Jump to content

R1200RT rapid rear brake wear


gdouglas

Recommended Posts

I have a 2005 R1200RT with 33k miles. I had to replace my rear brake pads at 20k due to them getting down to the metal. Fortunately, I caught this condition early enough to avoid rotor damage. I initially concluded that the rapid wear found at 20k may have been due to me instinctively using both the handlebar lever AND the rear brake pedal during this mileage span. I concluded at the time that BMW must have engineered the proper front/rear braking bias into the handlebar lever by itself and that the rear pedal was only needed in tight low speed manuvering. After putting the replacement rear pads on, I changed my braking habits to use the handlebar lever exclusively for 99% of the time to see if the rear pads would last longer. Now, with only 13k on the replacement set, they look like they may make it to 16k of service life. It seems that the change that I made in my braking habits did not have an impact at all on rear pad life. In contrast, all my front pads are original and still have 50% of their life left.

 

Anyone else out there with a hexhead RT or GS notice a short service life on rear brake pads?

 

I was also wondering if the newer models coming out just recently with the non-power assisted braking are experiencing this kind of wear.

Link to comment

Anyone else out there with a hexhead RT or GS notice a short service life on rear brake pads?

 

Apparently it is not uncommon at all. My GS rear pads are ready to be replace at 18K, and my RT with 17k is close.

Link to comment
I was also wondering if the newer models coming out just recently with the non-power assisted braking are experiencing this kind of wear.

Probably not too many 07s with 20000 miles this early in the year of production. Might have some valid info after the heavy riding season (vacations, weather, etc) is completed.

Link to comment
I initially concluded that the rapid wear found at 20k may have been due to me instinctively using both the handlebar lever AND the rear brake pedal during this mileage span. I concluded at the time that BMW must have engineered the proper front/rear braking bias into the handlebar lever by itself and that the rear pedal was only needed in tight low speed manuvering.

I think you may be correct. I have rarely used the rear only pedal on my '06RT and at 16,000, my rear brake is less than 1/2 worn.

Tom

Link to comment

Just had my 30,000 km service done this morning (at 33,000 kms/20,500 miles). I'm told I have 70% left on the rear pads, and 90% on the front. I use both the front brake lever, and rear pedal when I brake (except for low-speed stuff, of course). That said, I've got a lot of highway miles racked up.

Link to comment
RoadJunkie

I have an '06 RT with 32K miles and plan to change the rear pads this weekend, but wear is no where near bare metal; I can still see the last wear ring. My riding is 80% road riding but with a lot of moutain twisties. I typically apply both front and back brakes but hard braking goes to the front. I'm not sure I would quit using the rear brake to save pad wear, however. confused.gif

Link to comment

My use if the lever only isn't to save pad wear. As the brakes are linked, I'll let the computer apportion the front-rear braking - which it is supposed to do when engaging the lever only. With the normal weight transfer on braking, the fronts should do most of the work, but my understanding is that this is defeated when you use the rear pedal along with the "front" lever.

Tom

Link to comment

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that when I relaced my rear pads at 20k, I checked to see if my caliper pistons were dragging. I was able to push the pistons back in very easily with my thumbs to make room for the new pads. That pretty much eliminates a sticking caliper in my book.

Link to comment

Thank you for the reply.

I know my 1100 had a problem out of the factory with the rear brake dragging slightly which caused premature rear brake wear up to replacement of the first set opf pads.

At 23K on my 1200, I have not experienced this, but my ratio is closer to 90% open road to 10% city.

Link to comment
I'm not sure I would quit using the rear brake to save pad wear, however. confused.gif

 

+1 That seems like a bad habit to get into.

Link to comment

I was told by a long time highly skilled BMW mechanic that the side bags cause a low pressure area that sucks lots of dirt and road grit into the rear brake area and this grit causes the rear pads to wear quickly. Is that Gospel true? I don't know, but I do know that the rear pads on my 1996 RT last about 16,000 miles and the front pads seem to go indefinately.

 

Best Wishes, Mark Shuell.

Link to comment

After reading this thread I took a look at mine. Worn down

to the metal backing. Looks like I should have checked them

awhile ago. Would have been nice if they had put a screamer on them like a car has.

Bike has 18k on it. Will be picking up new ones today.

Link to comment

You have me thinking on that low pressure area. Ever since I had the bike from brand new, I noticed that it doesn't take many miles at all for the rear wheel to collect dirt and/or brake dust.

 

I just placed and order with Dennis Kirk for a set of EBC sintered rear pads and a new EBC rotor. I am curious as to what kind of life I can get out of something aftermarket. They should be here within a couple of days. I also plan on changing out brake fluid in the control and wheel circuits since I am at the 2 year mark.

Link to comment
I also plan on changing out brake fluid in the control and wheel circuits since I am at the 2 year mark.

 

I have been told by my tech (as recently as yesterday) that intervals have been extended to two and four years on bikes with steel-braided brake lines, like our RTs. You may want to check that out.

Link to comment
Richard_Spag

I also had a lot of wear on my rear pads & disc. I have now replaced both with EBC items at about 32K miles. Have also now replaced the front pads (2nd set) with EBC pads. All I can say is watch out for the braking from the new front pads - they bite more sharply than I recall other new pads behaving. Brake gently or risk damaging you family jewels on the tank!

