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Firefight911

R12 series final drive fluid swap (lots of pics!!)

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Switz

I changed all fluids at 700 miles on the 2007 RT. They were all fairly dark with some metal finds. At 3,000 miles, the fluids were at least 80% cleaner of small particles and the color was getting better. At 6,000 miles everything looked clear of particles and the color was good. I will probably stay on a 3,000 mile service interval. Oil is still cheaper than main bearings.

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texasaggie97

Do you ever ride that thing. Wow the bike looks brand new. I really wanted to say that post like this make this site worth its weight in gold. I do not have new bike were I needed this info but when people like you do great posts like this people like me who do not make the kind of money it cost to maintenance one of these machines are so grateful. Thank you so very much and this was great.

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johnlt

I performed the FD oil change and Tranny oil change using Phil's instructions and it was almost a piece of cake. I had a devil of a time getting the splined shaft back into the u joint coupler. Really had to stick my fingers in there and move around the u joint to get good alignment. Finally got it ok but had to do quite a bit of grease clean-up. The speed sensor had some small pieces of metal on the magnet and the oil was very black but no other metal or contaminates that I could see. The tranny oil looked very clean. Replaced both with BMW synthetic 75w-140w oil per Iron Horse BMW recommendations. I know the discussions about 75/90 vs 75/140 but there position was that either would be ok in the FD but needed the 140 in the tranny so recommended I use synthetic 75/140 in both. Possibly the 140 may be better for the desert environment I live in. Thanks Phil

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sardineone

John, I think you did ok. The factory CD manual for my R12ST specifies Castrol SAF-XO oil for the rear end of my identical power train. Looked it up on-line and that oil is a synthetic 70W-140 grade gear lube. Where people are getting that 70W-90 for the rear ends is ok beats me? My owner's manual spec's straight 90W Hypoid gear lube for the tranny. But I like synthetic gear oil and guess what? I put the synthetic 70W-140 in my tranny as well. thumbsup.gif

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Bernie

George, I think you got the wrong spec's. If you check Castrol German Website and check the specs for the recommended gear oil in the BMW repair/service CD, you will find out that it is a 75W90 synthetic gear oil.

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/multipleproductsection.do?categoryId=9014025&contentId=7027228

<SAF-XO

<Vollsynthetisches Getriebeöl SAE 75W-90

Of course, you may be talking about the gear oil for the R1200C Cruiser bikes (Olheads), which is not the same as the R1200 Hexhead motor.

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RedMac

There was a pretty long article in the BMW MOA magazine this month. They were VERY specific in the mag that the correct oil for the final drive is 75W-90, NOT 75W-140. Since I put 75W-140 in mine last fall before I stored it, I'll be changing it again this spring to 75W-90....

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johnlt

I have a lot of respect for Iron Horse BMW here in Tucson. The temps in Tucson are nothing like Germany so I'll go with their recommendation for the 75/140. "General specs" are just that and may not be appropriate for "specific" environments so listening to local knowledge makes sense to me.

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Boffin
George, I think you got the wrong spec's. If you check Castrol German Website and check the specs for the recommended gear oil in the BMW repair/service CD, you will find out that it is a 75W90 synthetic gear oil.

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/multipleproductsection.do?categoryId=9014025&contentId=7027228

<SAF-XO

<Vollsynthetisches Getriebeöl SAE 75W-90

Of course, you may be talking about the gear oil for the R1200C Cruiser bikes (Olheads), which is not the same as the R1200 Hexhead motor.

 

Castrol, for reasons best known to them, have different formulations for different markets even though the oils have the same names. Use your local suppliers/websites to check specs.

