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ME 880's


jfixit

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Can someone that has gone through a couple sets of these tires (ME 880 Marathons) please tell me the best pressures to run? I find myself running 40/40 just because it is easy to remember but I want to run the miles up on them if I can, they need to run through the summer and a late season vacation. Thanks

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from what I recall I was running 39/41 on my 880's and got about 10k out of them and probably had another couple grand left in the front.

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Paul Mihalka

On my R1100RT I was using 38/42, on my R1150R (lighter bike) 36/40. Now I have a R1200GS which I love, but too bad that I can't get ME880 tires in that size.

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<hijack alert> What about running 2 up with gear on the 880. The sidewall says 50 psi max load. Is this too much for the "max load" of the RT, gear and passenger?

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Paul Mihalka

Just by gut feeling on a two-up + gear RT I would use 44 or 45. On the heavy K1200LT bikes, with a 160/70x17 belted rear tire, the most recommended pressure is 48.

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Paul, While you can't get exact ME880 in sizes for the r1200gs. I have bought a 100/90-19 for the front and a 160/80-17 for the rear. Will advise how they work after I put them on

max

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Can someone that has gone through a couple sets of these tires (ME 880 Marathons) please tell me the best pressures to run? I find myself running 40/40 just because it is easy to remember but I want to run the miles up on them if I can, they need to run through the summer and a late season vacation. Thanks

You seem to be missing the basic principle here. Tire pressure has little to do with which brand of tire you are using (assuming we are talking of different types of tires the same size). It has everthing to do with your bike.

 

Assuming you have not changed the tire sizes significantly from those recommended by BMW for the bike, then inflate them according to what the manual says. For sure, the same presssure front and rear sounds VERY wrong! You do NOT use pressures that are "easy to remember"... you use pressures that are correct! In fact, the correct pressure should be on a sticker under the seat. Have you looked there?

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RFW, you can go by the book but you will buy more tires than I do. I've found that different tires, styles, and tread patterns will wear very differently within the same size.

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Paul Mihalka
Paul, While you can't get exact ME880 in sizes for the r1200gs. I have bought a 100/90-19 for the front and a 160/80-17 for the rear. Will advise how they work after I put them on

max

Thanks for the testing! Are they both radials? I would not like to go to belted or plain bias tires.
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Is there any reasonable explanation why you cannot get the ME880's in a 180/55/17 rear tire? I would really like to try a set of these on my RT.

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Is the 10% Rule no longer in vogue?

 

confused.gif

 

I won't be afraid to show my ignorance. What is this rule of which you speak? wave.gif

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ShovelStrokeEd
Is there any reasonable explanation why you cannot get the ME880's in a 180/55/17 rear tire? I would really like to try a set of these on my RT.

 

Maybe cause the manufacturer doesn't make them? dopeslap.gif

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I have been running 38 / 40. Ran the same pressures on the Z6's and got 10k commuting back and forth to work. Not much of any twisties during that time unfortunately or maybe fortunately. So far have close to 3k on the ME 880's and everything looking good. thumbsup.gif

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I have run many sets at 38/40 now and get about 10K out of them, sometimes more sometimes less. I did run the lower recommended pressure on a couple of sets but they only last 6-7K at those pressures. Tyre pressure is a personal preference thing within the bounds of the tyre design, run at the compromise of sticky/long lasting/comfort that makes you happy. I have run them at 40/42 and they last a bit longer but I find the ride too harsh.

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Is the 10% Rule no longer in vogue?

 

confused.gif

 

I won't be afraid to show my ignorance. What is this rule of which you speak? wave.gif

 

Measure the tire pressure cold and then measure it hot, right after you get off the bike. If the hot tire pressure is more than 10% higher than the cold tire pressure, that means the tire is flexing too much and is under inflated. If the difference is less than 10% then there is not enough flexing and the cold tire pressure is too high.

 

This method takes into account the riding style, the load and the type of tire. Sure, one could find fault with the method because it is pretty simple. For example, the cold tire pressure is taken at sea level and the hot tire pressure taken at a significantly higher altitude. It doesn't even matter how accurate your tire gage is because you are taking both temperatures with the same gage (hopefully).

 

That's the method I use.

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On my ME880's I run 38/40 solo and 40/42 two-up. I get good overall wear patterns on both front and rear without excessive flatspotting on the rears (unlike the Dunlop 205s!!!).

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It doesn't even matter how accurate your tire gage is

 

... as long as it's fairly precise.

 

And to the OP: run whatever pressures you like and replace them before your vacation or have a plan for replacing them on the road. There's no better recipe for worry than heading out on a big trip late in the season with tires whose wear you've extended. You'll be worrying the whole time about how much tread you have left instead of enjoying the ride.

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On my ME880's I run 38/40 solo and 40/42 two-up. I get good overall wear patterns on both front and rear without excessive flatspotting on the rears (unlike the Dunlop 205s!!!).

 

I run the same pressures as Phil on my ME-880 bias plys(belted) and get very good wear patterns. I've never seen 10K but one set lasted 9K. smile.gif

The D205's I tried were paper thin after 6K (rear) and that started me looking for a tire with a better load rating. The 160X70X17 ME880 belted tire has a load range C like 1/2 ton pickups. smile.gif

 

Mick

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RFW, you can go by the book but you will buy more tires than I do. I've found that different tires, styles, and tread patterns will wear very differently within the same size.

No question abou that. You can also inflate them the 50 psi on both ends too, and your handling will be ever more weird. There is a lot more to tire inflation than just how long they wear.

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On my ME880's I run 38/40 solo and 40/42 two-up. I get good overall wear patterns on both front and rear without excessive flatspotting on the rears (unlike the Dunlop 205s!!!).

 

I run the same pressures as Phil on my ME-880 bias plys(belted) and get very good wear patterns. I've never seen 10K but one set lasted 9K. smile.gif

The D205's I tried were paper thin after 6K (rear) and that started me looking for a tire with a better load rating. The 160X70X17 ME880 belted tire has a load range C like 1/2 ton pickups. smile.gif

 

Mick

 

Does that mean you only run that tire on a LT? (Light Truck) grin.gif

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I run the same pressures as Phil on my ME-880 bias plys(belted) and get very good wear patterns. I've never seen 10K but one set lasted 9K. smile.gif

The D205's I tried were paper thin after 6K (rear) and that started me looking for a tire with a better load rating. The 160X70X17 ME880 belted tire has a load range C like 1/2 ton pickups. smile.gif

 

Mick

 

Does that mean you only run that tire on a LT? (Light Truck) grin.gif

 

Not exclusively......but my K11LT has the ME-880's on IT too. thumbsup.gifthumbsup.gif

 

Mick

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RFW, I understand you are trying to make a point. However there is a reason I specifically requested information from people that had used ME 880 Marathons, and I appreciate their responses.

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