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Homemade Oil Cooler Screen for 1200RT


gettysburg

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gettysburg

I didn't like the look(or the price) of either the Wunderlich or Touratech oil-cooler screens, so I decided to make my own.

 

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The toughest part was finding a company that didn't require that you purchase a huge amount of material. I came across www.smallparts.com; which sells 12"x12" sheets of perforated stainless steel(w/various hole sizes). I chose PMX-125-A(22 gauge, 1/8" staggered holes) $30.25. It's thick enough to be self supporting, but still thin enough to be cut with tin snips.

 

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Looks like you might be able to turn a profit for them.

 

I would like to do this for my 1150rt. Another material option could be metal gutter covers - available at home depot.

 

Nice work thumbsup.gif

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gettysburg
Has it decreased air flow and did the engine temperature go up?

 

I just installed it so I don't know. But it's got 40% open area; which is similar most other screening material. The only way to get greater open area is to go with bigger holes, but that will decrease the protection the screen provides

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gettysburg
Looks like you might be able to turn a profit for them.

 

I would like to do this for my 1150rt. Another material option could be metal gutter covers - available at home depot.

 

Nice work thumbsup.gif

 

I already had plenty of leftover gutter material(expanded aluminum screen), but I wasn't keen on using aluminum, and I didn't care for the look(that's what both Touratech and Wunderlich use). My wife ordered a Touratech screen for her RT. I'm going to try to convince her to return it since I've got enough material left over to make two more.

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That looks good - nice work. Keep us posted on any obvious change in oil temp. I'm guessing that you won't see one. thumbsup.gif

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I haven't noticed any change in the temp bars from 40's to 100+ with a piece of window screen (approx. .05 worth) inserted in front of the cooler....Last weekend it was about 100 and riding hard on a track I don't think the temp bars moved....... But, if you decide to make those neat screens commercially sign me up... thumbsup.gif

 

Phil..........Redbrick

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gettysburg
How hard was it to install? Did you have to take off any fairings etc?

 

Kurt

 

The assembly holding the headlight needs to be removed(basically the whole front face of the bike). Its not as bad as it sounds though. About 14 screws total; eight of which hold the left and right side fairings on.

 

The first time it took me 20 minutes to figure out how to remove the front end, now I can do it in less than 5.

 

I'll most likely be installing fog lights on our bikes this weekend(if they arrive). I can snap some pics of the dis-assembly process and post them.

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...I'll most likely be installing fog lights on our bikes this weekend(if they arrive). I can snap some pics of the dis-assembly process and post them.

That would be appreciated by many or, at least, me.

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gettysburg

The instructions for removing the front-end of the 1200RT are listed below. You will

need the following tools

 

- T25 torx driver.

- T30 torx driver.

- Small flat-head screw driver(for removing cir-clip)

 

1. Remove the 4 screws holding on the left and right side fairings(next 3 photos).

You'll also need to disconnect the accessory socket on the left fairing(not pictured).

It's a quick release connection, but it's a tight space and a little difficult to reach.

 

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2. After removing windscreen(not pictured), remove the two black painted screws which

secure the top of the instrument panel frame. You will also need to remove the two

bottom pins which attach the windscreen bracket to the control arms. Use a small flat-head

screwdriver to loosen the cir-clip from the pins, then slide the pins through.(Next 2 pictures)

 

155991212-L.jpg

155991213-L.jpg

 

3. Remove the remaining 6 screws which hold the front face to the frame.

The four larger screws which have large washers behind them require a T30 torx driver.

The remaing two screws are T25 torx. Finally, disconnect the turn signal sockets from thier

housings and dissconnect the main headlight electrical connection from behind the headlight assembly

Now you can pull the whole front end off the bike(Next 3 pictures).

 

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4. The front-end assembly removed.

 

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5. Backside view of the front-end assembly. Screw which can be used to hold

oil cooler screen is circled.

 

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To re-assemble, follow the instructions in reverse. The only tricky part will be lifting the wind screen brackets up with one hand, while sliding the front-end assembly underneath them. Also, don't forget to re-hook the main headlight connectionfrom behind.

 

Hope this helps thumbsup.gif

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As a matter of record, my dealer did recommend against using any screen in front of the cooler. I was going to install one of my own, but decided against it. I don't know if he has actual data on decreased cooling, and I'm sure it depends entirely upon ambient temps, but I will hold of and see how buggy it gets.