 

Andy

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sardineone

Castrol, for reasons best known to them, have different formulations for different markets even though the oils have the same names

 

Maybe that's what has happened. From a foggy memory I think I first looked up SAF-XO on the Castrol Australia website. The SAF-XO isn't listed currently on the Australian or USA site. My appologies for contributing to the web of mis-information. eek.gif

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99Roadster

Here's what I found from perusing the Castrol site;

 

SAF-XO = 75W-90

 

SAF-XJ = 75W-140

 

My dealer also put in the 75W-140. I may attempt to change it the Spring, not sure if it's truly worth the hassle.

 

The following is a datasheet which looks to be sourced from Castrol UK.

 

SAF-XO

________________________________________________________________________________

 

Synthetic Final Drive Lubricant

DESCRIPTION

 

Castrol SAF-XO is a fully synthetic multigrade final drive lubricant with excellent low temperature performance, load carrying ability and resistance to foaming at high temperatures and sustained high speeds. It also provides exceptional high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. SAF-XO is Castrol's prime recommendation for a full synthetic lubricant for final drives in heavy commercial vehicles.

 

APPLICATION

 

Castrol SAF-XO is specially designed and fully approved by BMW for use in all BMW final drives fitted with conventional (non limited slip) differentials. Castrol SAF-XJ should be used for BMW final drives fitted with limited slip differentials.

 

It is also fully approved to MAN 342 SL+ for back axles.

 

Castrol SAF-XO replaces Castrol G728 and is suitable for other applications where a high performance API GL5 lubricant is specified.

 

PERFORMANCE

 

API Service Level GL5

 

MAN 342 SL+ Approved back axles

Scania STO:1 Approved

Alpina Approved

BMW Approved

ZF TE-ML 05B and 12B Approved

________________________________________________________________________________

 

TYPICAL CHARACTERISTICS

 

SAE Viscosity Rating 75W/90

Relative Density @ 20º C 0.855

Viscosity @ 40º C cSt 103.7

Viscosity @ 100º C cSt 15.7

Viscosity Index 162

Flash Point (COC) ºC 220

Pour Point ºC -51

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marcopolo

Here's an excerpt from a BMW USA Service Bulletin for the 1200 GS:

 

"BMWMotorrad

USA

Service Information Bulletin

Subject: Bearing play at the rear wheel drive

 

Date: February 2005

Bulletin #33 001 05 (011)

Source: 33 74/2004

BMW Motorrad USA Service and Technical

Contact: Respective Aftersales Business Consultant

R 1200 GS

 

...When filling the rear drive assembly with oil,

pour in the defined quantity (0.25 l for initial fill, or 0.23 l for oil changes) through the bore for the ABS sensor.

We highly recommend using BMW Super Synthetic Gear oil. 75W 90, P/N 07 51 0 394 082."

 

If someone is suggesting other than 75W90 synthetic, I'd ask to see where BMW has put that in writing. To this point no one has been able to find such a document.

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Rob F.

Just had my 600 mile service done. They changed the FD with 75/140 syn. This is a top ten dealer. Here is my question. Should I change the trans. oil at this point? Going forward, how often would you do both the FD and the trans? Thanks.

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marcopolo
Just had my 600 mile service done. They changed the FD with 75/140 syn. This is a top ten dealer. Here is my question. Should I change the trans. oil at this point? Going forward, how often would you do both the FD and the trans? Thanks.

 

The intervals for trans fluid changes are spelled out in the maintenance schedule -- it's "every 40,000 kms (24,000 miles) or every two years"; FD fluid changes are not spelled out in the maintenance schedule, unless they've recently been added (the requirement for a FD fluid change at the 600 mile running-in check was covered in a service bulletin, I believe. After 600 miles, BMW is silent on FD fluid changes). I'm probably going to do mine as often as trans fluid changes.

 

I'm no petroleum engineer, but I find it a bit odd that your dealer would use 75W140 in the FD, and not the 75W90 that BMW recommends? Aside from it being called out in the service bulletin I mentioned above, it's also on the BMW parts fiche (available online) where you find the FD diagram.

