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Changing Brake Pads -- Bleed or not to Bleed?


nmbeemer

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I'm set to change out the front brake pads on my '99 1100RT -- but after reading the procedure in the MC FAQs page for bleeding the brake system, I'm a little leery of diving into that today. Is it possible to change the pads without bleeding the system?

 

My RT is of course the non-linked ABS model.

 

And if I have to bleed the system, how different is the procedure from the described 1150RT with the linked ABS? And where do you find those nifty bleeding tools?

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I'm set to change out the front brake pads on my '99 1100RT -- but after reading the procedure in the MC FAQs page for bleeding the brake system, I'm a little leery of diving into that today. Is it possible to change the pads without bleeding the system?

 

My RT is of course the non-linked ABS model.

 

And if I have to bleed the system, how different is the procedure from the described 1150RT with the linked ABS? And where do you find those nifty bleeding tools?

 

You should not need to bleed the brakes to change the pads. You may have to draw off some excess fluid if the level has been topped off with part-worn pads in.

 

The good news is that your R1100RT's brake system is nothing like the R1150RT's. It has a simple brake system and can be bled from the reservoir to the wheel cylinder in the normal manner.

 

In fact, if you do not know if the fluid has been changed out in the last two years, I would do it anyway.

 

Andy thumbsup.gif

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John Dickens

You don't have to bleed the brakes when you change the pads but it's not a bad idea to do so.

The new pads push the caliper pistons well back in the calipers so little or no old fluid will be left behind if you flush the system through at this time.

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Thanks guys -- what a relief! Clymer manual for my bike promises death and destruction if I attempt to bleed brakes myself without taking to a dealer.

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I bought a used '98 in summer of '05 and the prior owner had not flushed the brake system yearly as you are supposed to. While I had bike in shop for throttle cable + fast idle cable replacement and TBS, the mechanic showed me the underside of front master cylinder where the paint was eaten away. He explained that these bikes must have brake fluid flushed annually. Then, in front of me, he took out a small screw that holds this little plastic cover on the front of the master cylinder. He said "Do you see the brake fluid in there?" It cost me over a little over $200 for the front master cylinder from Chicago BMW and $140 (2hours labor) to install front master cylinder. I bled the brake system (front & rear) with Dot 4 after installing speedbleeders to keep dealership labor rate down. Keep your Dot 4 brake fluid receipt and write on it the date you flushed the brake system as proof for the next owner in addition to remind yourself of the date.

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Thanks guys -- what a relief! Clymer manual for my bike promises death and destruction if I attempt to bleed brakes myself without taking to a dealer.
That "scary stuff" only applies to the RT's from 2002 (2001 in Canada and Europe) onwards. You only risk slight bodily injury and a few downed trees and perhaps some temporary, scattered power outages if you attempt to bleed your non-EVO brake bike yourself without taking it to a dealer! grin.gif

 

Are you sure you've got the right Clymer for your model year bike? dopeslap.gif

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