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My '05 R12RT Temp gauge still reads low.


Dick_at_Lake_Tahoe_NV

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Dick_at_Lake_Tahoe_NV

I went in yesterday and had to temp probe moved and supposedly the software update. It still reads 6-8 degrees low--Argh.

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I'll trade ya, mine reads 6-8 degrees to high. crazy.gif

 

Pat

 

Pat

 

Mine reads high too, most seem to read low, have you had the sensor moved, I was going to get this done at the 20,000km service.

Ian

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Mine read too low before the software update (about 3C too low) and afterwards it read too high (by about 3C). I should mention that I haven't had the sensor moved to the front yet (which is part of the official fix). I got the software update to fix the oil level indicator. I may ask them to move it when its in for its next service.

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Had both the software update and the sensor re-located to the front. It seems to be more accurate until the outside temperature hits 90 degrees +, then it starts to read too low.

 

That's o.k though, I'm still excited about having a bike with a gear indicator on the dash! grin.gif

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Mine has read low consistently since I got the bike...about 6 degrees. For the 6K service, I asked the tech to move the sensor. No one at the dealership could find the sensor. dopeslap.gif Now that I know it's consistently low, I just mentally adjust. The ambient air sensor on my HD (dial gauge) has always been off a little because of its position in the fairing. It makes me wonder how accurate the gauge in my Yukon is.

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Jeez guys, you're on a bike.....out in the open. If it feels hot, chances are that it is hot....if it feels cold, well it just might be cold. Such worry about the accuracy of the temp display ranks way up on the anal scale.....besides, if you're compairing your temp display to a roadside display, it's quite possible that the roadside thermometer is wrong. Dudes, just ride and enjoy.

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St0nkingByte
Jeez guys, you're on a bike.....out in the open. If it feels hot, chances are that it is hot....if it feels cold, well it just might be cold. Such worry about the accuracy of the temp display ranks way up on the anal scale.....besides, if you're compairing your temp display to a roadside display, it's quite possible that the roadside thermometer is wrong. Dudes, just ride and enjoy.

I'd be 100% in your camp if it wasn't for the darn blinking snowflake that warns you about ice when its actually 40F out.

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Jeez guys, you're on a bike.....out in the open. If it feels hot, chances are that it is hot....if it feels cold, well it just might be cold. Such worry about the accuracy of the temp display ranks way up on the anal scale.....besides, if you're compairing your temp display to a roadside display, it's quite possible that the roadside thermometer is wrong. Dudes, just ride and enjoy.

 

Maybe it's just me. But, you pay that much for a bike; and, the additional cost of the "on-board computer" you kind of expect those things to work properly. Yes, even the temp and fuel gauge! Both of which continue to frustrate me. frown.gif

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ShovelStrokeEd

Here we go again.

I payed XXXXX dollars for my bike, therefore, everything should work perfectly.

 

Actually, the temperature readout is working fine. It is giving you a reading. The location and type of temperature sensor could be causing some offset from what the true temperature is, but that is entirely normal. A bi-metal thermocouple produces a very tiny voltage that needs amplification to be interpreted by the readout device. This also needs to be cold junction compensated at the wiring connections to provide a truly accurate system.

 

Other means of temperature sensing can also be problematic in terms of linearity of response. A lot depends on how much of those XXXXX dollars went into the temperature sensing module and its components.

 

You will be far happier when you realize you bought a motorcycle, whose function is to transport you down the road. Now, if you had paid 18K for a temperature sensor and it was off by 3 deg C at 25 deg C, then you would have something to bitch about.

 

I'll stay with sweating=hot, shivering=cold. A quick look at a thermometer, available at many banks and other road signs, and I have a pretty good idea. BTW, 40 degree F air temperature doesn't mean there won't be ice on the road if it has been colder overnight.

 

As to the fuel gauge, you have a linear device attempting to display a non-linear function (the shape of the tank means the amount of fuel remaining at any given level varies). Good luck with that one.

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Here we go again.

I payed XXXXX dollars for my bike, therefore, everything should work perfectly.

 

Actually, the temperature readout is working fine. It is giving you a reading. The location and type of temperature sensor could be causing some offset from what the true temperature is, but that is entirely normal. A bi-metal thermocouple produces a very tiny voltage that needs amplification to be interpreted by the readout device. This also needs to be cold junction compensated at the wiring connections to provide a truly accurate system.

 

Other means of temperature sensing can also be problematic in terms of linearity of response. A lot depends on how much of those XXXXX dollars went into the temperature sensing module and its components.

 

You will be far happier when you realize you bought a motorcycle, whose function is to transport you down the road. Now, if you had paid 18K for a temperature sensor and it was off by 3 deg C at 25 deg C, then you would have something to bitch about.

 

I'll stay with sweating=hot, shivering=cold. A quick look at a thermometer, available at many banks and other road signs, and I have a pretty good idea. BTW, 40 degree F air temperature doesn't mean there won't be ice on the road if it has been colder overnight.