Edited by marcopolo

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johnlt

My experience with my recent FD and Tranny change was that the FD was black and really needed changing (11K miles) but the Tranny looked like new oil. In talking with the Iron Horse service rep, he indicated that all transmissions are "run in" at the factory for a considerable amount of time with break-in oil, then changed out to new oil prior to shipment. I personally plan on changing out both my FD and tranny every 12K to 15K miles.

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RocketJohn

rear diff changes in our cars are required at 30k... 24k feels right for the BMW bikes...

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Firefight911

I am adding this to my original post so we can keep the relevant information together.

 

I did a 6k service to my R12GS Adventure yesterday. Part of this was the final drive fluid. Now, mind you, this is a 2007 Adventure. This bike falls under the new guidelines of a one time swap of the fluid at the 600 mile service. The below attached photos might raise a few eyebrows! It did mine.

 

Now, the 600 mile service was performed by a Texas BMW dealer prior to my taking ownership so we have that question answered.

 

What did I find?

 

After draining the fluid, I found that I could only get a grand total of 150 cc out of the drive unit. Uhhhhh, where did the rest go????????????

 

The drive was warm when I began and the drain was left to its own vices for an hour while I worked on other stuff on the bike.

 

Additionally, the magnetic drain plug was completely full of fine metallic particulate. No chunks or significant shavings, jsut a bunch of "powdery" metallic stuff.

 

And get a look at the color!!!

 

I post this to raise an awareness of what I perceive (without ANY way to prove otherwise!!!) what may have gone on here.

 

1. The FD fluid was never drained at the 600 mile service and was not filled with the proper amount from the factory.

 

2. It was drained and replaced only to the level of the drain plug after reassembly. This would be in place of it being filled through the proper place - the speed sensor hole.

 

Now, let me put this out there from the get go, I am NOT advocating or trying to start some conspiracy theory or clandestine dealership scam or claiming that BMW is this or that. I merely put it out there for information. Do with it what you will but don't allege that I am on some witch hunt or otherwise.

 

I called my dealer and advise of my findings and they were none to thrilled to hear what I found. I had them confirm all fluid capacities for me and verify that no changes for my particular model had been established. Everything remains as my original post except the fluid is 75w90 instead of 75w140.

 

Here ya go:

 

In process

 

270790694_uHdsJ-M.jpg

 

Draining

 

270790826_WR264-L.jpg

 

Isn't the color lovely!! Note that it rests just below 150 cc. Accounting for the slight amount I could not scrape off the drain pan, we'll call it 150.

 

270790936_etvQp-L.jpg

 

You can see some of the metallic sheen in the oil as I drain it away.

 

270791290_3EMXQ-L.jpg

 

Ahhhhhh, now that's better!!!!

 

270791415_9cAJj-M.jpg

 

 

In closing, change your fluid. Verify that it was done. Verify that it was done properly!!!

 

The rest of the service went flawlessly. I was supposed to go for a good 500 mile day ride but decided against it for a variety of reasons. Mostly due to the fact that 500 miles would put me precariously close to the cords on the TKC's I currently have. Heading out the door for a couple hundred and ending up at the dealer for a new set of Conti Trail Attacks. thumbsup.gif

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Crazy_Canuck

Thanks for the update Phil!

 

Did you use your special "Patent Pending" funnel to refill the final drive?

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Limecreek

Thank you for the update!

 

I believe we will see more and more final drive failures as this generation of R bikes age.

 

I completed my 24K service last weekend and part of that service was a fluid change of the final drive--the third change since new. The color of the fluid for each of the 3 fluid changes look just like it does in your pictures and I too have metal suspended in the gear oil. I haven't found any large metal pieces, just very small almost brass colored specs.

 

I like my RT and plan to put at least 80K on her before shopping for a new one. I do not expect the FD will make 80K, so I am going to rebuild it at 40K and write it off as a cost of ownership.

 

Thanks again for the pictures Phil.

