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Video of Bad Technique


russell_bynum

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It seems David and I had a similar experience at the track this weekend, only his ended with him changing his underwear and mine ended with me replacing my helmet. dopeslap.gif

 

Lisa and I spent the weekend at Buttonwillow Raceway in the central California Valley. It was our first time there and we had a ball. Lisa rode Saturday and I rode Sunday. We'll do a regular ride tale on that later. smile.gif

 

I was learning the track and REALLY having fun with it. There's a few really tricky sections where if you blow one corner, your whole lap is toast, and there's some fun little rises that make the bike do big power wheelies when you run over them at wide open throttle. smile.gif There aren't any long straights in the configuration that we were doing, and there is only one really fast corner ("Riverside") which is nice because I don't get any joy on the long straights and the fast corners scare the crap out of me. eek.gif

 

I spent the first session picking up Reference points. The second session I started to wick it up a little, and I got passed by a guy on a Gixxer (ahead of me here in this picture)

 

gixxerboy.jpg

 

I like following riders who are a bit faster than me because it pushes me to be really precise in order to stay with them. It also helps me learn because I can figure out if there's a particualar section of track that they're doing differently that's making them faster.

 

Anyway, I got passed by the same guy in the 3rd session, and immediately started following him. He was way faster through the middle section of the course including the "Bus Stop" corner. I picked out a few more RP's through that section that let me be comfortable getting on the gas more there, and was able to stay right with him. He pulled me at Riverside, but I'm OK with that since (as I mentioned) those fast corners give me the willies and I'm perfectly happy to lose ground on people there. smile.gif We got split by some traffic and I wound up about 100 yards behind, but I was slowly chipping away at his lead, mostly by being quicker out of "sweeper", a 180-degree right turn that tightens slightly at the exit (That's it in the picture above.), and by being faster through the "esses" leading up to Sunset corner before the front straight. I had just about caught him as I came through Sweeper in the closing minutes of the session when I had an event similar to what happened to David.

 

The rear tire spun and the bike stepped out to the left. Then it re-gripped and the resulting sudden return to center tucked the front and threw me into the air a bit. The front then regained traction and the bike was basically done with the event. But I wasn't. eek.gif I came back down way off center and basically fell off the right side of the bike. I briefly tried to steer it back under me, but it was a lost cause. When my right shoulder hit the track I started to tumble. I did the sky/ground/sky/ground routine a few times, then came to a stop in a big cloud of dust in the dirt.

 

Taking quick inventory, everything seemed OK. My first goal was to get out of the impact zone, so I stood up, waved at the corner worker to let them know I'm OK, and turned to see where the bike was. It was WAAAAAAAY off across the dirt towards "Lost Hill", on it's side. I couldn't figure out how it got there because there weren't any big slide marks in the dirt leading up to it. When I got to it, I picked it up, and it seemed OK...no scrapes on any of the sliders or anything. My guess is that once it was free of its tormentor, it decided to prove Keith Code's point that bikes do just fine when riders aren't on top of them screwing them up...and it just rolled off into the dirt on it's own. lmao.gif It eventually ran out of steam and just...well...fell over.

 

Damage to the bike is nill. There's a few new cracks in the fairing, but that fairing had already been crashed multiple times when I bought it, so that's no biggie. I'm fine...a bit sore today, but nothing major. My Scorpion helmet took a beating and will be replaced. The right shoulder in my Frank Thomas jacket ripped and it will be replaced. Other than that, everything's fine and we should be as good as new in two weekends for our track days at Reno. thumbsup.gif

 

As luck (?) would have it, Lisa was standing trackside with the video camera when this happened. (And no...I wasn't showing off for the camera.) As soon as I hit the ground, she forgot about the camera (can't say I blame her), so we don't get to see me doing my impression of Nadia Comaneci or the bike flipping me the bird as it rode off happily into the sunset without me, but we do get to see the actual event.

 

here's the video.

 

Here's a few interesting screen caps.

