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Foot drags?


photojournalyst

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photojournalyst

I was taking a turn to get onto a freeway ramp, and took it not too fast, but enough that I had to lay the bike over at a bit of an angle. At one point this caused my left food, which was under the shifter to rub a bit on the pavement. I was (always am) wearing my riding boots, and it only dragged a bit. None of my gear hit the pavement. Is this normal? Should I make a point not to use so harsh an angle?

 

Thanks!

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Your angle was fine. You can drag peg feelers without a problem. Of course you don't want to start dragging hard parts, but you weren't that far over.

 

But why was your toe under your shifter like that? Were you about to shift gears?

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Your angle was fine. You can drag peg feelers without a problem. Of course you don't want to start dragging hard parts, but you weren't that far over.

 

But why was your toe under your shifter like that? Were you about to shift gears?

 

I've had my feet above the shifter and brake pedal and still dragged. I was leaning pretty far though, and also getting sloppy with my foot position (heel/arch on peg, toes pointed outward a bit).

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It seems to me worth thinking several times before up shifting at heavy lean angles. At least wait a bit more towards the exit area of the turn where lean angles are less before going to the next gear. The ideal for me being to enter the turn in a rev. range where up shifting mid turn isn't needed at all.

 

It could have been very bad trouble for your foot if you'd leaned harder due to radius needs.

 

I remember Dick doesn't like it, but moving the shift side foot so the ball of your “inside the turn foot” is on the peg during the lean phase, helps keep things off the road that should be off the road (namely feet).

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I did this once in a traffic circle when I was first learning to ride. It scared the crap out of me. Now the balls of my feet stay on the pegs unless I am shifting and not in a good lean.

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Dave McReynolds

I remember Dick doesn't like it, but moving the shift side foot so the ball of your “inside the turn foot” is on the peg during the lean phase, helps keep things off the road that should be off the road (namely feet).

 

Do you recall why he doesn't like that foot position (or maybe he'll chime in)? It seems the logical place to have the inside foot to me.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Your best bet is to see if they sell a gp-shift pattern kit for the RT. tongue.gif

 

Tongue-in-cheek, I know, but for real, there ought to be just one part to replace, the shifter drum. Wonder if the Boxer Cup S-bikes have the GP shift pattern? If so, you could maybe buy the shifter drum from that bike.

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Tongue-in-cheek, I know, but for real, there ought to be just one part to replace, the shifter drum. Wonder if the Boxer Cup S-bikes have the GP shift pattern? If so, you could maybe buy the shifter drum from that bike.
I thought the GP pattern was just inverted from the street one. Always thought you could just change the linkage around to achieve that.
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ShovelStrokeEd

You can on an 1100S, just a matter of turning the shifter arm over. I have the same setup, more or less, on my Blackbird. Takes some getting used to though.

 

Better, IMHO, to just get to the gear you want for the turn, get the ball of your foot on the peg and then complete the turn. Things like on-ramps and the like give you plenty of time to choose a gear and you usually will have your choice of two. Pick one and stay in it till the bike is straightening back up and you can then easily move your foot back under the shifter. Even an RT will do something like 75 in second, that should be plenty to get you around the turn.

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photojournalyst

The boot under shifter is just a bad riding habit that I now realize I need to shed. I was getting onto the freeway, so my foot was getting ahead of me. I'll start riding with foot on top rather then under.

 

About the rev range, having track experience in a car has very nicely augmented my riding on a bike, since the apex, rev range and braking points are all pretty much the same (I'm a bit more conservative on the bike though, since I'm new to it and it can kill me easier).

 

Thanks for the input guys!

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russell_bynum
I thought the GP pattern was just inverted from the street one. Always thought you could just change the linkage around to achieve that.

 

Correct. GP is just upside-down. 1 is on top. Then you go down to neutral, 2nd, 3rd, etc. I like it MUCH better than the "normal" shift pattern.

 

I can convert my CBR back and forth in about 5 minutes, including the time it takes to find my 10mm wrench. It's not just a simple linkage flip for an RT, though.

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I like it MUCH better than the "normal" shift pattern.

 

Russell, I can understand the benefit for track riding in terms of not having to get a toe under the peg to shift it, but do you also like it better on the street? If so, why?

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I have a tendancy to point my toes out. That causes them to drag long before parts start to grind. How far we lean? I'll have to spend some time in the parking lot to see. Jim

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russell_bynum
I like it MUCH better than the "normal" shift pattern.

 

Russell, I can understand the benefit for track riding in terms of not having to get a toe under the peg to shift it, but do you also like it better on the street? If so, why?

 

I haven't ridden with GP shift on the street (The CBR is track-only, the BMW can't easily be converted, and the Tuono requires aftermarket rearsets to make the switch.) but I do believe I'd like it there, too.

 

Why? I just felt more natual to me. I can't really say more than that...it just felt better.

 

I initially decided to make the switch after doing a track day at Cal Speedway in Fontana. The last few turns are basically one big left turn leading up onto the banking on the NASCAR oval. The turn is so long that you have to shift. With a normal shift pattern, I couldn't get my foot under the shifter while the bike was leaned because I didn't have room to get my foot between the ground and the shifter. Since I made the switch, I haven't ever needed it (i.e. I haven't had any really long left turns that required shifting.) but it just instantly felt better and more natural.

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Thanks for the comments. I've always sort of felt it was awkward to shift up the way we do. Maybe a GP-style shift pattern is worth a shot?

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russell_bynum
Thanks for the comments. I've always sort of felt it was awkward to shift up the way we do. Maybe a GP-style shift pattern is worth a shot?

 

If it's an easy change on your bike, I'd say definitely give it a try.

 

I got used to it pretty quick. The first time out, the only time I had problems, was finding neutral in the pits. For some reason, I always went the wrong way for that. dopeslap.gif But I never had any issues where I downshifted to 3rd at 110mph or something when I meant to upshift to 5th.

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photojournalyst

I'm kind of curious to try this GP shift pattern. Anybody have info on the parts needed to do it with a bmw? Pointers in the right direction for me?

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russell_bynum
I'm kind of curious to try this GP shift pattern. Anybody have info on the parts needed to do it with a bmw? Pointers in the right direction for me?

 

I think it varies by model. I know it's not a simple thing on an RT. Ed indicated that it was an easy change on his S. I'm not sure what would be required for your R.

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