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Video of Good/Bad Technique in a Single Heartbeat


David

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Intro: We can all learn from each other, and this video (shot Saturday on the track) perfectly illustrates bad and good technique on my part.

 

Setting: It was a beautiful day, and this was my fourth session. We'd done three in the morning, when I ran a bunch of 1:48 and 1:49 laps. Then lunch, and this session. I remember thinking that I wasn't completely on my game and thought I'd better be careful. Apparently I need to listen to myself better.

 

Context: I was working on passing people. First I caught up to this guy in the red leathers. I was going to take him on the outside of the long Turn 2, but his lines didn't seem predictable, so I decided to take him on the outside of the hill just before the hairpin. If you listen carefully, you can hear the front tire squealing under heavy braking at the bottom of that hill before the hairpin (31 secs into the video). I pass him, no problem, and then see my prey: three other riders.

 

Before: I brake late into the roller coaster, hop the curb to save time, and catch up to them before that quick left/right transition. I can't safely pass the slowest rider there, so I figure I'll get a good drive out of the right hander and pass him on the outside.

 

Immediately Before: At that quick left around 1:00 into the video, you enter that with your knee on the ground in 4th, going 90 mph. As you exit the right hander, you're under nearly full power, with your right knee on the ground and just over 100 mph. Here's a still from the video, right at that moment:

 

53.jpg

 

Michelin says you can get 50.6 degrees of lean out of these tires in good conditions (which I had that day). My crude measurements indicate just under 53 degrees of lean.

 

Click here to see the 1 minute video (30+ MB), and you'll see the near highside right after the frame I've pulled out above. Click here to see a much smaller version of the same 1 minute video (2 MB).

 

Bad Technique: 1) Starts with poor competitive judgment in letting myself focus too much on passing without thinking about technique. 2) Continues with application of too much power for the lean angle. Never mind that these are street tires (Pilot Power) that I have no business running on at this pace, but it's my job to ride within the performance envelope and I did a stupid job of it.

 

Good Technique: Only easing off the throttle sufficiently for it to hook up again instead of chopping the throttle for a certain high side. You can see how quickly the rear comes around. And believe me, on the bike itself, it feels a lot more violent than it does in the video. My right foot came off the peg. In all honestly, though, my survival instincts initiated the quick drop of throttle. But a millisecond later my brain took over and kept the throttle in, albeit at about 80%. I left the audio track so you could hear the throttle position.

 

I learned a whole bunch yesterday. Rapid heart rate without pain is the best way to learn with as little consequence as possible. tongue.gif

 

(A few disclaimers. FIrst, sorry for the lousy video with the windshield through the front. It's my first try on this bike. And double sorry for the audio--I need to figure out a better place to put the microphone.)

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Good analysis!

 

It is always interesting to see the dramatic changes in vehicle dynamics that take place when the "correct" line for the track is not available and you have to pick one to get by someone.

 

One of the hardest things to do is to focus your attention on racing the track and not the other riders.

 

Good job to maintain your throttle control!!!! It is so very important, and difficult, to maintain throttle in the open position when this occurs.

 

A good way that helped me visualize what to do when those a#$ pucker moments occur was to stop accelerating. Do not decelerate, just maintain your momentum and go to a constant speed throttle setting

 

Thanks for the video! My heartbeat is up!!!!!!!!! thumbsup.gifgrin.gif

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It is always interesting to see the dramatic changes in vehicle dynamics that take place when the "correct" line for the track is not available and you have to pick one to get by someone.

 

That's a good point, and one I hadn't even thought of. Taking the attack angle of that outside line required more lean angle than a straight shot out of the apex. Duh. tongue.gif

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Nice job David! eek.gif

You are not alone.......a good friend of mine did the exact same thing on his Mille R. He should have known better as he was instructing a group of riders! In his case, he ended up high siding and fracturing his hip. In essence...he was too focused on the competition and not "his" race....the competition in his case was a couple of students eek.gif

Ah! The wisdom of age...when we truly discover that a birth certificate is merely a license to learn....every day in every way grin.gifthumbsup.gif

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Looks like you could have been on the track seam too. You mentioned something about them being a little greasy the last time we were there.

 

That's a great passing area especially given the fact that most people slow down waaay to much for turn 12.

There's a faily short amount of time between the time your RPMs start going up and when it breaks loose, so I'm guessing you really goosed it to try and get around them.