 

Here's max lean angle as I hook the bike in to set up for the Esses. Note the font and back wheels are in line.

max_lean.jpg

 

 

Here's max slide angle. Note the angle of the front compared to the rear. If I actually knew what I was doing, this would be really cool. tongue.gif

slide_starts.jpg

 

 

Here's where it suddenly snapps back in and you can see the front forks compress from all the force. You can also see that I've started my trip skyward.

snap_back.jpg

 

Here's the front tire losing traction and tucking.

front_tucks.jpg

 

Then it regains grip and the bike is basically done with the event and ready to resume it's lap. But I have other ideas...here's me coming down not-quite on the bike.

unhappy_landing.jpg

 

Here's me realizing that things are not going according to plan. lmao.gif

not_going_well.jpg

 

And here's the CBR finally freed from its tormentor and ready to resume a happy and normal life.

free_at_last.jpg

 

From what I can tell, I made two key mistakes.

 

First, I think I got ahead of myself. I opened the throttle at max lean, probably because that's the point where I'm looking up at open track ahead of me. dopeslap.gif I need to wait until about a half second later when I stand the bike up before I open the throttle that much.

 

Second, I don't believe that I was properly anchored on the bike. You're supposed to be locked in using your feet and outside knee. I have a feeling I wasn't anchored well against the tank with my outside knee and if I had been, I would have stayed with the bike.

 

While I'd obviously rather not end a day by crashing, this one was relatively painless since it didn't result in any damage to me, it didn't damage the bike, and there are lessons that I can learn and take with me to the next track day.

 

I do plan on Contact Cementing myself to the saddle next time, though. lmao.gif

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The two of you just need to stop it with these "moments of clarity" already!!!!

 

It appears that at the point where things really got away form you, the track transitions form positive to flat to negative camber?

 

A combination of loading the suspension from cornering forces, then accelerating, then a change in track camber all came together at that moment to over extend your available traction.

 

It almost looks as though you had a slightly early turn in that put you wider on exit as well?

 

Hard to tell and I only put these thoughts out there as I really like to dig into these events as there is SO much to be learned from breaking it down.

 

As I have not done Code, how does your body positioning look as you come into the "event" sequence compared to his teaching? Enough attack position and body to the inside for lower CG?

 

Bottom line, you are OK!!! A helmet and a few stitches = couple hundred dollars. The film for harrassment = priceless grin.gifgrin.gif!

 

I just have to think that it is time to look into a few suspension adjustments as well! Although the chase was on and there were "operator" control possibilities in all this, yours and David's lap times are tumbling which will necessitate some additional preload and possible damping adjustments. Just another out loud thought into causes.

 

I am a believer that the rider is always the in-control, responsible party but other factors can sometimes prevent the rider from exerting control in an otherwise controllable arena.

 

What think you? confused.gif

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It appears that at the point where things really got away form you, the track transitions form positive to flat to negative camber?

 

I don't think so. I could be mistaken, but I think the track is pretty flat at that point.

 

It almost looks as though you had a slightly early turn in that put you wider on exit as well?

 

I don't think so. I remember feeling like I was in pretty good shape coming out of Sweeper. You have to line up just right to get an almost-straight shot through the esses and I was in good shape for that, so I think my exit line was fine.

 

Hard to tell and I only put these thoughts out there as I really like to dig into these events as there is SO much to be learned from breaking it down.

 

I totally agree.

 

As I have not done Code, how does your body positioning look as you come into the "event" sequence compared to his teaching? Enough attack position and body to the inside for lower CG?

 

Good question. I could have my upper body down a bit more, but otherwise, I think body position is not bad.

 

 

Bottom line, you are OK!!! A helmet and a few stitches = couple hundred dollars. The film for harrassment = priceless grin.gifgrin.gif!

 

lmao.giflmao.gif

 

I just have to think that it is time to look into a few suspension adjustments as well! Although the chase was on and there were "operator" control possibilities in all this, yours and David's lap times are tumbling which will necessitate some additional preload and possible damping adjustments. Just another out loud thought into causes.

 

I am a believer that the rider is always the in-control, responsible party but other factors can sometimes prevent the rider from exerting control in an otherwise controllable arena.

 

What think you? confused.gif

 

For sure. I have a Penske rear shock that I just put on the bike for this track day. I worked with a suspension tuner all morning and we got the rear shock dialed in really well. The front forks are still stock...with the original oil, way too soft springs, and weak valving. We'd get the forks marginal, but after a few laps, the oil would heat up and the damping would go away. I had a few real interesting moments when I bottomed the forks under hard braking and slid the front wheel a bit. eek.gif Springs and valves are definitely in order for the bike, and that'll happen as soon as funds allow. In the meantime, I'll cool it a bit.

