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Plug Wires


Albert

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I noticed somewhere that BMW used to put a special tool in the RT tool kit for removing the plug wire/primary coil from the spark plugs. My 2006 tool kit has no such tool so (unless I was shorted), I'm guessing I'm not the lone ranger here. So what do you use to remove the plug wires instead of the BMW special tool?

 

By the way I did my first valve adjustment last weekend and found that I could the a pair of 90 degree angle needle nose pliers into the slots used by the special tool. Not my preferred technique but it did get the job done.

 

Thanks,

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I didn't get one with my 05 RT. I did get a bespoke piece from someone on the list who makes them out of metal just because it looked cool to me. There are lots of people using various methods of doing this that don't involve the plastic BMW tool. If you search the archives I think you will find some other suggestions.

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You GS guys have all the cool stuff. No tool tray and no plug wire puller evident on my RT. Just have an almost empty plastic tool bag held to the rear fender by a couple of rubber straps.

 

Look under your tool tray. That's where I found mine.
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my bike was missing that tool too. In the US market I believe the 06 RT's came with a three piece tool kit; screw driver, torx wrench, and oil cap tool. frown.gif

 

If you don't need a substantial tool like the fine aluminum tools offered you can order the earlier tool kit plastic remover tool from your dealer. It was only $2.00 and if has worked fine. If you want a better tool the plastic is still suitable for the carried tool kit.

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Al,

 

I believe the part number was 12137673248 for the tool.

Yeah, but don't waste your time & money. The plastic one that comes with the bike is junk. Get the Parnes one or the BMW service tool metal one. Part # 90 88 6 123 561
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Ken,

As stated before I acknowledged the more expensive metal pullers are better, but for the casual DIY user the plastic OEM tool is adequate. Labeling it as junk is an opinion that doesn't square with my experience with it. I was just trying to offer a less expensive alternative for anybody interested.

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for the casual DIY user the plastic OEM tool is adequate.
No, it isn't. I broke my plastic puller the second time I used it. It is junk because it is not strong enough to use more than a couple of times. Furthermore, before mine broke I had a heck of a time just getting it to grip the grip the coil so I could pull it out. I ended up getting a metal puller.
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I pull them with an open ended wrench wrapped in a cloth so it wouldn't mar the plastic or the valve cover. Absurdly easy and no special tool necessary. It was one of bigger metrics, 17mm 21mm? I forget.

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for the casual DIY user the plastic OEM tool is adequate.
No, it isn't. I broke my plastic puller the second time I used it. It is junk because it is not strong enough to use more than a couple of times. Furthermore, before mine broke I had a heck of a time just getting it to grip the grip the coil so I could pull it out. I ended up getting a metal puller.
Then you were most likely not using it properly. I have used mine too many times to count and it still works fine, doing the job at hand. Yes, the metal one is better for the shop tool box. But, your assessment is contrary to what most experience with the use of this little tool kit tool.
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