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Do you check your MC every ride


wrestleantares

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wrestleantares

By this I mean the whole T-ClOCK checklist they teach in MSF.

 

T - Tires,wheels and brakes

C - Controls

L - Lighting and Electrical

O - Oil

C - Chain (if you have one) and chassis

K - Kickstand

 

T - I don't check my tires/wheels and brakes every ride (I commute daily) at least to the point of tire pressure. I just look visually and check pressure - and have a closer visual inspection about weekly.

 

C - Controls - I don't really check these, but before I get out of my basement and driveway everything has gotten used. I do check cables, etc. periodically - weekly normally.

 

L - I rarely check my lighting, though I am in a dark basement every morning and can see the lights go on.

 

O - Oil - my bike doesn't really burn oil so I am less anal about it than I used to be. I check the glass at least a couple times a week for commuting. More on trips.

 

C - No chain, and my whole bike has been rebuilt so checks are infrequent. I do monitor the rear end, and if there is something wrong with the feel I'll check it.

 

K - Kickstand. I check it once a week or sometimes less.

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Mine gets TLC every ride...

Tires - Tread, sight check pressure (physical check every other week)

 

Lights - Headlight mostly - is it working. Flash brights. Leave brights on for daytime riding. Check other lights about once a month.

 

Controls - Both brakes and clutch get a work-out in order for me to move bike from garage to driveway. Check Throttlemeister to be sure it's not engaged.

 

As for the O C K:

Oil - check about once a month. Haven't seen a real need to continually check this.

Chain - As long as I see the drive shaft, I assume it's good. Regular scheduled maintenance otherwise.

Kickstand - I guess I do check this every ride, just to make sure it's up and not dragging or hanging down. Same with centerstand.

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russell_bynum

For a normal day to day ride...

 

I'll push my thumb into my tires to make sure they're not flat. By the time I get to the end of the street, I know if the brakes work. smile.gif

 

Likewise the controls. They'll all get used before the end of the street.

 

I never check the lights.

 

The bike sits on a Pit Bull stand and it is very easy to eyeball the oil level in the sight tube, so I'll glance at that before I fire it up.

 

I take the toe of my boot and feel the chain's free play. The chain gets sprayed with lube after every ride, so I don't worry about lubing it prior to a ride.

 

Kickstand? I put it up when I'm ready to leave. If that doesn't work, I don't leave. cool.gif Not sure what else I'm supposed to be doing there.

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No, I don't go through the entire checklist before every ride. Before a longer trip, I go through everything from top to bottom, but aside from those times I just check things on a regular basis. "Regular," being defined by my experience and best guess as to how likely something is likely to go wrong.

 

For instance, if I've checked my oil in the past few hundred miles and there's not a huge puddle on the garage floor, I probably won't check it--I have a pretty good sense of my bike's oil consumption.

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Firefight911

I check mine AFTER every ride. That way, other than a quick tire check, I know it's ready to go.

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Yes, I preflight everytime.

Tires, tire pressure, pad thickness, fluid level, component tightness and control feel. Most importantly I preflight myself.

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Not only do I check my bike I routinely check on bikes that are going with me. It never hurts to make sure the whole group is safe. Found out that I still had a late 90's Harley voltage regulator for softtails in the spares kit. Sold the RT andwanted to put all the non BMW parts in new kit. Oddly I ran into a Harley by the side of the road last weekend that needed that part. Life can be strange sometimes. Torn as to whether I should still stock one as most of my riding friends are on newer models. How prepared should one be?? dopeslap.gif

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Quite honestly I check NOTHING prior to a daily ride. On a long trip or a particularly challanging ride, I will check tires but that's about it other than periodic maintenance schedule in which I will check most items. On my ride back from Torrey, I checked my tires at every gas stop confirming that there was little if any rubber left.

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I check mine after every ride and thoroughly every other week.