 

Recently I have started paying more attention to the high wear that had occurred with the rear brake and noticed that teh rear caliper tends to get very hot indeed (its not dragging though) even after relatively little usage. Has anyone else noticed the tendancy for the rear caliper to run hot compared to the fronts?

 

Cheers

 

Richard

Link to comment

Just has the 18K service on 2005 R1200RT @ 19,000+ miles. The rear pads needed replacement. According to mechanic, this is about normal, maybe a little long. Mechanic indicated it is normal for the rear to wear out about twice as quickly as fronts. I do a majority of riding commuting to work.

 

Seems to me, not discussed with mechanic, that if you look at the bike, the front has dual disks of a larger size than rear. I would expect the rears to wear quicker, commom sense. But I am not an engineer only a self taught vehicle maintenance owner?

Link to comment

Marcopolo,

 

Thanks for the heads up on the increased service intervals on the brake fluid.

 

I checked rear caliper temperature up against a couple other RTs in my area and we all seem to run rather warm after a run on the highway, but not blazing hot to suggest a dragging caliper.

 

On the subject of the low pressure theory, I noticed that the pad contact area of my rear rotor is noticeably worn down compared to the unworn thickness just outside of the pad contact area. I suspect that it may in fact be sand/dirt getting sucked up between the pads and rotor when underway. For a rear rotor to wear like mine has, I find it hard to believe that pads alone would to that to a rotor. Throw in some sand/dirt and that can positively wear a metal rotor down along with the softer pads. In contrast, my front pads and rotors are still original and the rotor thickness doesn't vary much at all from the worn to unworn areas.

 

Maybe some sort of rear disc dust sheild may be in order to keep sand/dirt away from the rotor. Or maybe some sort of aerodynamic engineering which cleans up the airflow around the rear wheel. A solution may be as simple as deflectors or wings on the underside or backside of the hard bags.

 

Anybody have access to a wind tunnel?

Link to comment
paulcbrowne

My son was following me on his GS one day and noticed my brake light was on a lot. I also had had problems engaging my cruise control. It seems that I was not being as conscious as I should have about placement of my right foot. I was actually lightly riding the rear brake! Easy to do. Check your foot position.

Link to comment

I'll take this a step further. Yep, my rear pads were completely shot at 18K. Front are great. Here's the kicker though. twice, my bike (05 GS) has lost front and rear brakes. None. Gone. Nothing. No brakes at all! I assure you, coasting through a red light, frantically downshifting and using the Fred Flintstone brake method in the pouring rain will get your attention! At last service, the dealer informed me that the reason was that the ABS sensed that "something" was up with brakes (worn pads), and, get ready, shut the entire system down! That's right, those German geniuses figure no brakes is better than simply a loss of ABS. I'm considering moving on from BMW on this. It also happened to the Tech that worked on my bike. Same exact thing.

Link to comment
RoadJunkie

I've got to say--for me anyway--trust is a fundamental mandatory requirement for any motorcycle I ride. Absolute brake failure would leave me to park until I could be assured the issue was identified and corrected. Then, execute a slow process for rebuilding lost trust. I can really understand your urge to abandon BMW based on your experience.

 

I hope you will excuse my internal chuckle, however, regarding the "Fred Flinstone" braking technique. blush.gif This episode is also a good reminder to all of us to CHECK THOSE BRAKE PADS on a regular basis. Good luck!!

Link to comment
My son was following me on his GS one day and noticed my brake light was on a lot. I also had had problems engaging my cruise control. It seems that I was not being as conscious as I should have about placement of my right foot. I was actually lightly riding the rear brake! Easy to do. Check your foot position.

 

Yep, same thing. Thought I was having cruise control problems and then realized that my right foot was resting against the side of the brake pedal. Rubbed it enough, I guess, for the brake switch and cruise control to notice. Reasonable that the rear brake could be affected. My pads are OK but I only have 7k on the bike.

Link to comment
CHECK THOSE BRAKE PADS on a regular basis. Good luck!!
Point is that it could be anything abnormal in the system could have done it. In my case, it was worn pads, but, anything relating to the system could have shut it down. I think it's just way too complicated, that's all. It seems the more miles I put on the bike after knowing the situation it becomes less of an issue in my mind, which is really bad. I could lose brakes at any time. That scares me. Alright, I'm talking myself out of riding this bike! What to do? it could happen tomorrow, or, never again, TO ANY OF US!! So, yeah, you don't hear of it much, so, it's relatively rare, but, it could happen to me again, or to anyone reading this Hexhead section of this forum. Something to think about. I'm not trying to talk too much smack about the bike, but, it is what it is...
Link to comment

I'm rather envious of the mileage most seem to get from rear brake pads. My 06 RT has 10200kms (6300miles)and the inside pad has barely 1mm left. The mechanic here in Spain just shrugged and replied "its normal" due to the linked brakes. My previous bike, VFR 800 also had linked brakes but the pad wear was not in the least excessive, but neither was the rear brake very effective. I have also noted that the rear caliper gets very hot. I put this down to heat transference from the final drive but its just a guess. I would be interested to hear what BMW think is average pad life.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...