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Tools to buy for tune up


texasaggie97

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texasaggie97

I wanted to see if a few of the readers would share with me the tools I should have in my tool box in order to do a tune up on my bike. I have a 2003 1150 GS. Please shoot me a list of the tools you use all the time. I am not made of money I just live to ride and I wanted to buy the tools I need to do the work myself. This bike is my baby and I want to make sure she is always running in tip top shape.

Thanks for all the help.

Todd

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Joe Frickin' Friday
I wanted to see if a few of the readers would share with me the tools I should have in my tool box in order to do a tune up on my bike. I have a 2003 1150 GS. Please shoot me a list of the tools you use all the time. I am not made of money I just live to ride and I wanted to buy the tools I need to do the work myself. This bike is my baby and I want to make sure she is always running in tip top shape.

Thanks for all the help.

Todd

 

Look for a tool list in here, starting on page 2; that ought to cover it.

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What’s in the bag?

By Tom Roe

 

Core Philosophies

Use the tools that you carry on your bike, to work on your bike.

Using the tools that you carry will help give you confidence. It quickly lets you know what you need to add to the kit. Your bike breaks down and you are stranded, in a strange place with no one for miles, the last thing you need is to do is open the factory kit and start wondering what this tube with the holes in it is for!

 

Start with the stock tool kit and work up.

Your kit has a 12mm and a 14mm end wrench but the people you are with need a 13mm. Look to add commonly used items.

 

Carrying tools that you don’t know how to use.

Although you may not know how to use a multimeter or a siphon hose, the person who stops to help you, sometimes a motorcyclist in his cage, will know how to use them.

 

Carry tools to help yourself and others.

Siphon hoses and jumper cables fall into this category.

These items require a friend. Good touring Karma

 

Upgrade the quality of your tools.

Take pride in what you carry.

They can help you or others out of a tight jam when called upon.

 

 

The tools that I carry*

*Always subject to change

First Aid Kit

Cold Pack

Space Blanket

Tow Service

Contact Sheet

Phone List

Cell Phone

Credit Card

$100 In Small Bills

Flashlight

Batteries

Tire Gauge

Duct Tape

Siphon Hose

Dual Lock

Leatherman

Multi Driver

Shock Spring Tool

3/8 Ratchet

Plug Wrench

Torx wrenches

Allen Wrenches

3mm T Handle Allen

Lug Wrench

Vice Grips

Crescent Wrench

Filter Wrench

Hemostats

Needle Nose Pliers

End Wrenches

Multi Meter

Electrical Wire

Wire Strippers

Wire Cutters

Spare Fuses

Electrical Tape

Crimp On Connectors

Zip Ties

Spare Bulbs

Tire Irons

Tire Repair Kits

WD 40

Feeler Gauges

Jumper Cable

Tow Strap

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The absolute minimum for adjusting the valves:

1. Feeler guages. Two for the intakes and two for the exhaust.

2. A short 10 mm (or is it 12 mm?) open or box for loosening the locking nut. Using a short wrench lessens the chances of overtightening stuff. There is probably one in your bike's tool kit.

I am pretty sure your bike's tool kit includes the 3 mm hex needed for the valves and the larger hex for removing the valve covers, and the spark plug wire puller and wrench.

If you are going to sync the carbs, you will need a 10 mm open wrench to loosen the throttle cable lock nut on the right TB. You also need a set of needle nose pliers to help hold the cable adjuster still when you retighten the lock nut.

And of course, a manometer, mercury sticks, carbstiks or TwinMax to balance the TB.

You will need a couple of wrenches if you are going to replace the alternator belt. Could be 15, 17 and 19, but I am not too sure.

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