 

Last week another rider happened to notice one of the bolts holding my right handle bar was loose. I removed my radio and noticed it was most of the way out (the way my ram ball mount is, it covers the bolt heads). When I removed the RAM mount (the one that uses one of the handle bar bolts), I sqw that not one, but 2 of the bolts were backed out 90%, the 3rd bolt took 1/2 turn, and the 4th was tight.

 

I installed BarBacks a few months ago. I dont know WTF happened - if I got distracted when installing them or if they backed out after being torqued. I think I am going to put some blue locktite on them as that would have been a scene right out of a cartoon.

 

Oh...and I check the oil every time. I have not gotten used to the consumption yet as it seems to vary.

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Of course I do. Before each ride:

 

T - I check tire pressure with three freshly calibrated pressure gauges to be sure I'm running the correct pressure. I log tread depth at 6 points on each tire (8 is overkill), run my wheels through redundant scanners in case a crack has developed and recalibrate my brakes, bleeding them after the rebuild below. Roughly every month or so I install new brake lines and send the old ones out for a diagnostic inspection.

 

C - I rebuild hand and foot controls to be sure of their correct operation. Of course this involves bleeding all of the brakes and the clutch one bike. It's time consuming of course, but better safe than sorry.

 

L - I use a multimeter to check all the wiring before each ride and replace anything that isn't 100%. All plugs and connectors are cleaned and resealed. I find that the plugs are often dirty after about 9 days, so they get replaced regularly along with the plug wires. The headlight, turn signals and brake lights are all removed and connected to a test rig that I use to verify their correct operation under a variety of conditions.

 

O - Of course I change all oil before and after each ride and sometimes at rest stops. Dirty oil just isn't worth it.

 

C - I inspect each link before riding and lube as required. The chassis and suspension also get a thorough inspection. If I notice a significant change from my last ride, I'll tear down the bike and do a rebuild. It's not that much work if you combine it with the electrical diagnostics and have the spare OEM parts on hand.

 

K - Both the kickstand and the centerstand get a thorough cleaning before I scan for microscopic cracks. Then they get regreased and operational tolerances are logged. Springs need changing about every month or two depending on how much I ride.

 

If anything is out of the ordinary or otherwise suspect, I cancel the ride and call for a tow to my local authorized service center.

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Paul Mihalka

As I ride to work every day unless the weather is real lousy, no "each ride" checks. Most Saturday afternoons when I get home from work early, the bike gets a inspection. Tire pressure, oil, may be a spray of chain lube on the side and center stand. This way I feel good for my Sunday ride. Today's bikes are pretty much like today's cars. Turn the key and go, unless service is due or you hear expensive noises.

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ShovelStrokeEd

I'm with Paul. I do a visual and that's about it, I ride every day but it's a really short ride for the most part.

 

Chain gets lubed once a week and adjusted about once every 2 months, chains just don't wear and stretch like the used to, at least not the top quality ones I buy.

 

Back home, I'll check that the brake light is working as I back into my hedge.

 

Every Saturday or Sunday morning I do the tire pressure thing or any time the steering feels a little heavy.

 

I just don't bother checking the oil. I had the right amount in there when I changed it some time in the last 6000 miles, I'll have enough in there today.

 

I do have a big maintenance planned for the Blackbird, as soon as I get the VFR finished, probably not this weekend as the 'bird and I are off to Auburn, AL. One weekend real soon now though, all the parts are sitting in the garage.

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Of course I do. Before each ride:

 

T - I check tire pressure with three freshly calibrated pressure gauges to be sure I'm running the correct pressure. I log tread depth at 6 points on each tire (8 is overkill), run my wheels through redundant scanners in case a crack has developed and recalibrate my brakes, bleeding them after the rebuild below. Roughly every month or so I install new brake lines and send the old ones out for a diagnostic inspection.

 

C - I rebuild hand and foot controls to be sure of their correct operation. Of course this involves bleeding all of the brakes and the clutch one bike. It's time consuming of course, but better safe than sorry.