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Russell,

 

Glad you are OK. Shoulder didn't re-dislocate? Even better!

Does this qualify as "Bounce...bounce...bounce"?

That second photo from the bottom where you are full sideways to the bike would make a great avatar! Just think of the stories you could tell...

 

Looking forward to seeing you at your Reno track days!

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You are a brave man for posting that one grin.gif

 

It is amazing how quickly things can go wrong. It's equally amazing how quickly the bike corrected itself and kept on rolling. As you said, too bad the leg wasn't locked in as it could have easily just been a minor OS moment.

 

I always think about how our height impacts our ability to really get in the proper position on these little bikes. When I get down on the tank, I feel like so much of my upper body is out beyond the bars and not balanced. Did you feel like the rear hooking up is what kicked you off, or was it the front end tuck? Hard to tell.

 

Glad it was minor.

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Did you feel like the rear hooking up is what kicked you off, or was it the front

 

I believe that the rear hooking up and snapping back in threw me up, and the front tuck threw me forwards. Either one by themself wouldn't have been a problem, but both together was bad news.

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Sorry I put the camera down everyone!! I'm not really sure why I did, as there wasn't anything I could do for Russell anyway, as it was a hot track (If it was the street, I could have gone over there and helped, but I'm not running across the track with 40 bikes coming at me at tremendous speed - not safe for them, not safe for me!). But, until I knew he was alright, I wasn't really concentrating on filming anymore! When he stood up and waved to the corner worker, I thought "oh, I should probably be filming", and resumed, but by that time, the bike had landed. I couldn't see how it arrived so far away, there was such a dust cloud from it and Russell hitting the field, but it was FAR away, and no scratches on it, so it had to have ridden itself over there. It looked like such an easy fall (for Russell), I figured he was probably fine if he didn't dislocate his shoulder.

 

Now that I look at the video, it is actually pretty lmao.gif

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Now that I look at the video, it is actually pretty lmao.gif

 

Like Mark says...it's all funny until someone gets hurt. Then it's hilarious.

 

thumbsup.gif

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Hi Russell,

 

A coupe of things happened that aggravated the situation. As you are rolling on the throttle it appears that lean angle was being added. At the same time, I'd speculate you were a bit tight on the bars, that is speculation but due to the fact the bike wasn't that far out of track and the apparency of adding lean, which you would have had to do with the bars putting them under some tension, I'd bet on it. Past that the bike throwing you forward either created an abrupt roll off or you did it as the bike came around in the rear, hard to tell on that, you'd be the best judge.

 

Keith

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A coupe of things happened that aggravated the situation. As you are rolling on the throttle it appears that lean angle was being added.

 

Definitely. The exit of Sweeper tightens slightly as you go into the Esses, so you do tighten up the turn a bit there. I'm not sure if you can see it on the video that I posted (I had to reduce it a bit to be more bandwidth-friendly.) but you can see my upper body coming down and in as I Hook the bike in.

 

At the same time, I'd speculate you were a bit tight on the bars, that is speculation but due to the fact the bike wasn't that far out of track and the apparency of adding lean, which you would have had to do with the bars putting them under some tension, I'd bet on it.

 

That's probably a safe bet. I probably did give it some countersteering in addition to the body position change. I think I'm generally pretty good about staying loose on the bars, but if the slide happened as I'm actually applying pressure, then it would certainly tend to transmit any instability to my upper body, making the situation worse.

 

Past that the bike throwing you forward either created an abrupt roll off or you did it as the bike came around in the rear, hard to tell on that, you'd be the best judge.

 

I don't recall consciously closing the throttle, and I've been pretty good about staying on it when the rear spins in the past, so I think I did OK there. But, getting thrown up would certainly cause a roll-off...which throws the weight forward and would explain the front end tuck.

 

The root of the problem was definitely adding power at maximimum lean angle. Visually, the track opens up there and you can see all the way up through the esses, so I'm betting that I just got ahead of myself and opened the throttle a bit early when I could see up the track.

