 

Jay

Link to comment

And I was told to make sure that the engine was warmed up to operating temp. then have at it. You have not harmed yours in any way.

Enjoy.

Link to comment

I live by the maxim, Ride it Like You Stole It. The bike now has 2k on it, and it does't use oil at all. It also seemed to run smoother, less vibration, after several hundred miles of running up and down the rpms. It is very peppy and doesn't lag at all when I ask for power.

 

Dr. J

Link to comment
I live by the maxim, Ride it Like You Stole It. The bike now has 2k on it, and it does't use oil at all. It also seemed to run smoother, less vibration, after several hundred miles of running up and down the rpms. It is very peppy and doesn't lag at all when I ask for power.

 

Dr. J

 

Thats how I break in all of my motors. My RT hasn't needed any oil between changes since the 600 mile service.

Link to comment

TraderRob, I rode my new R1200ST (same engine) much as you described. I'm at 4k miles, it runs like a champ has hasn't yet needed even a drop of oil. There's another thread somewhere here actually recommending a much more vigorous break-in. As said above, you're fine, enjoy!

Link to comment

What most have already said + + but supposedly of *special* benefit is sporadic full-throttle accel to around 7500 followed by closed throttle decel back to 2500, probably done in 2nd or 3rd gear--the decel being just as important as the accel. I did this many many times in the 1st 600 miles (and still do, or at least the accel partcool.gif) and the bikes (2 R12RT's) refuse to use a drop of oil.

Link to comment

For a long time BMW's recommended break in has been keep it under 4000 RPM for the first 600 miles. I'm surprised a dealer wouldn't tell you this.

 

And on the hexhead bikes the BMS-K module records max. RPM. Something to think about, warranty wise...

Link to comment

Just had my 6,000 mile service on my 06 1200 RT and the mechanic, who by the way has all the BMW certifications you could imagine said that it was the smoothest RT he had ever test driven. When asked, how I rode it before the 6,000 miles, I said, I rode it! Never stayed under a certain RPM, never babied it. Just rode it and he said he wished more people would do that. To repeat, ride it like you stole it and no oil loss, no issues and it only gets better.

I did go to synthetic oil at 6,000. It was recommended.

Link to comment

This is a study of one - statistically virtually powerless. I broke my bike in exactly as the manual recommends with lots of curves, hills, throttle variation and never exceeding 4000 rpm. My engine broke in very well with this approach, and this general approach to break-in has worked well with my cars as well. But again, this is just my experience. I would need very compelling evidence to recommend to anyone that they deliberately go against the break-in advice of the manufacturer who designed and built their engine.

 

Jay

Link to comment

It seems to me that Dick Frantz had an excellent post on breaking in a new engine, any kind of engine.

I'm not sure where it went to but I seem to recall it was a good read.

Link to comment

Would someone please explain to me what incentive the BMW engineers would have to advise breaking in the engine in a manner which would ultimately lead to less than maximum performance and minimal oil consumption? That some have had good results ignoring the factory's advice is hardly compelling. Some who chain smoke never get cancer either!

Link to comment
This is a study of one - statistically virtually powerless. I broke my bike in exactly as the manual recommends with lots of curves, hills, throttle variation and never exceeding 4000 rpm. My engine broke in very well with this approach, and this general approach to break-in has worked well with my cars as well. But again, this is just my experience. I would need very compelling evidence to recommend to anyone that they deliberately go against the break-in advice of the manufacturer who designed and built their engine.

Jay

Wrong! It's a study of two as I've been breaking in all my cars and cycles this way for over 40 years and have been rewarded with smooth engines which used little or no oil (with the exception of a Renault LeCar that I don't want to talk about).

Tom

Link to comment

I just this afternoon got my ST back from its 600 mile service (616 miles to be exact). I was a good boy and played by the rules - nothing >4k until the ride home from the service.

 

WOW! It's like riding a whole new bike. Life is good >4k!!!

 

(I'm one of those who will follow-up the manufacturers' break in recommendation - although I'm not 100% convinced it will ultimately lead to more or less oil usage.)

Link to comment
...with the exception of a Renault LeCar that I don't want to talk about.

 

AHA! clap.gif That proves my point. If a precision modern wonder like the LeCar can't thrive with your strategy, then what more proof do you need. grin.gifgrin.gif

 

Jay

Link to comment
ShovelStrokeEd

Yeah but, don't forget the R5 was built on the same basic chassis. I'm not talking the wimpy civilian version but the the real deal. Turbo 4 cylinder where the back seat used to be, made about 300 HP on race fuel as I recall. Wheeeee!

Link to comment
Just had my 6,000 mile service on my 06 1200 RT and the mechanic, who by the way has all the BMW certifications you could imagine said that it was the smoothest RT he had ever test driven. When asked, how I rode it before the 6,000 miles, I said, I rode it! Never stayed under a certain RPM, never babied it. Just rode it and he said he wished more people would do that. To repeat, ride it like you stole it and no oil loss, no issues and it only gets better.

I did go to synthetic oil at 6,000. It was recommended.

 

I kept my RT under 400rpm for the first 600 miles and don't have any oil loss either. I did however, avoid lugging the engine during break-in and tried to keep from running at a constant speed. As much as possible I was either accelerating slightly or decelerating midly. It made for a frustrating break-in period but the bike runs great.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...