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gettysburg

What's the mileage on you GS? I changed my FD fluid this past weekend (400mi. shy of 12,000) recovered ~210-220cc of drained fluid. There was a fair amount of fine particles in the fluid, but at least it still had a purple/red hue to it.

 

Did your magnetic drain plug have a recess in it? Mine did and I was a bit concerned that there might have been a magnetic slug that worked loose inside the final driveeek.gif Maybe it's just the design; since the drain plug was still attracted to the the torx bit.

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Firefight911

There was 5992 miles on it at the 6k service.

 

Yes there is a recess in the plug. Mine was filled with the metallic "powder" I referenced.

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DonB

Nice documentation.

One question though. Do you actually ride those bikes? They are the cleanest ridden bikes I have ever seen!

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gettysburg
There was 5992 miles on it at the 6k service.

 

Yes there is a recess in the plug. Mine was filled with the metallic "powder" I referenced.

 

My plug was filled with something grey in color & with the consistency of petroleum jelly.

 

The replacement BMW gear oil looks like you could pour it over pancakes. It's probably a good thing it has such a distinctive odor.

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Semper_Fi

This is completely off topic but relevant to the latest comments - on my Goldwing i would change the final drive fluid with every oil change (OCD)- and each time i did there was always a very fine metallic paste on the drain bolt.

 

Just an FYI

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Jim VonBaden
Thank you for the update!

 

I believe we will see more and more final drive failures as this generation of R bikes age.

 

I completed my 24K service last weekend and part of that service was a fluid change of the final drive--the third change since new. The color of the fluid for each of the 3 fluid changes look just like it does in your pictures and I too have metal suspended in the gear oil. I haven't found any large metal pieces, just very small almost brass colored specs.

 

I like my RT and plan to put at least 80K on her before shopping for a new one. I do not expect the FD will make 80K, so I am going to rebuild it at 40K and write it off as a cost of ownership.

 

Thanks again for the pictures Phil.

 

There is no reason to "rebuild" a perfectly functioning FD with no indication of failure other than a little sheen in the oil. dopeslap.gif

 

Mine has over 42K, as do dozens of members of my club, and the only failures were two low miles bikes.

 

IMHO if they go 40K they will go 80K without failure!

 

Jim cool.gif

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Limecreek
Thank you for the update!

 

I believe we will see more and more final drive failures as this generation of R bikes age.

 

I completed my 24K service last weekend and part of that service was a fluid change of the final drive--the third change since new. The color of the fluid for each of the 3 fluid changes look just like it does in your pictures and I too have metal suspended in the gear oil. I haven't found any large metal pieces, just very small almost brass colored specs.

 

I like my RT and plan to put at least 80K on her before shopping for a new one. I do not expect the FD will make 80K, so I am going to rebuild it at 40K and write it off as a cost of ownership.

 

Thanks again for the pictures Phil.

 

There is no reason to "rebuild" a perfectly functioning FD with no indication of failure other than a little sheen in the oil. dopeslap.gif

 

Mine has over 42K, as do dozens of members of my club, and the only failures were two low miles bikes.

 

IMHO if they go 40K they will go 80K without failure!

 

Jim cool.gif

 

We all make our choices Jim.

 

Mine is nothing more than a plan of prevention for a well known weakness of the brand.

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MarkEngland
So I changed my “lifetime” final drive oil! Could someone define “lifetime” for me!!!

Phil, When I had my 6K at Ozzie's I ask the same question and the mechanic said I should change it at 12K or 18K, but it should be changed. The way he explained it made sense. Lifetime is until the warrenty runs out and is the 45 minutes it will take him worth the risk.

 

So, I set aside the extra funds to cover the 'lifetime' fluid change in a few months. I know I should change it myself, but ....

 

Nice write up.

