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Tire Repair


Laffo IBA#34115

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Laffo IBA#34115

There is no way that repair plug will ever go into the nail hole no matter how long I rasp it out with the insertion tool.

 

Has anybody ever had any success repairing any tire with any repair kit. The CO2 canisters are handy I guess (I once filled an air shock with one) but if one cannot plug the hole.....

 

My nearly new rear Michelin tire found a very small nail. Luckily I was not very far from home when I found it and was able to ride home. When I got in the garage I pulled it out with my fingernails and the hissing started.

 

But there was no way a repair plug was going ever going to go in that nail hole.

 

So, what to do here? Replace the tire, install a tube or rasp the hole out until a plug fits. I'd really like to know what all of you think about repairing tires.

 

I'm inclined to buy a new one.

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Paul Mihalka

Buying a new one is best. I was at home in similar situation on a weekend and I wanted to ride. Instead of using the rasp I used the electric drill with a bit I thought the right size and it worked fine. I rode the weekend, no loss of air, rode a couple of more weeks, then got a new tire.

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A Dynaplug repair kit is perfect for those small nail hole repairs. Easy to use and no need to enlarge the hole and further damage the tire. I personally would have no hesitation in riding a tire so repaired to the end of its normal service life (and have many times.)

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I have repaired a couple of tires, once with the BMW kit and CO2 cartridges, and a couple of times with the tar snake. You have to use your own judgement about replacing the tire. Many here won't hesitate, many will say only fools ride with patched tires. I have had several dealers tell me they patch tires all the time, without hesitation. But, those tar snaked and mushrooms will work, regardless of what folks may say.IMO, FWIW,

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Recent experience - I run Pilot Roads on my VFR. I found the rear loosing air, 10 lbs every couple days. The culprit was an upholstery staple. Two very small holes side by side.

 

Why wouldn't you patch it? Of course, the holes were far to small to plug. My solution was to remove the tire and place a patch on the interior of the tire which worked wonderfully. I road the last 3K of the tires life without incident.

 

Before this turns into a "patch/don't patch thread", one need consider two things-

1. Is the integrity of the tire truly compromised?

2. Will a failure of my patch result in a loss of pressure such that I have insuficient time to react?

 

With my staple NO & NO, larger holes? Judgement call.

 

I would always prefer an interior patch before a plug. Plugging requires additional damge to the cord (i.e. reaming to accomodate the plug).

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Effervescent
There is no way that repair plug will ever go into the nail hole no matter how long I rasp it out with the insertion tool.

 

Has anybody ever had any success repairing any tire with any repair kit. The CO2 canisters are handy I guess (I once filled an air shock with one) but if one cannot plug the hole.....

 

My nearly new rear Michelin tire found a very small nail. Luckily I was not very far from home when I found it and was able to ride home. When I got in the garage I pulled it out with my fingernails and the hissing started.

 

But there was no way a repair plug was going ever going to go in that nail hole.

 

So, what to do here? Replace the tire, install a tube or rasp the hole out until a plug fits. I'd really like to know what all of you think about repairing tires.

 

I'm inclined to buy a new one.

 

The only thing I have to offer is a shop screw will often get folks home when they encounter a nail.

 

-Eff

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I always carry a tube of rubber cement along with my non BMW tire repair kit and I have yet to find a hole I couldn't plug. The rubber cement makes a great lubricant and after I have installed the tar type rope plug, I light the rubber cement and let it all kind of melt together for 30 seconds or so. I learned this trick 40 years ago as a kid working in a gas station. Hasn't failed me yet. As for my tire repair kit, I carry a rasp for opening and rughing it up ( carefully ) and rope type plugs and an inserter along with the rubber cement. On long trips I carry a mini compressor but I can usually plug a tire without loosing much air and then just check it at the next gas station I come to.

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Two issues: how to get home, and how long to ride a patched tire.

 

As to the first, I carry a "pocket" Stopn n Go plugger : http://www.stopngo.com/plugger.asp it has saved my bacon twice ... be sure to use it EXACTLY as instructions say. Also, a small compressor, so I can reinflate and/or change tire pressure wherever and whenever I want.

 

On how long to ride a patched tire, there are opinions all over the lot. My view is that this is a risk management issue, and I'm willing to trade some cash for what I percieve to be a risk reduction. Maybe my perception is wrong, maybe not, but I'm still happy to pay for a new tire. I also may not need to bleed brakes with new fluid every year, etc., but I do. YMMV

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Laffo IBA#34115

Ok. the tire is plugged and holding air using a somewhat heavy cord type rope thingy Wal-Mart insertion tool I previously purchased for my truck. All is back together for now but realize this is temporary.

 

What I've learned is this:

 

Have and know how to use a tire repair kit. Have enough CO2 cartridges to fill the tire to service pressure (5 considering the leaking getting it started and stopped between cartridges.

 

I have ordered and will carry the Dynaplug repair system.

 

I will order a new tire on-line for $130 versus going to Battley's tomorrow and pay $190.

 

Thank you all for your inputs. It is appreciated.

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