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squel when the bike is in nuetral


jlupton

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2002 1150RT 23,000 miles. New "squel" in neutral. dissapears when I pull in clutch lever. Intermittent, sounds like a dry bearing.

 

Fluid level is low, but still on the sight gauge.

Seems to be harder to shit down from 3 to 2.

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ShovelStrokeEd

Throwout bearing, actually part of the clutch slave cylinder assembly. A PITA to change in that the ass end of the bike has to be unbolted and tilted up as I recall.

 

A competent home mechanic can do the job but it takes some time.

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Throwout bearing, actually part of the clutch slave cylinder assembly. A PITA to change in that the ass end of the bike has to be unbolted and tilted up as I recall.

 

A competent home mechanic can do the job but it takes some time.

Not on the 1150. The clutch slave cylinder (with its captive throughout bearing) can be gotten out with the swing arm and rear sub-frame in place. It takes a long Torx extension and some gyrations to get to it's three bolts, but it can be done.
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Thanks for the replies. This is a great source of knowledge.

 

Finally found the slave cylinder.

 

Is this the only part I need to replace?

 

What would cause this failure? Bad shifting / clutch work, part failure, bad maint.?

 

Thanks again.

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You'll need the gasket to as they usually tear during disassembly. Some DOT4 to refill and bleed it and you're good to go.

 

Pull the push rod all the way out while you're there and lube the far end (that contacts the clutch diaphragm spring) with a small dab of molly lube.

 

As to why they fail, who knows? A stuck push rod such that the bearing is being spun all the time, not just when the clutch is pulled is one theory, but it's only a theory. A hanging hydraulic system that is 'riding' the clutch just a bit causing the bearing to spin all the time would be another. There is no maintenance involved with it that directly impacts the bearing. I suppose a bike that sees heavy stop and go traffic as compared to a lot of interstate riding might be some % more prone to just wearing the bearing out. But it's all speculation.

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Might also want to replace the crush washers to the fluid lines on the slave cylinder. Granted the old ones will likely survive but it'd be a shame to try and save $1 in parts only to have a leak appear.

 

Worked best for me to unhook the clutch line at the master cylinder (two more crush washers) and slide it down as I removed the slave, then can unbolt the banjo fitting with the slave turned just right. Bleed line fitting can stay attached until the whole cylinder is sitting on your workbench, then move it over to the new slave cylinder.

Like Ken says, you can remove it all with the rear-end still in place, but my meathooks are just too big to comfortably get in there. Over the years I've learned to remove a few extra parts just to avoid the frustration of cramped spaces.

 

And once the old cylinder is off and you decide to pull the snap ring out to see what's inside.....remember it's spring loaded! dopeslap.gif

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