 

You're definitely right that a stiff upper body would compound the problem, as would a sudden roll-off caused by being tossed into the air.

 

I guess I need more time on the slide bike, huh? grin.gif

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Got any video of Lisa, from Saturday, not bouncing? Seriously, very happy you aren't hurt Russell. Nice that you've trained this bike to head for dirt. thumbsup.gif

 

Wowee, insight from Keith on the board? Wowee! wave.gif

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Got any video of Lisa, from Saturday, not bouncing?

 

Lisa was kicking butt on Saturday and I did get a bit of video and pictures, which we'll post shortly. The Bridgestones on her FZR look like they've been to hell and back...three times.

 

Wowee, insight from Keith on the board? Wowee! wave.gif

 

Nothing but the best for our members! cool.gif

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My video through there is not nearly as interesting, Kathy!! (which I guess is a good thing...) To me, most people look slower on camera, thus I look like I'm going backwards! (which tells you how fast the racers are going, as they still look fast on camera!).

 

We do have some pretty good still pix of me though. There's one I need to post to see what you guys think...knee down, or no? I didn't feel it touch (and Russell thinks I would have felt it), but you can not see air between my knee and the ground! So if I didn't touch, I was THIS close! cool.gif (Yes, I could look to see if the pucks were scraped, but I am using a set of Russell's old pucks, so they came pre-scraped smirk.gif ) Plus, there's some shots of me displaying pretty decent body position, draped over the tank, very low (since the FZR's pegs are so low, I am forced into good body position or I scrape the hell out the pegs and scare myself (I don't want to fall off too!). This is good and bad. Sometimes, I go slower through a corner than I think I could as I am afraid I'll scrape, therefore, slowing me down. However, I absolutely can't get lazy on body position, so it's helping me there.

 

Sorry, back to the video. blush.gif

 

Keith, nice to have your analysis. I am usually too tight on the bars, so this gives me an incentive to loosen up! I think when I hang off the bike, my feet and arms do most of the work (in ensuring I don't come all the way off the bike), instead of my thigh. I'll have to work on that (plus, I know I use my arms to help me slide off, as the bike shimmies a bit when I move, instead of a nice smooth motion...I need to do level 3 again!). And I have a death grip on the bars too, as my hands hurt BAD at the end of the day. By the end of the last session when we put our hand up to signify we're coming off the track, I could hardly unbend my fingers, and I didn't want to put my hand back down! crazy.gif

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Well if you want to be a movie stuntman, you already live in CA.

Like Mark says...it's all funny until someone gets hurt. Then it's hilarious.
This is priceless.

not_going_well.jpg

 

My biggest psycological discomfort on the ZX-6R is I feel 20-25% of my bodyweight is forward of the bars, and you have a couple of inches on me and Mark has seven. Makes it awful hard to recover from bad things, I think.

 

I slid the RT rear turning right over a hill on Sunday. It must be the gravitational pull of the full moon. Glad you're OK.

 

-RickP.

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Well, I think that "loose on the bars" thing has some significant merit.

 

And the standing offer for you to borrow my like is no longer on the table. tongue.gif

 

Normally it takes a couple years before you can laugh at something like this, but it's only taking me a couple of hours. grin.gif

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Well, I think that "loose on the bars" thing has some significant merit.

 

Do you suppose that I was tight on the bars in general, or just because of the countersteering pressure? I hope it is just the former, but the latter is certainly a possibility. I do try hard to stay loose up top, but that doesn't mean I was actually able to do it. thumbsup.gif

 

Normally it takes a couple years before you can laugh at something like this, but it's only taking me a couple of hours.

 

Don't sweat it...I was laughing at it watching it on the camera under the EZ-Up in the pits while still holding my banged-up helmet 8 minutes after it happened. grin.gif

 

The bike is fine, btw. I stripped all the bodywork last night and everything is fine. It just rolled off across the dirt, came to a stop, and fell over.

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Man, this has been a tough year on your hardware. frown.gif I'm glad the tormentor and the tormented are not much worse for the wear this time, and it became a learning opportunity.