Mark

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chaparral

I changed my final drive yesterday @ 20k miles. Had about 150ml of fluid,SB bout 220 ml. It was clear with no metallic sheen. It was a lower amount than I expected and I let it drain overnight. I then replaced it with 75/140 synthetic BMW oil per the recommendation of a top ten dealer. My maintenance cd states to use 75w, but then again the cd is 2 1/2 years old. Also at the time of the 600 mile dealer service the final drive was not in the queue for a change. I guess progress prevails in pursuit of reliability. Go figger!

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marcopolo
I then replaced it with 75/140 synthetic BMW oil per the recommendation of a top ten dealer. My maintenance cd states to use 75w, but then again the cd is 2 1/2 years old.

 

Your maintenance CD is correct. The recommended FD fluid is 75W90 GL5 synthetic. In fact, the specific recommendation is for SAF-XO, a Castrol product not readily available in the US it would seem. BMW US has a BMW-branded 75W90 synthetic for this purpose (and has recommended same in a tech service bulletin). Ask your "top ten" dealer to show you where -- in writing -- BMW recommends 75W140 for your FD. I'm confident they won't be able to.

 

I sound like a broken record on this question. I guess having a FD fail 2,500 miles from home will do that. Having done some research, there is only one fluid recommended by the people who built your bike, and it's not 75W140. That said, what you put in is your business, but at least you should expect to get the right answer from your dealership insofar as what the manufacturer recommends. If your dealer chooses to ignore what BMW specifies and recommends something else, I'd ask on what basis they made such a recommendation. In some cases some owners have reported that dealers simply sold what they had in stock (75W140), and claimed not to know that BMW US even supplied a 75W90 synthetic.

Edited by marcopolo

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JayW
In some cases some owners have reported that dealers simply sold what they had in stock (75W140), and claimed not to know that BMW US even supplied a 75W90 synthetic.

 

Yep - my experience exactly. I ordered the 75W90 from an online dealer and that is what is now in my FD.

 

Jay

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medic319

Thanks for the step-by-step. It proved to be very useful whe I changed my fluid. I did it 3 days ago as part of my 12000 mile service and found it to be very simple. I had some "peach fuzz" on the speed sensor, but the oil looked good and there were no chunks of metal anywhere. Refilled with BMW super synthetic 75w-90.

 

BTW... I bought a graduated funnel with on-off valve and flexible hose with a spout that fits EXACTLY into the speed sensor hole while at Advance Auto Parts.

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h2000fb

Great write-up. Will be doing mine shortly!

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SWB

Well, I'm sure "real happy" I read this thread. I just picked up a "new" (to me) 2005 R1200RT with 42K miles, which looks and runs like new and has all the dealer service stamps where they should be. I thought to myself "Gee, what a nice feeling. This will be the first bike I've bought in a long, long time that wasn't a rehab project. I can even let it go until 48K before I figure out how to unwrap the R1200RT tupperware." Well, not exactly, I guess. Having finished up a fairly extensive overhaul of my 2001 R1100RT-P less than a year ago, including the transmission (rebuilt to better than new by Tom Cutter of PA and Bruno of Canada), the clutch, real engine seals, most bearings, and incorporating just about every recommendation and tip from mirror tethers to GS intake tubs, I was ready to ride for a while and rest the "wrenching skills". But hearing all this makes it pretty well guaranteed it'll be another "wrenching Christmas" (in more ways than one; my wife will freak if she sees me start breaking down the "new" bike). Since my bike has 42K miles plus BMW's "superb service schedule", this stuff about "Lifetime" fluids is not real good news.

 

By the way, for you with the predilection for custom oils and other "special additives" to make your bikes last forever, my R1100 tranmission failed 800 miles after removing clean, no-metal-shavings transmission oil and replacing it with Redline Heavy Gear 75-250W "Shockproof" oil. Seemed like the right thing to do, but the failure was both catastrophic and unusual. The BMW shop claimed the oil had broken down ("pink watery liquid" was the description), and the gears had spalling like as if someone took a metal punch and ball pinned hammer to the center of most of the second and third gears dogs.

