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Carrying an air pump


ADulay

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All,

 

Well, after my third flat tire in a year, I'm starting to think I probably should be carrying some sort of method to inflate a tire after doing the requisite tire plug schtick.

 

I'm not too keen on those tire slime things but it's either a CO2 cannister or a small electric type pump to inflate the tire.

 

Anybody care to share the pros and cons of either? I've got the room in the side and/or top pack so that's not a problem on the R1200RT.

 

Any takers?

 

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I picked up one of the Slime pumps. It seems to be a very well made unit. I've tested it, but haven't "used" it, and hope I'm so lucky that I never need to. It packs very neatly in its own soft case.

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I bought a Slime pump...and had to use it. Thankfully, I was at home, as the pump failed. Maybe failed is the wrong word. At the rate the pump was inflating, it would have taken an hour. I don't want to be filling a tire for an hour.... I removed/adjusted the valve hose, and still no increase in pressure.

 

I drove to Walmart, and bought one of their $9.97 mini-pumps, got back home, and tire was filled in about 3 minutes.

 

The walmart pump is slightly (and i mean slightly) bigger then the Slime.

 

Anyone wanna buy my Slime pump?! lmao.gif

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JerryMather

I picked up a pump at the bike show a few years ago along with a new patch kit, thinking that if I have them I'll never have to use them.

So far, it's worked out that way, knock on wood. thumbsup.gif

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I picked up a $10 12v unit at WalMart prior to going to Alaska. To save space I took the plastic cover off and have used it for two years now with no problems. I check the tires before riding and if they need some air I just plug in the little air compressor and it does the job. thumbsup.gif

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I have used air pumps on the road. My only problem with them is re-seating the bead. If the bead broke loose from the rim, a 12 VDC air pump may not have enought flow to seat the tire back on the rim. They can generate plenty of presure, but not much flow. I carry at least 12 each 10 or 12 gram C02 cartridges, and an adapter. I like the Ultraflate adaptor that Aerostitch sells. Link I have used it several times and it works very well. You have to have something that insulates your hand from the CO2 cartridge. They get very cold. It takes 4ea 10 gram cartridges to get a rear tire up enough to ride. The last time I used an electric pump, I ended up trying to wrap my body around the tire trying to get the bead to seal. I'm very glad that there was no one around to see my contortions. I ended up using the BMW adaptor and the cartridges that came with the bike. Make sure you carry enough CO2 to do the job at least twice. The 12 gram cartriges carry 20% more in about the same space, but they are more expensive.

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It doesn't matter which one you buy. Once you have it, you won't need it. thumbsup.gif

 

That's been my experience. Before buying a pump (I like the Slime pump) and a plug kit I had only one tire wear out -- the others died of stab wounds. After buying a pump ... [knocking on wood] ...

 

smirk.gif

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After my recent experience with CO2 cartridges (10 10g units were insufficient to reinflate the rear tire to a safe riding pressure), I now have a slime pump. Pump function has already been verified with Canbus controlled power outlet.

 

If one desires something to help with bead seating, just include a length of nylon cord sufficient to go around the center tread of tire as part of the tire repair kit. Make it long enough to allow for tightening via twisting with a screwdriver or winding on a BMW toolkit sparkplug wrench then rotating the wrench to tighten.

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I drove to Walmart, and bought one of their $9.97 mini-pumps, got back home, and tire was filled in about 3 minutes.

 

The walmart pump is slightly (and i mean slightly) bigger then the Slime.

So how did you connect the WalMart pump to the bike's power? Did you get a plug converter so you could use the BMW power socket?
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I bought a Slime pump...and had to use it. Thankfully, I was at home, as the pump failed. Maybe failed is the wrong word. At the rate the pump was inflating, it would have taken an hour. ...

 

 

Anyone wanna buy my Slime pump?!

 

Any reason you didn't return your defective Slime pump?

 

For any others choosing a pump, my Slime pump takes a front tire from 0 to 38psi in almost exactly 3 minutes.

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It doesn't matter which one you buy. Once you have it, you won't need it. thumbsup.gif

Uh, in the back of my mind, that's kind of what I'm hoping for! thumbsup.gif

 

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SAAB93driver

I bought the slime pump during a trip after my Kmart unit failed. Later I bought the one I really wanted - the Cycle Pump. The Cycle Pump is way expensive but the chuck for putting in on the stem is great and the thing really is built well. It is only a little bigger than the slime one. I now carry the slime one in my car and the CP under the rear seat cowling.

 

I use the compressor all the time to top up tires during a trip, and once to pump up a flat - I hope that once is all I will need it for that but I don't travel without out it.

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Couchrocket

I have the Cycle Pump, but I also carry a fist full of CO2 carts on the bike for the initial fill from empty if I need to do that. Figure it will save the bike's battery and some time. Then will top off w/ Cycle Pump. That's the theory at least.... other than testing the CP to make sure it works, I've not used it! Hope to keep it that way, knock wood. I carry Aerostitch's Touring First Aid Kit for the same reason... snapping fingers to keep elephants away. grin.gifgrin.gifgrin.gif

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I bought a small 12 V compressor from Canadian Tire. $10 on sale. Put a plug on the end of the cable that fits the accessory outlet. Works great, and fits in the hump behind the seat with the tools and patch kit.

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I drove to Walmart, and bought one of their $9.97 mini-pumps, got back home, and tire was filled in about 3 minutes.

 

The walmart pump is slightly (and i mean slightly) bigger then the Slime.

So how did you connect the WalMart pump to the bike's power? Did you get a plug converter so you could use the BMW power socket?

 

I also got one of their pumps and it works great. You can plug it in using a plug adaptor from Aerostich. Simply cut off the old plug and wire in the new one. The adaptor works on regular cigarette lighters and BMW sockets. I use my pump in the car and both bikes.

 

http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/BMW-Plugs--Sockets-p-16530.html

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So how did you connect the WalMart pump to the bike's power? Did you get a plug converter so you could use the BMW power socket?

 

OR--if you're concerned about using the BMW plug and disturbing the Canbus' erratic personality, you can use a cigarette lighter plug adapter with small alligator clamps on the other end and connect directly to the battery--very easy to get to under the seat on R12RT.

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Lineareagle

I just carry a two stroke bicycle pump.

It converts back and forth from hi volume to hi pressure.

I can take an empty tire to 45 psi in about 150 strokes!

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That's exactly what I carry. Kind of pricey but IMO worth it. The in-line guage is top notch. This is really a first class setup. It comes with cases for both the guage and pump.

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Jerry Johnston

My disasembled Wally World pump fit's in a bag about the size of a small tool kit that fits in the tail section of the bike. It goes from MT to 45# in no strokes, but you have my interest - what are the dementions of the dual stroke bicycle pump and where do you store it?

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Whatever one uses to re-inflate tires, test the system at home before actual emergency use is needed.

As stated in my prior post, my CO2 cartridges were not able to reinflate my tire to a pressure that I felt was safe to ride at least 40 miles (distance to the closest known compressed air source). My CO2 dispenser also had a hand pump backup system, which, even though it probably would have taken about 1000 strokes, should have resolved my issue. Instead, I found out in the worst circumstances that the hand pump when attached to the valve stem could not depress the valve pin enough to allow air to flow into the tire.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Had to us the slime this last week. 0 psi to 45 psi in about 7 min. for the rear tire. - patience grasshopper, it gains pressure faster as the tire inflates.

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