 

Gary

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gettysburg
As a matter of record, my dealer did recommend against using any screen in front of the cooler. I was going to install one of my own, but decided against it. I don't know if he has actual data on decreased cooling, and I'm sure it depends entirely upon ambient temps, but I will hold of and see how buggy it gets.

 

Gary

 

I honestly don't think it will be a problem. I held my hand up behind the oil cooler and blew through the screen. I could still feel a good amount of air flow.

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Looks great! I too went the cheap way with a piece of aluminum window screen. Your idea is better since the material is thicker and the wind doesn't push it against the oil cooler.

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j4bberw0ck

thumbsup.gif Thanks for explaining one of the Great Mysteries of The Universe so neatly. Much appreciated.

 

Looking at the pics, your Garmin 2xxx appears to be semi-permanently (?) mounted to the left of the dash. How did you do that? What kind of mount did you use? Or is it just the way it looks in the pics?

 

Many thanks -- Mark

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I would expect over-heating problems at city driving speeds, since you've reduced the air flow by 60% for an engine that's already known for being un-happy at low air flow speeds...

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gettysburg
....for an engine that's already known for being un-happy at low air flow speeds...

 

That's news to me. Anyway, I'll get a chance to test it out this weekend; but I'm not expecting any problems.

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gettysburg

Looking at the pics, your Garmin 2xxx appears to be semi-permanently (?) mounted to the left of the dash. How did you do that? What kind of mount did you use? Or is it just the way it looks in the pics?

 

Many thanks -- Mark

 

I took a 4"x2.5" aluminum plate(painted black) and bolted it to the instrument panel frame. I then mounted the the standard Garmin 2XXX motorcycle mount to this plate. I hard-wired the Garmin power cable to the wires which supply power to the accessory socket on the left fairing. The bracket is permanently mounted, but I can still remove the Garmin unit.

 

I don't have a radio/CD(nor do I plan to install one), so covering up the speaker grille wasn't an issue.

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Very nice James. With some concerns about air flow that some have, if it becomes an issue try the PMX062 screen.

 

The PMX125 with .125" holes and 33 per square inch equalls 4.125 in area.

 

With the PMX062 with .062" holes and 132 per square inch equalls 8.184 in area. Half the size holes but 3 times the number holes per square inch.

 

The .062" (1/16") holes will protect better and let more flow through.

 

This is how they do it with race cars, small diameter wire (big enough to have proper strenght) small holes to clean the air but this equalls many holes for air flow.

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gettysburg
Very nice James. With some concerns about air flow that some have, if it becomes an issue try the PMX062 screen.

 

The PMX125 with .125" holes and 33 per square inch equalls 4.125 in area.

 

With the PMX062 with .062" holes and 132 per square inch equalls 8.184 in area. Half the size holes but 3 times the number holes per square inch.

 

The .062" (1/16") holes will protect better and let more flow through.

 

This is how they do it with race cars, small diameter wire (big enough to have proper strenght) small holes to clean the air but this equalls many holes for air flow.

 

I was debating on what size & spacing of holes would be best. In the end I chose the PMX-125(1/8" holes) because I thought it looked the best and had roughly the same open area as PMX-062. Aside from the occasional traffic jam, my riding will be at 60+mph.

 

When my wife had her GS, she had an oil cooler guard that had to be 25% open area max., The openings weren't even uniform and she never had temp. problems.

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IndianaHarvey

Looks great and very professional. However, I just cut a piece of plastic window screening and slip it in front of the cooler without having to take the fairing apart. It's very easy to pull the screening out to clean it if needed and it's dirt cheap.

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Looks great. Thanks for showing all steps one by one. I really appreciate people's efforts to share such experiences.

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Im i missing somthing,,How do the mirrors come out,,I hate it when I say,O THATS HOW IT COMES OFF,,And then have to buy a new mirror dopeslap.gif

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gettysburg

I rode into work today(60 mi. one way), with the outdoor temperature in the mid. 80's. The oil temp. gauge never rose above the halfway point.

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Husker Red

Thanks for the follow up. I was checking out the website that you used to order the screen. There is a size larger hole that allows 10% more air. Of course that also allows 10% more bugs and rocks to hit the oil cooler, although I suppose it's the big ones we're really concerned with anyway. Frankly, I like this project because it looks good, not really for the protective value. The stainless steel screen really looks nice. This project is now on my "to do" list. Thanks for the informative post.

 

Mike

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I appreciate your post. I followed your lead and ordered the stainless. I had a K1200 and am familiar with tupperware removal. This was the first disassembly of the R bike and it went much quicker than I thought possible.

