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Timing hole cover - access


David Vale

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David Vale

As a novice mechanic with short stubby fingers, I struggle to replace the little rubber (?) cover for the timing hole. Easy enough to flick it out with a screwdriver or whatever - really hard to fit it back in.

 

Is there a trick to it, or any suggestions for an easier-to-handle replacement?

 

Thanks,

David Vale

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ShovelStrokeEd

Duct tape. Pick a color that matches.

I think I have 3 of those in the bell housing of my R1100RS.

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As a novice mechanic with short stubby fingers, I struggle to replace the little rubber (?) cover for the timing hole. Easy enough to flick it out with a screwdriver or whatever - really hard to fit it back in.

 

Is there a trick to it, or any suggestions for an easier-to-handle replacement?

 

Thanks,

David Vale

 

Some people spear the plug with a screwdriver or bradawl to hold it whilst replacing. Do not worry if it pushes through - some bikes have four or five in there.

 

I use aluminium foil tape. Duct tape would also work.

 

Andy

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I drilled a center hole and installed a 6-32 nylon screw that's about 1.5" long. I now have something to hold while pushing the bugger back into it's hole.

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Jim VonBaden

Or simply ignore it altogether. You do not need to use the timing plug hole to do a valve adjust on an oilhed/hexhead.

 

Simply use the arrows on the timing plug. When they are pointing out away from the bike check the rocker arms for loosness, and adjust the valves.

 

Jim cool.gif

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Simply use the arrows on the timing plug. When they are pointing out away from the bike check the rocker arms for loosness, and adjust the valves.

 

"arrows on the timing plug" ?? Maybe "arrows on the cam chain sprockets"

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Grip the flange of the plug with a pair of needlenose pliers or a hemostat. Position plug then press in with finger. A little silicon lube on the plug helps.

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David Vale

Thanks for the advice all. Sounds like the duct tape I used after the last time I pushed one in could become the permanent solution.

 

David

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Jim VonBaden
Simply use the arrows on the timing plug. When they are pointing out away from the bike check the rocker arms for loosness, and adjust the valves.

 

"arrows on the timing plug" ?? Maybe "arrows on the cam chain sprockets"

 

LOL Typing in a hurry is a bad idea when you type as badly as I do. dopeslap.gif

 

Yes, arrows on the timing chain gears in the heads:

 

Cam-Arrow-right-marked.jpg

 

Jim cool.gif

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I use a ratchet extension, make a small loop of duct tape and stick the plug on the end then hold it over the hole and use a screwdriver to press it on around the edges..works every time in short order.

 

Cheers

strat

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Simply use the arrows on the timing plug. When they are pointing out away from the bike check the rocker arms for loosness, and adjust the valves.

 

"arrows on the timing plug" ?? Maybe "arrows on the cam chain sprockets"

 

LOL Typing in a hurry is a bad idea when you type as badly as I do. dopeslap.gif

 

Yes, arrows on the timing chain gears in the heads:

 

Cam-Arrow-right-marked.jpg

 

Jim cool.gif

 

+1 You don't have to remove tupperware or fool with that plug. Saves a lot of time and swearing. grin.gif

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Steve_Witmer

I selected a 3/8 inch socket slightly larger than the hole so that I wouldn't push the plug through. Using an extension, you can push fairly firmly to get the last bit of the plug seated.

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