 

These physics experiments for tall guys on short wheelbase bikes shed a little light on why the MotoGP riders tend to have a different body type and size, eh? wink.gif That's making me think a little differently about a track day in my future. I'd still like to do it, but when I look at those little bikes .... eek.gifgrin.gif

 

All things considered, I'm not willing to trade being able to flatfoot my GS even on its centerstand. thumbsup.gif

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Well, I think that "loose on the bars" thing has some significant merit.

 

Do you suppose that I was tight on the bars in general, or just because of the countersteering pressure?

 

I'm thinking in general. I don't think there's significantly more pressure during countersteering.

 

Normally it takes a couple years before you can laugh at something like this, but it's only taking me a couple of hours.

 

It just rolled off across the dirt, came to a stop, and fell over.

 

My guess is that your bike, even knowing it was going to crash, enjoyed that 30 yard ride without you more than any other recent ride. It could finally relax, having dumped your sorry ass on the pavement so that it could run free like it was meant to. tongue.gif

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I'm thinking in general. I don't think there's significantly more pressure during countersteering.

 

Hmm.

 

I'll pay close attention to that when we're at Fernley next weekend. I think I'm OK with that skill, but I'll double-check.

 

My guess is that your bike, even knowing it was going to crash, enjoyed that 30 yard ride without you more than any other recent ride. It could finally relax, having dumped your sorry ass on the pavement so that it could run free like it was meant to.

 

No doubt. I think it was getting me back for the rattle-can paint job over the already busted-up bodywork. tongue.gif

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Hi Russell,

 

A coupe of things happened that aggravated the situation. As you are rolling on the throttle it appears that lean angle was being added. At the same time, I'd speculate you were a bit tight on the bars, that is speculation but due to the fact the bike wasn't that far out of track and the apparency of adding lean, which you would have had to do with the bars putting them under some tension, I'd bet on it. Past that the bike throwing you forward either created an abrupt roll off or you did it as the bike came around in the rear, hard to tell on that, you'd be the best judge.

 

Keith

 

Oh sure....like he really needs advice from a n00b. eek.gifeek.gif

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These physics experiments for tall guys on short wheelbase bikes shed a little light on why the MotoGP riders tend to have a different body type and size, eh? That's making me think a little differently about a track day in my future. I'd still like to do it, but when I look at those little bikes ....

 

Nah, don't worry about it. While most of the top racers are fairly short, there are exceptions. Schwantz is all knees and elbows and he did OK. smile.gif I'm fairly comfortable on the bike, I just asked it to do something I shouldn't have asked it to do, then I got in the way of it doing it...and it said "You are the weakest link...Goodbye." and pitched me off.

 

You'll do fine.

 

Just do yourself a favor and start with a track school, not a regular track day.

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Oh sure....like he really needs advice from a n00b. eek.gifeek.gif

 

LOL!!!

 

Yeah!! How much can a guy with only 4 posts actually know anyway?!

 

thumbsup.gif

 

Seriously Keith...thanks for the reply. I'll have to schedule some time with you guys next spring to come do Level 4 again and spend some time scaring the bejezzus out of myself on the slide bike until I figure this out. I've been having small slides here and there and dealing with them fine, but this one jumped up and bit me in the ass.

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Oh sure....like he really needs advice from a n00b. eek.gifeek.gif

 

LOL!!!

 

Yeah!! How much can a guy with only 4 posts actually know anyway?!

 

thumbsup.gif

 

Seriously Keith...thanks for the reply. I'll have to schedule some time with you guys next spring to come do Level 4 again and spend some time scaring the bejezzus out of myself on the slide bike until I figure this out. I've been having small slides here and there and dealing with them fine, but this one jumped up and bit me in the ass.

Keith,

Please spend a lot of time with Russell.... He's scaring the bejezzus out of all of us! eek.gifeek.gifeek.gif

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A coupe of things happened that aggravated the situation. As you are rolling on the throttle it appears that lean angle was being added.

