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Waterproof Gloves


RTRay

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I am looking for a good pair of waterproof gloves that don't cost an arm and a leg! What do you use? Have you found any to be better than others?

 

Thanks,

Terry cool.gif

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For winter only, this is the waterproof insulated glove I wear. It is comfy, has pretty good armor and a big warm gauntlet, and a thumb wiper for the shield. Workmanship is good. The insulation is thick -- if it were any thicker it would be clumsy to manipulate the turn signals.

 

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Tour Master Winter Elite Glove, $81 at http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com

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Effervescent

I have BMW's Summerrain and got them on sale off: can'trememberthesite.com

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Still weren't cheap though. Do a search and you'll find a LOT of info on rainproof gloves.

 

-Eff

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I use AlpineStars Jet Road GoreTex. Had them almost 3 years now. I ride every day, rain, hail or shine, and they work. No good in summer, unless your hands like saunas.

 

But they (perhaps) did cost an arm and a leg frown.gif My previous pair (which avoided any limb removal) were rubbish in anything but a light drizzle.

 

Dave.

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ShovelStrokeEd

+1 on the BMW Summer Rain gloves. Had mine for a couple of years now. Been through many a downpour and never got my hands wet. Even these, are a little warm though. Price you pay. I like them for all but truely heinous cold. Down to about 25 degrees or so, with Gerbings glove liners, they are fine. Below that and the heated Gerbings (old, bulky style) come out.

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If you have gloves you like, and only want to keep them dry in the rain, try Aerostitch triple digit rain gloves: HERE. Not and arm and a leg, but perhaps a thumb and a toe.

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Based on where you live and the bike you ride (very protected) are you more concerned about rain or cold? I'd think your bike gives you a lot of protection from the rain. I bought a pair of heavy, waterproof gloves, but only wore them twice. NO feel. Switched to Aerostitch's gauntlet glove. Great protection in the cold. Even on the GS, don't get very wet. Just make sure you tuck the gauntlet in your jacket so the H2O doesn't run into the glove.

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If you have gloves you like, and only want to keep them dry in the rain, try Aerostitch triple digit rain gloves: HERE. Not and arm and a leg, but perhaps a thumb and a toe.

 

I use those too, and am convinced they're better than gloves with Goretex linings, which keep the water from reaching your hands, but then the rest of the glove is soaked etc. The "lobster claws" are very easy to put on over your regular gloves, keep hands and gloves dry and pack very easily. They're Goretex, by the way.

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FWIW, try some poly glove liners INSIDE your insulated gloves/mittens. If you're planning a long trip, bring several pair and keep 'em accessible. Should the liners get wet you have two options - find a restroom with a hot air blow dryer (read: pretty much any McDonalds on this planet) -or- pull over and do a quck swap to dry liners.

 

Glove liners dry VERY quickly, and good ones (EMS, REI, many other brands) will wick effectively to help keep one's hands warm. Liners will always dry over night - not so with some of the heavily insulated gloves and mittens.

 

Another trick to accellerate the drying process of liners (and other articles of clothing): lay them flat onto a DRY towel, then roll the towel and garment and compress. The natural wicking process will quickly pull much water out of the wet garment into the towel. In a pinch I've used paper towels to help dry out glove liners and socks (yes, this may require A LOT of paper). Similarly, liners will wick water out of the insulation of soaked gloves so at the end of the day one can use any dry liners to help get the gloves dry for the next day's ride! tongue.gif

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I like the Marsee 2 in 1 Adventure gloves. They have a removable liner and are very warm, and so far never gotten wet on the inside. I first saw them in New Zealand during a tour there and that day was one of the wettest ever...the rider in our group who had them was bone dry after a full day in the rain, while my previously designated rain gloves were soaked, and that convinced me.

 

Not super heavily armored but a great glove if you want to be warm and dry, I rarely use the liners but my wife does as her hands tend to get colder than mine. $98 from Marsee but I think I paid around $70 from another website. I typically wear a large but they run a bit on the big side so I ended up with a pair of mediums.

 

http://www.marseeproducts.com/cgi-local/...15c8+1119303776

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I had the same problem several years ago, what to wear in the rain. My thoughts were that I needed something that would give me a grip on the handle bars in wet weather. I looked for waterproof gloves but they were either to hot for summer use, or just not flexible enough.

 

I then looked at a pair of diving gloves. They are meant to get wet and still maintain a good grip. Since skin is realy waterproof, it does not matter if they keep the water out, you just want some protection and some way to hold on.

 

In essence the concept is that the gloves protect your hands from hail and very heavy rain, you keep a grip on the handle bars. Without them, your hands might slip. They don't have to be water proof to do the job.

 

The only draw back is that they will get wet, they are designed to. That could wick back up under your rain gear, depending on how you have it configured.

 

Just a thought. I have riden in heavy rains many times and never regretted making that choice.

 

Jim

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Take a look at the First Gear Master Gloves.

They are listed as a summer waterproof glove but are actually almost a 4 season glove if you have heated grips. They are very windproof as well as water proof, yet breathe pretty well.

I used them on my 15,000 mile ride to Alaska and back in May and they were great.

Here is one place to check them out, but shop them online for pricing.

You will not be disappointed... JMHO

http://www.streetbikerider.com/h-apparel...n-master-06.htm

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I bought the BMW Rain gloves this summer after sweating too much in my heavy, waterproof winter gloves. After 100 miles in real heavy rain I learned lesson #1 - a lot of water runs down your arm into the glove so pull you rain gear over the top of the glove or your hands will get soaked. Second big rain lesson - with the gauntlet tucked underneath my rain suit my hands were dry but the gloves do get soaked so they don't provide a lot of warmth. Heated grips were on high. It isn't unusual in Colorado to start a day in Denver at 80+ and encounter a high pass storm below 50. I think I will add my silk liners in the next cold storm. IMHO waterproof gloves are like bikes. There isn't one type that is perfect for all conditions. Good luck.

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Back in the days when the airheads were the only boxers BMW sold a rubber glove with a liner as a "rain glove". Not available anymore but you could easily duplicate the glove by buying a heavy duty dishwashing glove and some liners. You do need the liners as they absorb the condensation inside the gloves.

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Don't know about the US, but the UK has very thin plastic gloves at the petrol stations aimed at the oil burners as the deisel does tend to leave a smell on your hands.

 

I tend to wear summer gloves all year round and when it gets real wet, I stock up on a pair of these free covers at the petrol station. I do also own a pair of Frank Thomas Aqua, which have never leaked either. The Frank Thomas only come out when I leave the house & it's raining.

http://www.scottiknights.co.uk/wpgloves.html

 

I can't find a Frank Thomas site, but the above gives you and idea of the kit.

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Believe it or not, I just went to a local Menards Builders Supply here and found a pair of rubber waterproof gauntlet gloves that go about half way up my forearm and cover my regular riding gloves perfectly. For only $9.00 I'm going to give these a try. After sticking them into a bucket of water they don't leak at all. I will have to experiment as to put them under or over my Frogg Toggs. It seems that they would work best going over the Toggs, but it is hard to tell without going out in the rain.

 

Terry cool.gif

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If you have gloves you like, and only want to keep them dry in the rain, try Aerostitch triple digit rain gloves: HERE. Not and arm and a leg, but perhaps a thumb and a toe.

DITTO - I love mine they pack small, can cover any glove I wear and are always with me.

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