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Replacing both shocks


outpost22

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Can someone give me a rough idea how much time should be allotted for changing a '96 R1100RT front and rear shock?

Figure I have a bike lift and good tools, including air equipment and a Haynes manual.

Are there any special "BMW" tools needed?

Thanks! wave.gif

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I just changed the shocks on my 05 RT and I think it took me about 3 hours from start to finish. It was not a race just trying to do it right the first time.

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Did you need any special tools or techniques to replace them? I have a 2003RT and will be wanting to change to aftermarket shocks some day. Any thing you did which you could have done easier with some advance knowledge or help?

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Last summer I installed new Wilburs front and back.

 

No special tools required. I had to file a few thou off the top rear mount, and then it slid right in.

 

A couple of hours should do it. It wasn't rocket science.

 

It improved the bike so much, I've decided to keep it until the wheels fall off. thumbsup.gif

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Andy

No special tools required for this job. It is straightforward and actually not hard at all. Just try to have everything you need within reach. I would recommend that you change your shocks before the OEM's are shot. You will then be able to sell the aftermarket shocks when you sell the bike or put them on your new bike.

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Thanks Smokey and KeithB! Sounds very straight forward, no major removals or adjustments other than remove old, take out, and replace with new! I have read so many good comments on this board about quality after market shocks that I would prefer sooner than later! But am constantly juggling my budget to keep everything going, especially three daughters in college! crazy.gifgrin.gif

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My pleasure. On my Wilber shocks I had a nitrogen canister (low speed/High speed dampening) that I had to mount on the frame along with the preload adjuster so in other words I had two extra pieces to mount vs. one which is usually the preload adjuster. We strapped the Nit.C. to the frame and the preload adjuster where the original one was mounted under the seat. My bike rides like a new one now. Big difference. Have fun with your shock install.

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Andy,

The rear shock is very simple. The fuel tank has to be moved back just a bit to access the top mount of the front shock. Otherwise very easy.

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If you're installing aftermarket shocks that have a different arrangement of reservoirs (or more) than the stock shocks, allow some extra time to figure out where things go.

 

The other bit of advice is to make sure the rear wheel is supported when you disconnect the rear shock. If it's not, it will drop the rear Paralever to an extreme angle. A few hundred miles after I did this, one of the driveshaft u-joints on my bike failed, expensively. Coincidence perhaps, but best avoided.

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Dave

Great advice on supporting the paralever. We put a floor jack under the brake rotor so it would not fall on the floor. Ouch on the U joint. Sorry to hear that.

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Well, the deed is done. It took 3 1/2 hours to complete. I guess my hands are slower than they used to be. frown.gif

 

Anyway, no problems to speak of. I did brace the final drive per instructions. thumbsup.gif

 

Thanks for your replys

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Congratulations on your shock installation. Now you need to get the shock setup for your weight, riding style, etc. This is the most important part.

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Congratulations on your shock installation. Now you need to get the shock setup for your weight, riding style, etc. This is the most important part.

 

Thanks,

These are OEM shocks and I have the original settings from the first set. That's where I'll start the settings with this (rear) one.

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