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Fuel Gauge Not Working


William751

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I just got my bike out of the shop. They had to replace the fuel pump. Now the fuel gauge is not working. I looked for a wire that may have been unplugged but found nothing. Does anyone have any ideas as to a simple solution. I am trying to avoid taking the bike back to the shop. It was in for two weeks last time.

 

Thanks,

 

William

1997 R1100RT

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Thanks for the reply Edgarr. I was searching but not finding any discussions. Since you have gone through the process, would you advise a novice (me) to take everything apart or take it back to the dealer? How difficult is it to get the gas out?

 

Thanks,

 

William

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Thanks for the reply Edgarr. I was searching but not finding any discussions. Since you have gone through the process, would you advise a novice (me) to take everything apart or take it back to the dealer? How difficult is it to get the gas out?

 

Thanks,

 

William

 

They broke it, make them fix it.

 

Andy

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As Andy suggests, take it back to the dealer. The plug I struggled with was inside the gas tank. With the practice I had doing it twice I could do it in an hour and a half, but you're dealing with gasoline and gas vapors. Without the fuel pump on the gas doesn’t just run out of the fuel lines, so you have to siphon it out. The only other quick place to look is the 4 pin connector plug under the tank. You do have to remove the right side panel and find the connector, disconnect it, apply some di-electric grease on it, plug it in and hope that it helps. It is a low probability scenario as the fuel pump is also in that plug, but stranger things have happened.

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Without the fuel pump on the gas doesn’t just run out of the fuel lines, so you have to siphon it out. The only other quick place to look is the 4 pin connector plug under the tank. You do have to remove the right side panel and find the connector, disconnect it, apply some di-electric grease on it, plug it in and hope that it helps. It is a low probability scenario as the fuel pump is also in that plug, but stranger things have happened.
Hi Edgarr! wave.gif

 

I think you noticed he has lost just his RID, not the fuel pump as well (as I assume the bike still runs), but the above could be mis-leading to others trying to understand. For clarification: the two-wire connector for the RID (to the dip-tube float) is the one inside the tank and both the RID and fuel pump as well as the low fuel light (to the small float on the arm) are in the four pin connector.

 

If I were you, I would ride a few hundred miles on the tank (and/or wait for the low-fuel light to come on) then take it to them and let them futz with it. dopeslap.gif

 

Unless of course, you're miles from the dealer or you just wanted to finally figure out how all that stuff goes together for your own edification so you won't have to rely on someone else in the future! thumbsup.gif

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ShovelStrokeEd

Another small niggle. Di-electric grease is designed to prevent current flow, not enhance it. If it is a connection problem, as in pins not transferring voltage, that is exactly the wrong stuff. Better to spray a good contact cleaner on the pins and sockets.

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Another small niggle. Di-electric grease is designed to prevent current flow, not enhance it. If it is a connection problem, as in pins not transferring voltage, that is exactly the wrong stuff. Better to spray a good contact cleaner on the pins and sockets.

 

Ed: 1)What if you don't have any connection problems, and in the course of your disassembly you disconnect electrical connectors- is it okay then to use a little bit of dielectric grease on the connectors? I have always put on a little bit after separating electrical connectors.

 

2)I see your point though, when in fact you have a possibly corroded connection (like my stepdad's Lincoln driver's side window switch- got at it and used a contact stick pen from Radio Shack) it would be better to use a spray contact cleaner to dissolve the grime, dirt, and oxidation on those terminals.

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ShovelStrokeEd

Di-electric, by definition, is an insulator. Not exactly what you would want on a pin and socket connection. I understand that you would want to prevent corrosion and there are greases that will do just that while not interfering with the flow of electrons. THIS would be one example.

 

You could put this on the pins, lightly, for corrosion protection and then use the insulating grease on the outside of the plastic portions and the backs of the connectors if pins are exposed to help prevent the entry of water in the first place.

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Di-electric, by definition, is an insulator. Not exactly what you would want on a pin and socket connection. I understand that you would want to prevent corrosion and there are greases that will do just that while not interfering with the flow of electrons. THIS would be one example.

 

You could put this on the pins, lightly, for corrosion protection and then use the insulating grease on the outside of the plastic portions and the backs of the connectors if pins are exposed to help prevent the entry of water in the first place.

Sorry, Ed, I think you're wrong on this. The silver-loaded grease is certainly not suitable for general application on plugs and sockets -- is for low speed, low movement slip-rings and similar sliding contacts. To work in a plug and socket pair, you'd have to paint each contact individually, but the grease would provide a good path between any contact that it bridged. (One of its applications is for EMI grounding.)

 

Silicone grease is perfectly suitable for applying to a clean plug and socket combination. Better may be an electrical contact treatment grease, which will include cleaning and conditioning chemicals, along with a dielectric grease.

 

Dielectric in this context means that it won't cause short circuits between adjacent ways.

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For what it is worth I went ahead and tackled the project. The wire was unplugged and now everything is working fine.

 

Thanks for all of the replies and assistance.

 

William clap.gif

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Yes, it was the two wire. As stated in the thread you sent me to, it takes time to get the assembly out of the tank.

 

Doing the job has helped boost my confidence in doing some of my own work to the bike. Thanks again to you and the rest of the people on the board. It looks like I may be looking for a TechDaze soon.

 

William

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