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Well I was a good boy, gave my dealer a chance at an accessory sale.


fourteenfour

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fourteenfour

Final price difference was over $100 (shipping basically was equivalent to what I would had paid in taxes)

 

Wouldn't budge. At first I thought they might but they keyed in one of the other BMW dealers being Chicago. Hell, another dealer neatly split the difference. I didn't bother with the "other" dealer near me as its a joke working with them.

 

I look at it this way, come within 20 or so bucks and I will buy locally, but $100 isn't up for discussion.

 

Its a BMW part. Its an accessory at that. Does BMW sell parts to one dealer cheaper than others?

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I don't know how it works, but I bought a stock seat for my ST from San Jose for $140 less than the local shop. I told the locals the price from SJ, and there was no interest. Still good folks, otherwise.

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All dealers pay the same for their parts. I do know that San Jose BMW is aggressively courting a strong and growing mail order business. The new parts and accessorie mgr, Ben, is doing everything he can to bring this about.

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Sidmariner

I just closed my retail business. The writing was on the wall.

 

As a general rule, 70% of the stuff in my, or any store for that matter, is there to attract sales to the other 30%. That 30% needed to sell, on average, for at least 40% over my cost just to keep the doors open. My overhead included rent, salaries, advertising, carrying costs and all the other nickle and dime expenses that a retailer incurs (and there are a lot of expenses).

 

Like you, my customers had the choice to buy their items anywhere. They could scour the country and find an online outfit that would sell what they wanted for 10% over cost...not enough profit to keep my doors open but just enough to keep some much much bigger, or incredibly small outfit (without the brick and mortar store to maintain)in the black.

 

When I couldn't make my 40% I shut down. Now my former customers lament because they miss the inventory that was always there and available today, including the odd things in the 70% mix that could not be found nowhere else. They miss the face to face advice. They miss the ability to exchange a product without post office or courier charges. They miss the interaction with my staff and other customers. They miss the ability to examine, touch, compare, try on and test a product before they commit to buying it. They miss the ability to vent and get resolution when a product doesn't work for them.

 

Too bad. But the cost for that privilege was in the 40% margin I needed to make to keep my doors open, let alone earn a paycheck.

 

So my community lost a valuable business, but saved a few bucks...so goes the neighbourhood.

 

That's just the reality of business in Wally World.

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Lets_Play_Two
I just closed my retail business. The writing was on the wall.

 

As a general rule, 70% of the stuff in my, or any store for that matter, is there to attract sales to the other 30%. That 30% needed to sell, on average, for at least 40% over my cost just to keep the doors open. My overhead included rent, salaries, advertising, carrying costs and all the other nickle and dime expenses that a retailer incurs (and there are a lot of expenses).

 

Like you, my customers had the choice to buy their items anywhere. They could scour the country and find an online outfit that would sell what they wanted for 10% over cost...not enough profit to keep my doors open but just enough to keep some much much bigger, or incredibly small outfit (without the brick and mortar store to maintain)in the black.

 

When I couldn't make my 40% I shut down. Now my former customers lament because they miss the inventory that was always there and available today, including the odd things in the 70% mix that could not be found nowhere else. They miss the face to face advice. They miss the ability to exchange a product without post office or courier charges. They miss the interaction with my staff and other customers. They miss the ability to examine, touch, compare, try on and test a product before they commit to buying it. They miss the ability to vent and get resolution when a product doesn't work for them.

 

Too bad. But the cost for that privilege was in the 40% margin I needed to make to keep my doors open, let alone earn a paycheck.

 

So my community lost a valuable business, but saved a few bucks...so goes the neighbourhood.

 

That's just the reality of business in Wally World.

 

Lots of people here and elsewhere who think businesses ought to be happy with 10% mark-up!!! Sorry about your business. I really liked it when I was a kid and could just run across the street to get milk for my mother. Now I can probably buy it cheaper but have to waste time and fuel to do it.

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I will make every effort to buy locally and support the stores that stock my specialty items (ham radio gear, motorcycles).

 

When I bought my Olympia jacket, I could have bought it off the floor from a Suzuki dealer. Instead, I ordered through my BMW dealer. Ham radio gear is almost always cheaper via Internet. But, I don't want to lose that personal touch and the ability to push buttons before I buy.

 

If it costs me a few extra bucks today, I often get it back later on during another shopping trip. The folks who own and run those stores know that I have choices and I choose them. I may pay $100 extra today on an accessory, but the next time my bike comes in for service, I'm pretty certain I get it back (and more) in the attention to detail and littles things that can't be mail ordered.

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I don't know how it works, but I bought a stock seat for my ST from San Jose for $140 less than the local shop. I told the locals the price from SJ, and there was no interest. Still good folks, otherwise.

 

To me, that means they dont need your business.

 

 

Sidmariner Wrote:

 

That's just the reality of business in Wally World.

 

Walmarts have been running the small business out over here for years. We all like buying stuff cheaper, but in the long run, our economy will suffer more and more.

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fourteenfour
Walmarts have been running the small business out over here for years. We all like buying stuff cheaper, but in the long run, our economy will suffer more and more.

 

Actually Wal-Mart is running out the people who put the small businesses out. They are merely the second and more advanced wave. They are clobbering the K-Marts, Sears, and JCPennys that did it to those before them.

 

Wal-Mart still has lots of competition and probably always will. The automobile did more damage to small businesses than any competeing store.

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Walmarts have been running the small business out over here for years. We all like buying stuff cheaper, but in the long run, our economy will suffer more and more.