 

Tom said that he'd never seen anything like it, and members of the bmwst community similarly claimed it "had to be" a manufacturing problem. Yet that gearbox had made it through 50K miles of multiple LEO's (and probably a rodeo or two, judging from the "custom body work") and failed ONLY after the fluid change.

 

Could it be something other than Redline or the viscosity I chose to put into the case? Sure, but at this point, I've learned my engineering lesson. Tom Cutter recommended Castrol 80-90W for the rebuilt box. His opinion was that going to a heavier (let alone 75W250) gear oil was fraught with all sorts of risks. He said (paraphrasing) "heavier isn't always better, i.e. there a certain amount of protection that comes from the splash effect" of a lighter oil, and that BMW engineers have engineered the Getrag transmissions for 80-90W, not 75W-250. I thought the point was valid. In light of my limited personal experience and Tom's extensive mechanical experience with the Getrags, I thought this opinion was "authortative" enough that I don't even need to review BMW service bulletins.

 

I think we "home mechanics" (and we have some hugely talented folks in the community) sometimes need to leave well enough alone, and enjoy the machine as we bought it. It's the nature of the best that we're all ways looking for an "edge", something to improve or preserve or set our machines apart from every other. But again, I've learned my lesson. I'll go factory spec on fluids, though I don't think I'll sleep well until I've changed out the final drive, and maybe even the tranny oil on the "new" R1200RT. The first R&R was a both valuable and painful learning experience, but I don't want to do it again for a while. Oil is cheaper than Getrag gears and forks.

 

Then again, to each their own.

 

- Scott

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bobbobtar

Why not make it a practice to change the FD fluid every time we replace the rear tire,1/3 of dismantling done plus whats the cost of a good FD oil $15?

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JayW
Why not make it a practice to change the FD fluid every time we replace the rear tire,1/3 of dismantling done plus whats the cost of a good FD oil $15?

 

That would amount to a FD fluid change every 5-6K miles, which is wasteful and unecessary. No one has shown that changing the FD oil that often is beneficial. It should be changed at 600 miles, then most of us change it every 12K-24K miles after that.

 

Jay

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Redbrick
Why not make it a practice to change the FD fluid every time we replace the rear tire,1/3 of dismantling done plus whats the cost of a good FD oil $15?

 

:thumbsup: Yep.....That's my plan......

Edited by Redbrick

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Indy Dave
If you have the equipment (block and tackle and an A frame) you can place a sling around the front wheel (after removing the small front mudguard) and raise the bike to almost verticle (requires two people) and drain the final drive oil. Doing this it is just a matter of replacing the plug, removing the muffler and rear wheel and replacing the oil as described. I did mine like this.

Ian thumbsup.gif

 

This is a slick idea! Using a friends lift truck and a strap on the front wheel- this is how I'll be changing out the FD on my 06 RT this week.

 

 

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Redbrick
If you have the equipment (block and tackle and an A frame) you can place a sling around the front wheel (after removing the small front mudguard) and raise the bike to almost verticle (requires two people) and drain the final drive oil. Doing this it is just a matter of replacing the plug, removing the muffler and rear wheel and replacing the oil as described. I did mine like this.

Ian thumbsup.gif

 

This is a slick idea! Using a friends lift truck and a strap on the front wheel- this is how I'll be changing out the FD on my 06 RT this week.

 

 

Wow...Seems to me this is more difficult than on the center stand,rotating the muffler, pulling the wheel, etc., etc..Particularly if you just change the fluid every rear tire change.....Takes two folks to string it up too.. :P

Edited by Redbrick

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JMR

Quick question to someone who has changed their 1200RT FD oil: ...Going all the way back to the first page of this thread to the pictures showing the rubber boot that pulls out when lowering the FD to drain the oil; is the white stuff around the edges of the boot flanges some kind of gasket material/sealant? and does it need to be replaced/refreshed? And if yes, what is recommended? (Saw the same white stuff on the boot in JVB's maintenence DVD where he's changing FD oil.)

