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Removal of drain plug without draining


cabbage

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Reminds me of Enter the Dragon where Bruce Lee says "de ard of fidin widout fidin"

 

Anyway, enough of this brazen bafoonery. I replaced the gearbox oil some weeks ago but being a cheapskate I didn't renew the crush washer. So now I have a tiny oil leak from the drain.

 

What I need to know is.....with the bike leaning on the side stand can I remove the drain plug without losing the oil contents ie will leaning it over drop the oil level below the plug?

 

Cabbage

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The only option I see is to clean up the bottom of the tranny with some carb or brake cleaner and wipe it dry. Use a clean pail or old ice cream bucket to drain the gearbox oil into and refill. If the bottom of the tranny is clean, you should be fine. If you see junk floating in the gear oil, replace it. I always wrap the drain plug threads with teflon tape for a better seal.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
What I need to know is.....with the bike leaning on the side stand can I remove the drain plug without losing the oil contents ie will leaning it over drop the oil level below the plug?

 

No.

 

Keep the bike on the centerstand. Put a sheet of aluminum foil or plastic wrap over the bottom part of your wheel to protect it, then pull the drain plug and quickly put a finger over the drain hole. With your free hand, swap out the leaky crush washer for the good one, and then remove your finger from the drain hole and quickly install the plug. You shouldn't lose much oil.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Thanks Mitch but I'm talking about the gearbox (tranny).

 

Cabbage

 

Ah, then never mind about the wheel - but I think it's the same situation, i.e. parking on sidestand will not uncover the drain plug. It might help reduce the outflow rate though, so I'd recommend trying it.

 

More random thoughts:

 

Leaving the fill plug in will slow the outflow rate while you've got the hole exposed (but won't eliminate outflow, thanks to the inaccessible air vent at top of gearbox).

 

You'll want to protect your exhaust pipe and footpeg plate from the oil.

 

Once you're done, put bike on centerstand and check fluid level to make sure it's still OK.

 

Since finger access to the drain hole is difficult, consider a rubber stopper or a very long bolt (of same thread as plug).

 

When installing the plug, I put grease on the crush washer to help retain it on the plug, and I wrap the plug's hex with tape to retain it in the drive socket.

 

That's it, good luck. Worst case, you loose the whole load of fluid and start from scratch. But at least it won't leak this time. crazy.gif

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I'm in the same situation but not because of being cheap. The parts guy at the dealership gave me the wrong crush washers for the trans drain and refill plug, and I didn't realize it until I was in the middle of the job and committed, it was late on a Saturday and the closest dealership is about 40 miles away, so I tried using the old washers. The leak is barely noticable, but there. I went back to the dealership, went out of my way to make sure they know it is for an 1150rt and not a 1100, and guess what, I got the wrong ones again! Argh!!

 

Thanks for letting me vent, I feel better now.

 

Marlin

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TADT.

I notice that SOMETIMES when I change the trannie fluid I get a little bit of oil showing up in the drain tunnel afterwards. I shoot a bit of cleaner down inside the tunnel to clean it out, and go about my business. It seems to be just residual oil, and not a leak (at it has been on my bike).

If you are sure it is leaking and you insist on being a neatnik, you have two options:

1) Lay the bike on the left side, and then pull the drain plug. You can accomplish this by putting the sidestand up and then backing the bike out of the garage while standing on the right side. The bike will automatically lay down on its left side when you try to put it back on the sidestand. You may want to remove the left mirror first. Advanced riders can actually do this while standing on the left side of the bike.

2) Clean the drain tunnel carefully with brake cleaner. Then fill in the drain tunnel with JB Weld. lmao.gif

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That happens almost every time, regardless of the dealer.

There must be a wrong part# in BMW parts fiche or what ever the "parts desk" guys use.

I have to tell them the SIZE of washers if I want the right ones. Asking for simply "transmission drain and fill washers" will get you wrong parts almost without exception. Unless the parts guy is educated on this issue.

 

--

Mikko

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Guys, if you get the oil filter "kit" PN# 11 00 1 341 616 it contains a filter and 5 crush washers. These crush washers are for engine, tranny, and rear drive. This "kit" is for an R1150RT.

 

MIke

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Lay it down on the left side. Clean up the drain plug area. If you don't see any more leaks, then the oil level is below the drain plug. Voila! clap.gif

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My 2000 RT does not use a crush washer on the gearbox drain. Never could understand this but have never had a leak.

 

Ian

 

Some oilhead drain plugs have grooves machined into them, with matching parts on the casing and do not need the washer to seal.

 

Andy

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