 

I'm sure the video minimizes how much you really stepped out, but I predict you will look back on this and say "I can't believe that used to freak me out." In MotoGP this weekend, it seemed like Caprirossi did something like that on one particular turn every frikin' lap when he was behind Rossi. Just another day at the office for them cool.gif.

 

Good save!

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I'm sure the video minimizes how much you really stepped out, but I predict you will look back on this and say "I can't believe that used to freak me out."

 

That's probably true, though it's a little tough to imagine from this vantage point. But there's nothing like experiencing it--I suppose that's why Code has the lean/slide bike, so that you can feel it and develop an instinct.

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Can I mention DOT race tires again David? I am going to try the bridgestone DOT's next. Everyone i know at the track is saying they are the shiznit and 100 bucks cheaper than /dunlop slicks. like around 290 for a set .or so.. hard to beat that

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Can I mention DOT race tires again David? I am going to try the bridgestone DOT's next. Everyone i know at the track is saying they are the shiznit and 100 bucks cheaper than /dunlop slicks. like around 290 for a set .or so.. hard to beat that

 

I haven't tried 'em, but I know that Jeff over at CBR600RR.com runs the Bridgestone DOT's on his '05 racebike and he seems to really like them.

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I've got a set of Power Race tires on their way. Here by Friday. Mounted on Saturday in the garage. On the track Sunday.

 

Can't wait to see about the difference.

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Glad to read you two came through this OK. Do you think that a "piece" of this might be the powers getting a bit overstressed and so too hot and letting go more quickly than usual?

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Do you think that a "piece" of this might be the powers getting a bit overstressed and so too hot and letting go more quickly than usual?

 

That's quite possible. I've collected tons of data on the tires that day, but haven't analyzed it via spreadsheet. Right after this I did take the surface temperatur on that side, and it was 165 degrees. Now I need to find out what that means for a street tire. For a race tire, that's not at all high.

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Maybe Michelin would know at what exact temp the Power's grip begins to become somewhat compromised. You guys may or may not be at the riding point where race tires are a better fit.

 

Let us know what you find, and especially what you think of the Pilot Race at the track in comparison.

 

As a street tire, I've got the powers on the Baby SV and like them a lot so far, though not enough time on them to really decide between them and Metz M-3s.

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1) thanks for posting that

2) That Tuono SOUNDS NICE!

3) Awesome control of the "choppin' the throttle" SR...

4) I'd have been flying through the air with the greatest of ease...

5) I have VOLUMES to learn but will be doing Code for sure next year at some point and I can't wait.

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Maybe Michelin would know at what exact temp the Power's grip begins to become somewhat compromised. You guys may or may not be at the riding point where race tires are a better fit.

 

I"m pretty sure we're at the place where it make sense to switch, and I suspect we should have a ago. On the one hand, I've seen some amazing riding on street tires. But what's the point? That's not their intended purpose. RIght now I'm 12 seconds off the pace of the slow guys in AMA Supersport. Still stupid slow, but there doesn't seem much point in trying further on street tires.

 

So Power Race tires (hardest of the three compounds) go on Saturday morning, and we'll see if there's any difference on Sunday. If if there's not a wider technical envelope that's useable, it'll help my confidence.

 

As a street tire, I've got the powers on the Baby SV and like them a lot so far, though not enough time on them to really decide between them and Metz M-3s.

 

Just to be clear about it, I still think they are a remarkable tire. And when I want to do street riding, it'll be on the Pilot Power.

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5) I have VOLUMES to learn but will be doing Code for sure next year at some point and I can't wait.

 

That's great to hear! I'm sure you'll enjoy it. Near you, they'll be at VIR or Barber. Both are really fun tracks. Barber is in much better condition, but VIR is one of my favorites.

 

Looking forward to hearing of your experience! smile.gif

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Just to be clear about it, I still think they are a remarkable tire. And when I want to do street riding, it'll be on the Pilot Power.

 

Same here. You have to push the thing pretty hard to get it to slide. It comes up to temp REALLY quickly, and it is generally very forgiving. They last a long time, too (For a sticky tire like that.)

 

Depending on David's review of the Power Race, I may switch to DOT's as well. If I do, this set of Pilot Powers (which are basically new) will go in the garage and will go on the Tuono the next time it needs tires.

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