I put the screen in and had the bike back together in about one and half hours, including cutting and fitting the screen. And, I only had one screw left over when I finished. javascript:void(0)

Thanks for all the info. It was very helpful.javascript:void(0)

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  • 8 months later...

Great looking screen James. Inspired by the posts, and the accumulation of bugs in the cooler fins, I kept my eyes open this winter for screening material. But, being of Scottish descent, the material had to be functional and inexpensive. WalMart sells a Rubbermade letter stand made of aluminum mesh with a baked black finish for about $4. Worked just fine to stop penetrating bugs while allowing plenty of air flow. Can't figure out how to post pics but have them to email if anyone is interested.

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I am definitely going to do this when I get my bike. I need to remove the fairing anyway to install my headlight modulator so it looks like I will be able to kill 2 birds with one stone!

 

Riding home from work along the Delaware River on Rte 29 is a fantastic ride... but at night with the high beams on it can sometimes appear that you are riding through a snowstorm with the amount of bugs out there.

 

I wounder how often I will have to remove the screen for cleaning.... confused.gif

 

Oh yeah... and I decided to try the PMV-062-B screen for increased airflow and slightly better buggy protecton (I hope). After I get my bike and get everything installed I will try to post some pics. thumbsup.gif

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I did the same easy procedure as James but with different material. I used 304 stainless steel wire screen, .047 dia, .203 open width and 66% open area. A 12 x 12 piece runs about $12 from McMaster Carr and is enough to do at least two bikes. I thought it would be better to sacrifice collecting bugs for more air flow. There are other sizes available if you prefer.

1001068-oilcoolerscreen_1.jpg.4ba791920ec5fe620750d71a4ae7cfc5.jpg

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James - excellent write up thumbsup.gifthumbsup.gif I think you have started many of us on new projects - I too will be doing this upgrade.

 

Question - when the screen does get dirty, what would be the most effective way to clean it, I really can't see ripping the front tupperware off everytime the screen gets cruded up.

 

suggestions/pointers?

 

Luis

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James - excellent write up thumbsup.gifthumbsup.gif I think you have started many of us on new projects - I too will be doing this upgrade.

 

Question - when the screen does get dirty, what would be the most effective way to clean it, I really can't see ripping the front tupperware off everytime the screen gets cruded up.

 

suggestions/pointers?

 

Luis

 

 

I can only speak for the screen material I used; which was a 22 gauge perforated stainless steel sheet. It's rigid enough that it can be scrubbed clean without removing it. I folded the top edge over 90° to create a 1/2" lip which helped to increase the stiffness. I'd only remove it if I wanted to re-polish the surface.

 

I suspect some of the thicker woven stainless steel screens would be of similar stiffness, but from what was finding, nobody sold it in small quantities.

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I wounder how often I will have to remove the screen for cleaning....

 

I haven't found a need to remove the screen to clean it. The 22 gauge sheet is sufficiently rigid that it can be scrubbed cleen without removing it. When cutting out the basic shape for the screen, you may consider leaving an additional 1/2" of material along the top edge. This extra material can be folded over 90° to create a lip and add additional stiffness to the screen. I placed the screen in a vice and used a rubber mallet to bend the extra material to create the lip.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Took your info and installed a stainless I bought from Small Parts Inc. I went the next size larger for the holes as I do most of my riding in warm/hot weather.Looks great and many thanx for sharing the info.

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  • 3 months later...

Any update on the screen since you installed it as far as temp increase, ease of cleaning, etc.?

I've been trying to find some material around locally and am having a hard time. Home Depot & Lowes just stared at me with a big questioned look. I saw some grill material that had little hex shaped holes, used for an a/c air intake in a Dr.s office that would look nice but unable to find a source.

Is yours painted or bare metal? It would be nice to find some black material.

Thanks, Ken

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Good luck trying to find it at a local shop, I was seaching for more than a month and getting the same blank stares from people I asked. The site I ordered it from also offers similar screening material with %60 open area; the screen I purchased is only %40 pecent.

 

 

I haven't noticed any change in the temp. gauge since adding the oil cooler screen. No problems with cleaning it either; the stainless steel cleans up easily. The screening material I ordered came with an oily file and was a dull grey finish. I chose to polish mine up a bit, but to a mirror finish.

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Thanks Jim. I appreciate your information. I've got to do something, I live in what has to be one of the buggiest places in the country.

Check out the June '08 issue of BMW ON magazine, page 64. I assume you belong to BMWMOA that is.

I like how they say the material is available at big-box stores like Home Depot and Lowe's. Not in this town!

Take care,

Ken

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