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fusebox: hole in the bottom


NoHeat

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The fusebox in my 1150RT has a hole in its bottom, and I'm wondering whether it's supposed to be there, or if it's the remnant of a wiring modification by the previous owner.

 

The hole is about 5 mm diameter, and it's in the bottom surface of the box, very near the corner of the box that is closest to the throttle. I can see light through it from above, when I have the fusebox lid off.

 

Is that hole supposed to be there?

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I would suppose it's a drain hole to let any water that might get in there escape.

 

Or let any loose electrons out, wouldn't want them just sitting there waiting to shock you!!!!

 

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

 

Stan

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I would suppose it's a drain hole to let any water that might get in there escape.

 

Or let any loose electrons out, wouldn't want them just sitting there waiting to shock you!!!!

 

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

 

Stan

 

Bryant may be right and Stan makes a valid point but may I suggest:

 

1. reducing the weight?

2. creating a small resonance chamber to enhance the sound of the engine?

wink.gif

 

Any other suggestions?

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I would suppose it's a drain hole to let any water that might get in there escape.

 

Or let any loose electrons out, wouldn't want them just sitting there waiting to shock you!!!!

 

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

 

Stan

 

Bryant may be right and Stan makes a valid point but may I suggest:

 

1. reducing the weight?

2. creating a small resonance chamber to enhance the sound of the engine?

wink.gif

 

Any other suggestions?

 

Another important thought, it might help when a fuse blows, after all it has to BLOW somewhere. lmao.giflmao.gif

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You have to keep the hole clean though. If the excess electrons don't run out evenly, it can cause surging.

 

wink.gif

 

In addition, if you don't keep the hole clean, the electrons can find it difficult to exit which is the precursor to an Electron Escape Hole failure, and let me tell you, those are expensive as the entire Electron Final Drive System is quite pricey. tongue.giftongue.gif

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Okay, you clowns. You've more than answered my question.

 

Now tell me this: what kind of oil is best for the hole? Synthetic or dino?

 

WELLLLLLLL, WHAT kind of fuses are you using? Synthetic I hope as they are far superior to the organic ones. clap.gif

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I just wrap the blown ones with the wrapper off chewing gum. BMW riders are always spending money they don't have to.

 

And do you use the chewing gum to plug the Electron Vapor Evecuation Hole in the bottom of the fuse box? If so, you are certainly treading on thin ice. tongue.giftongue.gif

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You need to identify the hole more precisely, if it is 5mm, it is factory installed, if it is 5/32, it is after market. I'm sorry to bring you bad news, but, it may void your warranty. lmao.gif

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My '04 has a hole too. I would suppose it's a drain hole to let any water that might get in there escape.

That is exactly what it is there for. Rubber seals will stop liquid water from entering, but rubber and all plastics, are permeable to water VAPOR. Eventually, enough water vapor will diffuse inside, and then condense when it gets cooler, resulting in liquid water inside.

 

The hole does 2 things: 1) It allows any condensate to run out, and 2) it allows air to breath in and out (as temperature changes, and the air inside expands and contracts), keeping the humidity inside from building up over time, as it would if it were totally sealed.

 

BMW ran into this problem with the K100 instrument cluster. It was totally sealed, and ended up with condensation inside over time. They had to redesign it to add a couple of Gore-Tex breathers that allowed air to breath in and out, but blocked liquid water form entering. They used Gore-Tex sealed breathers, because the instruments are in a much more exposed place than the fuse boxes, and were exposed to direct rain.

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That is exactly what it is there for. Rubber seals will stop liquid water from entering, but rubber and all plastics, are permeable to water VAPOR. Eventually, enough water vapor will diffuse inside, and then condense when it gets cooler, resulting in liquid water inside.

 

The hole does 2 things: 1) It allows any condensate to run out, and 2) it allows air to breath in and out (as temperature changes, and the air inside expands and contracts), keeping the humidity inside from building up over time, as it would if it were totally sealed.

 

BMW ran into this problem with the K100 instrument cluster. It was totally sealed, and ended up with condensation inside over time. They had to redesign it to add a couple of Gore-Tex breathers that allowed air to breath in and out, but blocked liquid water form entering. They used Gore-Tex sealed breathers, because the instruments are in a much more exposed place than the fuse boxes, and were exposed to direct rain.

Oh there you go Bob. Some of us are trying to give the guy a serious answer to his question, and you go and be all smart-alecky about it. wink.gif
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Oh there you go Bob. Some of us are trying to give the guy a serious answer to his question, and you go and be all smart-alecky about it. wink.gif

It's the engineer in me that made me do it! grin.gif

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Bob, I'm curious about GS's. I've seen lots of photos on advrider of GS boxers fording rivers. You'd think the hole would let in water, and everything would short.

 

The hole is in a line-of-sight with the rear tire, anyway, so you'd think that water would enter the fusebox from rear-wheel fling, even in shallower water.

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Bob, I'm curious about GS's. I've seen lots of photos on advrider of GS boxers fording rivers. You'd think the hole would let in water, and everything would short.

 

The hole is in a line-of-sight with the rear tire, anyway, so you'd think that water would enter the fusebox from rear-wheel fling, even in shallower water.

 

I believe what saves the day is that the rest of the relay box is sealed tight. Water cannot easily get in a small hole, if no internal air can get out to make room for the water.

 

I cannot vouch for the GS, but on a K1200RS I just finished putting together, the hole was at the end of a longish conical projection that stuck downward (almost like a small spout sticking straight down), not just a small hole in the side of the rubber. So in the case of the RS, at least, a drop of water that did manage to get in, was still some distance below the fuses, and would probably fall out again anyway.

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