 

 

Hey Russell , glad you are ok. I have only done about 4 days at buttonwillow but I really came to enjoy it alot. The sweeper is an interesting turn in that there are several usable lines thru it and ways to attack it. it took me awhile to figure out but you can turn it into kind of a double apex and turn in really late at the end. This sets you up to drive really hard thru the esses and lessens the effect of the decreasing radius It also allows yu to trailbrake thru the stat of the turn for longer. I saew a top level afm guy run right off the track there his first time around so it can catch anyone out. get together for reno man. Looking forward to seing you. I have thunderhill this wekend to prepare. mwahahahahahahahahah. I am goint to put on a brembo master cylinder and superbike lines on the gsxr as I have been having problems wit fade. also going to install different gearing so that sgoing to take some getting used to. the gearing on the gsxr is ridiculous. over 100 mph in 1st so I am going to the recommended track/ race ratio's of one down and two up in the rear 16/45 I think.. Do you run standard 600rr gearing ?

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Hey Tim!

 

Yeah, I was playing with a few different lines through sweeper, including the double apex where you really square off the last bit. That's probably the quickest way around since it lets you carry lots of speed in through the first half, then trail brake to the second apex, square it off, get the bike upright, and zip out through the esses.

 

The stock front end of the CBR is holding me back as far as braking goes, so I haven't seen any problems with fade yet. It does have superbike lines on it though, so maybe it wouldn't be an issue anyway.

 

I'm running -1/+2 gearing. I believe that's 15/45, if memory serves. It seems to work well for me, but I'm not really at a level where that sort of thing makes a big measurable difference in my laptimes.

 

Deffinitely looking forward to Reno!

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Sounds like you had an exciting weekend! Glad you came out of it in one piece and able to laugh about it now. Bet your sore tonight though.

unhappy_landing.jpg

Looking at this picture is just weird. For some reason it reminds me of the time our son got off the bike, turned and walked away without putting the side stand down while I watched the bike fall. How can that happen? Looks like you just stepped off the bike and it kept on going. I can not figure out how you kept from bringing it down on top of you after you landed back on the bike off center. Is there some point where you consciously let go?

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Is there some point where you consciously let go?

 

Yes. I briefly tried to steer it back under me (I've come off the SeaDoos at speed in a similar way before and sometimes you can basically steer it back under you and save it.) and when that didn't work I just let go. You'll noticed that the next picture in the series, I'm still holding on with both hands, but a split second later, I decided to declare victory and move on to greater challenges. smile.gif

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Russell,

Like everyone else I'm glad it was a relatively easy get off for you. Thanks for the pics and video. You've got guts buddy.

 

Evil "G" says, "Do we change your name to dribble. eek.gif Err you know repeat bouncing." grin.gif

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Evil "G" says, "Do we change your name to dribble. eek.gif Err you know repeat bouncing." grin.gif

Yeah, seriously! He's not even Double Bounce anymore! Wassup widdat?! Friggin' mods. grin.gif

Nah, Russell, it's obvious: You were checking to see if the pretty blue tape was still on the headlight!

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Evil "G" says, "Do we change your name to dribble. eek.gif Err you know repeat bouncing." grin.gif

Yeah, seriously! He's not even Double Bounce anymore! Wassup widdat?! Friggin' mods. grin.gif

Nah, Russell, it's obvious: You were checking to see if the pretty blue tape was still on the headlight!

 

Crashes at the track are like crashes in the dirt....they don't count. thumbsup.gif

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Evil "G" says, "Do we change your name to dribble. eek.gif Err you know repeat bouncing." grin.gif

Yeah, seriously! He's not even Double Bounce anymore! Wassup widdat?! Friggin' mods. grin.gif

Nah, Russell, it's obvious: You were checking to see if the pretty blue tape was still on the headlight!

 

Crashes at the track are like crashes in the dirt....they don't count. thumbsup.gif

 

Tell that to Lisa!!!!! eek.gif

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I don't have much to add beyond it's good that you didn't exacerbate your preexisting shoulder problem.

 

And that the video, certainly at full-speed, native size and without reading the narrative, makes it look like you simply fell off when things got a little rough. And that's good for a laugh.

 

Lisa's right. It's a really nicely shot video right up until the camera seeks out her feet.

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It's a really nicely shot video right up until the camera seeks out her feet.

True, and such a smooth dismount. 9.4 from the Slovac judge. thumbsup.gif

Seriously, while your recount very much portrays the violence that occured in a very short period of time, it amazes me how almost...fluid and smooth it all looks. Yikes.