 

L - I use a multimeter to check all the wiring before each ride and replace anything that isn't 100%. All plugs and connectors are cleaned and resealed. I find that the plugs are often dirty after about 9 days, so they get replaced regularly along with the plug wires. The headlight, turn signals and brake lights are all removed and connected to a test rig that I use to verify their correct operation under a variety of conditions.

 

O - Of course I change all oil before and after each ride and sometimes at rest stops. Dirty oil just isn't worth it.

 

C - I inspect each link before riding and lube as required. The chassis and suspension also get a thorough inspection. If I notice a significant change from my last ride, I'll tear down the bike and do a rebuild. It's not that much work if you combine it with the electrical diagnostics and have the spare OEM parts on hand.

 

K - Both the kickstand and the centerstand get a thorough cleaning before I scan for microscopic cracks. Then they get regreased and operational tolerances are logged. Springs need changing about every month or two depending on how much I ride.

 

If anything is out of the ordinary or otherwise suspect, I cancel the ride and call for a tow to my local authorized service center.

 

 

 

 

 

smirk.giftongue.gifgrin.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif That made me laugh...... yes, yes it did

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Silver Surfer/AKAButters

Honestly? For my commutes (daily) I check nothing on a daily basis. I do however, take an initial detour down a quiet street adjacent to my route before I hit the main road to do some light swerving, braking, etc. to check the controls, brakes, and tires. Anything anomalous, and I'll double back to have a closer look. Prior to a days riding or a trip, I go over everything with a fine tooth comb

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FlyingFinn

+1

 

For a normal day to day ride...

 

I'll push my thumb into my tires to make sure they're not flat. By the time I get to the end of the street, I know if the brakes work. smile.gif

 

Likewise the controls. They'll all get used before the end of the street.

 

I never check the lights.

 

The bike sits on a Pit Bull stand and it is very easy to eyeball the oil level in the sight tube, so I'll glance at that before I fire it up.

 

I take the toe of my boot and feel the chain's free play. The chain gets sprayed with lube after every ride, so I don't worry about lubing it prior to a ride.

 

Kickstand? I put it up when I'm ready to leave. If that doesn't work, I don't leave. cool.gif Not sure what else I'm supposed to be doing there.

 

--

Mikko

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As a rule I check all lights - including Motolites, modulator,flashing brake and all signals every day before I ride. Tire pressure with a guage once a week with visual roll on stand. Oil at 300 miles or so. Controls just by feel before I roll.Every 2 to 3 weeks I rattle both wheels and the front and rear ends on the stand.The daily checks help me get focused, like putting on all the gear. I like it. Then there's general walkarounds and occasional cleanings to look at other stuff.Not to mention staring at the damn thing every chance I get.

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Controls are checked before I'm out of the driveway. Lights generally too (usually leave before sunrise). I always check my rear brake, turn and tail lights. A walkaround generally once a day at some point.

 

Oil every few days, "Runflat" tires make me a bit sloppy on checking tire pressure.

 

Chaff guns to deter < 10' rear cage seperation at 50mph+... tongue.gif

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St0nkingByte

I make sure the engine starts and then every once in a while I check the speedometer to make sure I'm really moving. Also when I'm stopped a light behind a shiny/reflective car I check to make sure I still look cool enough.

 

grin.gifthumbsup.gif

 

Seriously I give my bike a once over every other weekend or so. If I'm going on a long ride (rare) I might give it a real thorough check the night before. If you ride every day at least twice a day stuff doesn't usually sneak up on ya.

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T - Check my tires pressure before every ride that has had the bike sitting for more than a day. Otherwise, just a quick once over to make sure nothing is poking out, the tread is still showing and no flat tires.

 

C - Controls - I don't really check these either. My driveway is sloped, so if things are not working properly I figure I will know by the first 100 yards to the end of my street.