 

As to the fuel gauge, you have a linear device attempting to display a non-linear function (the shape of the tank means the amount of fuel remaining at any given level varies). Good luck with that one.

 

Yes sir, you're mostly correct! And, if it was only two or three degrees I probably wouldn't complain about it so much. However, even after several software upgrades it is somewhere around 12 degrees off. The fuel guage is another sore spot, more than the temp. When it says I out of fuel there's still several gallons left. How far can I go is a best guess based on the speed/riding style. So, having made some sacrifices to own this particular bike; yes, it's an issue for me.

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ShovelStrokeEd

OK, it's 12 degrees off, I'm assuming that is 12 deg F. So, is it reading high or low? My best guess is it is probably high. That has more to do with the location of the sensor than anything else although the type of sensor can be important as well. On a motorcycle, this can be a difficult thing to get right as there are a number of sources of heat that can skew the reading as can things like direct sunlight, cooling air flow, rain, etc. I'm not sure I could do much better than BMW has done without spending a good deal more than they have. Tell you what, I have a $400 calibrated temperature sensor with a special ambient temperature probe. On the way to work tomorrow, I stick the readout to the top of my tank bag and play with some probe sensor positions, hopefully without killing myself in the process, and let you know the various temperatures I encounter.

 

I do believe your dealer can calibrate your fuel gauge. There is a procedure for this, involving emptying the tank and pouring in exactly 1 gallon of fuel and then resetting something. It requires the use of the Moditec (sp) and may eat one of your flashes but it can be done. I'd approach the dealer about doing this under warranty.

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John Bentall

Ed, I've had the sensor relocated. When it was in the rear mudguard above the muffler it would read a certain temperature when in motion - and when one stopped at lights it would rise by, say, 7 to 8 degrees F.

Now that the sensor is relocated in the front fairing above the engine exactly the same thing happens.

We can agree that, unlike an automobile, there are precious few places to locate the sensor on a bike where the engineer can get a good reading unaffacted by heat soak or wind chill.

 

I've given up on the sensor - love the bike!

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Actually, I find myself agreeing with everyone on this thread. confused.gif It should work if you pay for it. On the other hand, who cares if I get an accurate temp reading! Am I cooking something or is it a compulsive need toward gadgetry? Besides, if it's cold or hot I generally know it.

The fuel gauge is another question, but mine is okay and actually corresponds to trip meter. My only concern is that if this stuff doesn't work properly will it cause other computer-based systems onboard to misfunction? All these gadgets are presented as state-of-the-art technology and part of the sales/engineering hype. What's the point if they don't work? Why not leave them off and clear this thread?

When stuff fails to perform it fuels customer dissatisfaction. Does the factory need more dissatisfied customers?

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If BWM can't engineer a simple function such as ambient temperature and fuel level indication correctly, it doesn't give me much confidence in the more complex functions on the bike such as fuel injection and anti-skid brakes. I agree, if they can't do it right, don't put it on the bike.

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My RT must be different .... as long as I am underway, the temp indicator gives what appears to be a more or less accurate reading. If I stop the bike, at a light or to gas up, the temp goes up but eventually goes back to the "real" temp - may take 5 minutes of highway riding. I did have a funky situation where the temp was reading 10 deg low, but when I stepped thru the OBC menu the thermometer started increasing at 1 deg overy 2-3 seconds. Of all the OBC functions, the temp is probably the least useful in terms of giving info that is of use to me, with the exception of the snowflake warning. I ride in the mountains in the winter and I really like to know if temps are approaching 40 -- black ice in valleys and shade are deadly.

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ShovelStrokeEd

OK, John, you do it. Show us how easy it is. I'll spot you a laptop computer and a thermocouple interface. Design the circuit, source a sensor, figure out where/how to mount it, determine how often to update the reading and what degree of precision, set alarm points at appropriate temperatures. If you can bring in a unit with a decent display that provides reasonable accuracy for less than $100, I'll buy the first one.

 

BTW, I did take my highly accurate temperature sensor on the ride into work this morning. In the shade it showed 59 deg F with the bike parked. Moved into sunlight with the sensor resting on top of my Marsee bag, no map pocket, right up to 62. Moving down the road with a little air coming up over the top of the bag, 63 to 64, moved the sensor up into the air flow coming off my windscreen and back down to 59. Slipped it up under the triple clamp where the radiant heat from the headers and oil cooler live and it went to 74. Down at the radiator air outlets on the sides of the fairing, 92. Coolant temp was the normal 175 degrees. Speeds varied from 45 or so to 85. The sensor, btw, is a special one designed to measure ambient air and is shielded with holes on the sides to allow some little flow over the sensor. The unit is calibrated and certified to read within 0.01% of full scale of 150 deg C. Last calibration was March 18, 2007.

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JohnBeaven

You are absolutely correct. thumbsup.gif

Too many people sweat the small stuff.

 

But for the record - my temperature sensor is under the rear mud guard, the bike has had no software upgrades and the temperature sensor "appears" to read 2degrees celsius low. BFD

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