 

Actually Wal-Mart is running out the people who put the small businesses out. They are merely the second and more advanced wave. They are clobbering the K-Marts, Sears, and JCPennys that did it to those before them.

 

I suppose you are right. Never thought about it like that.

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I just closed my retail business. The writing was on the wall.

 

As a general rule, 70% of the stuff in my, or any store for that matter, is there to attract sales to the other 30%. That 30% needed to sell, on average, for at least 40% over my cost just to keep the doors open. My overhead included rent, salaries, advertising, carrying costs and all the other nickle and dime expenses that a retailer incurs (and there are a lot of expenses).

 

Like you, my customers had the choice to buy their items anywhere. They could scour the country and find an online outfit that would sell what they wanted for 10% over cost...not enough profit to keep my doors open but just enough to keep some much much bigger, or incredibly small outfit (without the brick and mortar store to maintain)in the black.

 

When I couldn't make my 40% I shut down. Now my former customers lament because they miss the inventory that was always there and available today, including the odd things in the 70% mix that could not be found nowhere else. They miss the face to face advice. They miss the ability to exchange a product without post office or courier charges. They miss the interaction with my staff and other customers. They miss the ability to examine, touch, compare, try on and test a product before they commit to buying it. They miss the ability to vent and get resolution when a product doesn't work for them.

 

Too bad. But the cost for that privilege was in the 40% margin I needed to make to keep my doors open, let alone earn a paycheck.

 

So my community lost a valuable business, but saved a few bucks...so goes the neighbourhood.

 

That's just the reality of business in Wally World.

 

Actually, it is the reality of capitalism at it's best, and maybe worst. The marketplace rewards those businesses that run efficiently and have enough vision and fortitude to reinvest in their business to insure long-term success.

 

F.W. Woolworth was of those early retailing pioneers that did business in some of the most desirable street locations in the country. While it was a can't miss business model, there was a bigger player emerging... Sam Walton. It is part of the ebb and flow of business. Like it or not.

 

I am sure many will someday point to Don Fisher of Gap, Inc. as being a pioneer, of sorts. The Gap also had a can't miss formula for success and assumed that the marketplace would react favorably to their every whim. Eventually, they got a little to full of themselves and lost their way. Again, it's just capitalism, for better or worse.

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Walmarts have been running the small business out over here for years. We all like buying stuff cheaper, but in the long run, our economy will suffer more and more.

 

Actually Wal-Mart is running out the people who put the small businesses out. They are merely the second and more advanced wave. They are clobbering the K-Marts, Sears, and JCPennys that did it to those before them.

 

I suppose you are right. Never thought about it like that.

For better or for worse Walmart (Sam's Club, etc) are a sign of the times in America. More than half the stuff in the stores is cheap crap which won't last but a year or so. But with the typical American's constant need for newer/better/different, perhaps a year is all the longer this stuff needs to last.

 

So I try not to shop at the big box stores and I've found something new - service, good quality stuff, and I'm saving money 'cuz I don't come home with a car load of cheap crap I really didn't need! Go figure. thumbsup.gif

 

Greg

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Walmarts have been running the small business out over here for years. We all like buying stuff cheaper, but in the long run, our economy will suffer more and more.

 

Actually Wal-Mart is running out the people who put the small businesses out. They are merely the second and more advanced wave. They are clobbering the K-Marts, Sears, and JCPennys that did it to those before them.

 

Wal-Mart still has lots of competition and probably always will. The automobile did more damage to small businesses than any competeing store.

 

I refuse to buy anything at Walmart. This is the same company that was built with products from Americans (remember the "Red, White and Blue" TV ads.) When old man Walmart died, his son went with all cheap imported Chinese products and really screwed the Mom and Pop shops. I didn't weep when he met his untimely fatal accident.

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creekstone
I refuse to buy anything at Walmart.

Okay, voting with your hard-earned money is cool.

I didn't weep when he met his untimely fatal accident.

That's a bit harsh. crazy.gif

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bakerzdosen

Well, I recently realized that I have a major internet motorcycle outlet not 7 minutes from my house, so I've found myself patronizing them for pretty much everything I can. For example, they were $25 cheaper for my Avon Storms (after sales tax) than SWMototires.

 

To top it off, the owner personally spent 45 minutes with my girlfriend and I trying on helmets and swapping cheek pads before she found the Arai Quantum with smaller cheek pads fit her without giving her a headache. He then sold us the helmet and accessories for $40 cheaper than I could find it anywhere on the web - including ebay. When I get around to buying a Kendon, I'll probably get it there too.

 

Great customer service, friendly, cheap, conveniently located (for me), and honest. I am NOT complaining... and yeah, I know, I'm lucky as I get to benefit from their internet based sales model.

 

I wish they sold a wider variety of products... like food and insurance smile.gif.

 

(Oh, and I too try my hardest to never buy stuff at Wally World, but I have caved 3 times this year when nothing else is around...)

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There seems to be two camps.

 

One is you should shop your local dealer so he is in business when you need him.

 

The other is buy where you can find the best deal.

 

But I've never understood the concept some dealers have which is "All of nothing is better than a little of something." They have costs just by being in business. It doesn't seem to me that turning business away helps their bottom line. In the case of parts, if they were going to have to order it anyway then it wasn't costing them inventory costs associated with having it on hand. If you saved over $100 and the selling dealer still made money then the dealer who refused just lost income.

 

I've experienced the same attitude in the sail boat business.

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