 

L - I rarely check my lighting. The bimmer has an idiot light to tell me when a bulb is out. Usually when I pull up behind a nice clean shiny cager at a stoplight I can see my headlight reflection. I like shiny things. wave.gif

 

O - Oil - checked before trips lasting days or on my regular service. The last few bikes have not burned oil, lucky there I guess.

 

C - No chain on the bimmer. Check the Suzuki's chain before a ride, but I can't honestly tell you I would know when it is considered too loose. Obviously I would know it is was so loose it would come off, but the dealer checks it out on maintenance cycles.

 

K - Kickstand. If it comes off the ground and stays up, I guess it works. Habit when I park the bike to keep straddling it until it sets securely on the stand, before I get off.

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I only check before major rides and once every week or so. I'm lucky I have enough time to ride it let alone check everything before I go! I'm usually zipping up my pants as I get on..... dopeslap.gif

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riding4work
Yes, I preflight everytime.

Tires, tire pressure, pad thickness, fluid level, component tightness and control feel. Most importantly I preflight myself.

 

Maybe it's because professional riders are on the clock that a preride bike check becomes habit. A life saving habit.

 

Every professional driver with a Comerical Drivers License does a complete pretrip inspection of their vehicle at the begining of every shift. Your life and their job could depend that vehicle's condition.

 

If I am not feeling 100% physically and 110% mentally, I don't ride.

 

I can tell seasoned riders by watching when they get back on their bikes after a rest stop. They walk completely around the bike looking for anything out of place and they kick their tires. (RUB's don't count when looking at the shiny chrome and if anything fell off)

 

Being anal is funny but jumping on and going is silly.

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Sidmariner

I check the oil when I get home at night after about every second tank fill.

 

If there is no pool of oil under the bike in the morning I jump on.

 

I've got those little pressure indicating caps on the tires. If they're green I'm good to go.

 

I back out of the garage while waiting for the garage door to go all the way down (I once took off without checking and the garage door hit my little garage stool, went back up, and stayed open all day while I was at work). I turn on the bike and the Moto-lights. Since I'm still facing the garage I can tell if their working.

 

I back away making sure not to hit my truck in the driveway. I tapped the brakes and check the reflection in the chrome of the old F250.

 

Doing the three point back up requires me to go stop-to- stop on the bars. No restrictions...no problem.

 

By the time I get to the bottom of the short driveway I've checked the brakes, clutch and turn indicators.

 

Every weekend I check the brake fluid levels and do a once over on everything else while the girl gets a good scrub.

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chrisolson

Don't check anything for the daily commute, although once I did turn back to home in the first 1/2 mile and added some pressure to the font tire .... wink.gif

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By this I mean the whole T-ClOCK checklist they teach in MSF.

 

T - Tires,wheels and brakes

C - Controls

L - Lighting and Electrical

O - Oil

C - Chain (if you have one) and chassis

K - Kickstand

T - yup, still there

C - huh? That's my job!

L - It started.

O - I added oil this week (BMW), or have never done so (Honda)

C - at least once every six months or so (Honda), BMW a bit more often

K - shucks, it was already sitting on it!

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Bill_Walker
C - Controls - I don't really check these either. My driveway is sloped, so if things are not working properly I figure I will know by the first 100 yards to the end of my street.

 

Yeah, but sometimes you may not like the answer. I recently did a front tire change on my bike, which of course requires removing the calipers, which requires pushing the calipers back a bit to get them on and off. And then I forgot to reseat the pads.

 

Then I rolled the bike out of the garage and down the driveway waiting to start it until I reached the street. With the key off, the front brake lever wasn't much more effective than dragging my feet! And of course, there just happened to be a car that came up the street at the time. Darn near hit the thing, and I live in a cul-de-sac!

 

I'm a bit better about checking the controls now.

 

I check tire pressures before most rides, especially if I haven't done so in the last day or three. And I usually try to check lights. Given that it's an oilhead, I try to use the Official Oilhead Oil-Checking Procedure, which requires checking it while it's hot, so I check it at the end of the ride.

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