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And that the video, certainly at full-speed, native size and without reading the narrative, makes it look like you simply fell off when things got a little rough. And that's good for a laugh.

 

I know! I'm out there for a few minutes sitting on the bike in the middle of this dirt field waiting for the session to end so I can ride it back to the pits and all I can think is "I just fell off the damn bike."

 

While I wish it had not happened, I'm glad that we got it on video so that: a) I can learn from it and b) So that we can laugh at it. smile.gif

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I gotta chime in with a complement here, as we cackle over your crashes. smirk.gif

 

Russell - you are one steely cool Borg-like SOB. More to the point, your analytical disposition has you dissecting how to do it better next time while you are dusting yourself off from the last one - and that's pretty cool. I think of all the posts where riders have a get off one way or another and have demons in their noggins for a while, or worse, hang up the sport for good. It's understandable. You, however, seem unfazed by it all.

 

Thanks for posting, and may we all continue to live vicariously through your mis-adventures. You are Corbin Bernson, leaning into the pitch for the team, and we appreciate it. thumbsup.gif

 

Now, take it easy next time, and take your base.

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Thanks Jake.

 

I really enjoy the learning aspect of track riding and I'm glad we got this one on video. Even though it's somewhat embarassing since I basically just fell off the damn bike, I'm happy to share the video with everyone to get their feedback. I'm particularly grateful for David and Keith's oberservations about me being tight on the bars.

 

I feel like I'm pretty OK with that. My bike doesn't wobble when I move around in the saddle, and my arms/hands aren't tired/sore after a day at the track. But...what they say makes perfect sense and might explain what happened. A slide like I had should have just been a minor little event, but instead it tossed me off the bike. I'm going to really focus on staying loose when we're at Reno weekend after next and see what I find.

 

As for laughing about it, my motto is: If you can't laugh at yourself, at least let other people laugh at you. grin.gif

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The root of the problem was definitely adding power at maximimum lean angle. Visually, the track opens up there and you can see all the way up through the esses, so I'm betting that I just got ahead of myself and opened the throttle a bit early when I could see up the track.

 

Bounce,

 

Tons of great hindsight here. I'll share my mine with the rest.

 

I think the "start" of your problem (there were obviously a few things you did to make it worse) was that you were too low in the rev range through the corner. Here's why I say that. I know you are a bit tentative in the sweepers, so it probably helps mentally if you're down on the torque curve through the corner. The problem comes on exit when you go for throttle - probably not upright yet - and then hit the powerband at the same time. You can almost hear it in the video.

 

If you keep the bike in the powerband throughout the corner, your power application on exit becomes much more linear and although you have more of it, it's also more predicatable and less abrupt.

 

For what it's worth...

 

Great Vid!

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I think the "start" of your problem (there were obviously a few things you did to make it worse) was that you were too low in the rev range through the corner. Here's why I say that. I know you are a bit tentative in the sweepers, so it probably helps mentally if you're down on the torque curve through the corner. The problem comes on exit when you go for throttle - probably not upright yet - and then hit the powerband at the same time. You can almost hear it in the video.

 

Voodoo makes a good point. If I could piggyback on that, just picking the bike up will add 400-600 RPM because of the difference in tire circumference of the rear tire. That'll magnify the effect as you come into the power band.

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[quoteVoodoo makes a good point. If I could piggyback on that, just picking the bike up will add 400-600 RPM because of the difference in tire circumference of the rear tire. That'll magnify the effect as you come into the power band. [/quote

 

I am not sure that picking the bike up onto the fat part of the tire would tend to exacerbat the tendency to slide though. Thats exactly what i am striving to do more of on the big bike. Pick that sucker up and launch it to the next corner

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Evil "G" says, "Do we change your name to dribble. eek.gif Err you know repeat bouncing." grin.gif

Yeah, seriously! He's not even Double Bounce anymore! Wassup widdat?! Friggin' mods. grin.gif

Nah, Russell, it's obvious: You were checking to see if the pretty blue tape was still on the headlight!

 

Crashes at the track are like crashes in the dirt....they don't count. thumbsup.gif

 

Tell that to Lisa!!!!! eek.gif

 

 

.....And Teresa!! PLEASE hurry up and tell it to Teresa. If my "time out" from the track continues much longer.....

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