Thanks.

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GordonB

That is the grease applied to the splines.

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Indy Dave

 

 

Wow...Seems to me this is more difficult than on the center stand,rotating the muffler, pulling the wheel, etc., etc..Particularly if you just change the fluid every rear tire change.....Takes two folks to string it up too.. :P

 

It must be paralax . . seems so simple to me - ride over, FD is warm, take one of our straps, loop it through the front wheel (removed mud guard) lift, drain. lower and fill :) no muss no fuss

 

Already have a new rear tire. Plus - IMO FD change every rear tire change is overkill,but to each his own YMMV. Your point is well taken about doing a FD change when doing a tire change.

 

It's quite possible, however that my warehouse buddy (an engineer) may veto the lift idea - he likes takin stuff apart

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Redbrick

I guess if you have all the equipment......... :thumbsup:...String 'er up......

Make sure your gas cap is snapped shut..... :grin:

 

Fluid change interval will depend on tire mileage....I've been getting more than 10M miles out of a set so the change isn't that often and for a few bucks in fluid that I already have, crush washer and new locking nut it's not a big rip and I can keep a close eye on conditions in there......

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Indy Dave

Phil - good point about the fuel.... Hmmmm

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Firefight911
I guess if you have all the equipment......... :thumbsup:...String 'er up......

Make sure your gas cap is snapped shut..... :grin:

 

Nahhh, you should leave the gas cap open so that a vacuum is not created, thereby preventing the FD fluid to properly drain.

 

JUST KIDDING!!!!!!!!!

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bimmers

Boy am I well informed now and just more confused at an ever higher level.

Just got bike back from service 12k with 80/90 in tranny and 75/140 in FD.

I am leaving it at that and we'll see how it lasts. I will have dealer fess up to me if it destroys the FD.

Thoe who put in 75/250 I think have asked for trouble and these are not car differentials, totally different forces at work.

 

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11101110

This might help for filling the tranny and FD.

 

tip

 

pictorial

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JayW
This might help for filling the tranny and FD.

 

tip

 

pictorial

 

That tip should work to fill the FD just fine, though I use a syringe with very good results and no spills.

 

Jay

 

 

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roughdiamond

I just booked my 2005 ST into the local BMW dealer here in Bristol. They put in the BMW recommended oil (75/90 at £33 a litre) and charged £63 all up. Can't really complain?

 

 

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marcopolo
Boy am I well informed now and just more confused at an ever higher level.

Just got bike back from service 12k with 80/90 in tranny and 75/140 in FD.

I am leaving it at that and we'll see how it lasts. I will have dealer fess up to me if it destroys the FD.

 

1) Did they write 75W140 clearly on the work order/invoice as for the FD?

2) have you asked them why they put in 75W140, when BMW specifies 75W90?

 

Some people have argued on this board, and others, that it doesn't matter what you put in. I, however, cannot understand why anyone (including a dealer) would use lubricants other than the ones specified by the people who made the bike. But that's just me.

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JayW
...cannot understand why anyone (including a dealer) would use lubricants other than the ones specified by the people who made the bike. But that's just me.

 

When I discussed this with my dealer (Bloodworth BMW who has a well-respected service department), one of the techs volunteered that he had just gotten back from a service training session, and he was sure that the 75W-140 is what BMW recommends for both the trans and FD. I asked if he could show me something in writing to this effect, but he seemed anxious to get back to work so I didn't press the issue. That dealer does not even stock the 75W-90 lubricant. I had to order it online.

 

It probably does not really matter, but I am sticking with the latest printed recommendations I can find just in case it does matter.

 

Jay

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Unhofliche_Gesundheit

re: "(75/90 at £33 a litre"

that is shockingly expensive. :eek:

 

 

re: This might help for filling the tranny and FD. <>

nice - the dude in the picture is wearing his rolex (!) while he works under his car... :dopeslap:

 

 

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