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Thinking Aloud about Track Day Progress


David

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The year started with me making a decision to take track work more seriously, seeing how much I could improve in one year. At the end of the year I was going to decide if it was feasible to race in some old man's class and not get my ass handed to me on a platter. The jury is definitely still out and I have nightmares that currently feature big platters. tongue.gif

 

So after a long search I bought a Tuono (still love that thing) and signed up for what would fit into a schedule that was already fairly busy. Here's my baby itching to go:

 

trailer.jpg

 

So far I've had the pleasure of doing five days at Putnam, VIR, and Barber. The rest of the year I'm signed up for ten more days, at Barber, Road Atlanta, Nashville, Blackhawk, and Carolina. If I can't answer that question after fifteen track days at seven different tracks, I need to turn my keys in and dress in a tutu.

 

So, perhaps because it helps me to articulate this, I'm going to think out loud and provide an update. If this bores you, just have fun with the pictures. But to me, it's been really serious business with a requirement for more discipline than I expected.

 

To start with, it's been a real eye opener. I've concentrated most of my efforts at one track, not just because it's a really nice one and it's really close (200 miles), but because everybody says if you can hit 1:50 at Barber, you won't be too embarrassed in WERA type racing. The track record is (I think) 1:24 something, so I'm still stupid slow. Argh. Here's a doctored picture of the track if you want to follow along. I've used the corner number scheme that you'll hear most people use:

 

trackmap.jpg

 

When I first put the Tuono on this track, I did 1:56. A week later I did a 1:51, and that's as far as I've gotten to date at Barber. I was really learning VIR, but managed a 1:59 that first morning--it's the same length as Barber. And I didn't take the timer to Putnam, as the bike had less than 100 miles and I was just learning it.

 

I'm going to do some self-criticism with these photos. They do not lie, no matter how much they don't look like I feel out there. smile.gif

 

This is most of the way through Turn 2, a long, banked turn. I should be leaned further forward. It looks like I'm riding to a church picnic:

 

sweeper.jpg

 

This is the same turn, at a later spot. Lower body is good: to the inside and butt all the way back. The forward lean is perfect (for a standard, upright bike) with bent arms. Covering brake well. Good on the pegs. Upper body should be more to the inside, though:

 

aerial1.jpg

 

This picture is the same place, on a later lap (sorry about the bad quality). I'm leaned forward even more, which is good (see the right elbow), but my upper body needs to be further toward the inside. I am looking through the turn well:

 

aerial2.jpg

 

This just shows typical body position under heavy braking at the end of the straight (from 135 mph or so down to 85 for Turn 1). It's actually a welcome relief to sit upright, stretch, and let your body (and legs) act as sails to help the braking. Turn 1 is also a blast, as it's almost impossible to take it too fast (as long as you are under 100):

 

relaxing.jpg

 

Here's the very next shot, after hitting the turn in point, but before max lean, on Turn 1. I'm in attack mode again, obviously, and body position is good. Way off the bike. Way forward. Bent, loose arms. Good on the pegs.

 

farside.jpg

 

Here's another shot that illustrates a good "looking through the turn" type vision. I can't pick out where this is on the track, but the body position is fine, albeit quite mild:

 

looking.jpg

 

This is the "hairpin," otherwise known as Turn 4. It's where most accidents are, and it's the sharpest, slowest corner. It's a double-apex turn normally taken in 2nd gear, and this picture is probably the most telling about my strengths and weaknesses at this point. On the good side, my upper body is where it should be; my eyes/head are low and forward and pointed in the right direction (see where they are in relation to the tires, pointing more forward); and arms are fine. On the bad side, my ass is way too centered. If that were off the bike more, and if I just dropped my knee, I could a) maintain a sharper radius without a greater lean angle and b) use my knee as a lean angle indicator. So that needs help.

 

hairpin.jpg

 

Take a look at this, on the same bike. Body position is perfect, and much better than mine. More specifically:

 

1) Outside arm is more bent, indicating more forward lean.

2) Lower body is more off the bike.

3) He's more skilled--and thus more relaxed--than I am.

 

sample1.jpg

 

There's another one here, though he's more an amateur like I am.

 

So that's the visual tour. If you think I'm being too analytical, you don't understand chasing speed. Period. Shaving a second off your time depends on getting 100 factors right, and you aren't going to get there without thinking, practice, and analysis.

 

So what does all this mean? I'm happy with my progress, but I've picked the low-hanging fruit and there are some serious roadblocks ahead. I know that from thinking long and deep about this, and writing it out helps me think.

 

How do I know I could go a lot faster than 1:51 at Barber? Thanks for asking. tongue.gif

 

  • I'm very comfortable at this pace.
  • There is absolutely zero drama or close calls or riding near the edge.
  • Lines are good and repeatable (when I'm concentrating).
  • Times are within 1.0 second, so it's consistent.
  • Passing is good.
  • I'm only braking on 3 of the corners! smile.gif In fact, I can do a 2:03 in 3rd/4th gear without touching the brakes. So just by braking in three freaking corners I can shave 11 seconds off the lap time. Imagine what could happen if I was going fast enough to warrant braking in all the corners.

 

But knowing I can go faster is one thing--doing it is entirely another. And here are the roadblocks I need to overcome to avoid the platter syndrome:

 

  • More braking in corners. In other words, stay on the gas longer and bleed speed with brakes. The problem I'm having is that I'm so used to a certain pace that I need to relearn everything to make this happen. I'm going to start on Sunday (the next track day), but I have a long road ahead. There's a certain urgency, seriousness, and all around commitment that comes with going so fast between corners that you have to brake before each one. I remember asking Kevin Schwantz once when he felt like he needed to start braking: "Only after I see God." grin.gif
  • Better corner exit speeds. I've been leaving my speedometer uncovered so that I can get a better sense of this. Coming out of the quick Turn 9/10 transition, I bumped it up to 86 mph. Coming out of Turn 3, after that long corner, I was able to bump it up to 92 mph. So I'm making a little progress here. It all comes down to picking the right corner entry speed, and getting to full throttle as soon as possible.
  • Turn more abruptly. Or maybe "decisively" is a better word. I'm finessing the damn thing too much--I need to flop it down fast, get back to neutral steering, and power out. I'm a wuss.
  • Body position needs to be better. More specifically, my butt needs to be back further; my upper body needs to be forward more; and my lower body needs to be more off toward the inside. (Those of you who think I ought to be doing this on a sport bike can save your breath--I'm not interested. BTDT.)
  • More lean angle. The bike can handle it--it's a mental block for me. Running around doing 1:51 lap times all day, I touched my knee maybe a half dozen times in all the sessions combined. Again, I'm a wuss. Gotta get over that. I don't mind dying--it's just the pain I'd like to avoid. Having seen at least 100 riders go down around me, I've been able to avoid that to date. Knock on extruded aluminum.

 

Now, if you've run Barber and want to know more specifically where I plan to pick up the pace, here's the plan:

 

  • Wide open on straight.
  • Faster through Turn 2 and over Turn 3.
  • Driving line through Turn 4.
  • Less slowing through Turn 6.
  • Wider line out of Turn 8.
  • Wide open through Turns 9/10.
  • Faster entry into Turn 11.
  • Better reference on climb from there forward.
  • Hold throttle longer until next to last turn.
  • Clip last apex tighter.

 

(And here's an extra credit tip that I'm learning. Reference points are not just about turn in, apex, and exit. After you have those mastered, they are more about when you can get on the gas.)

 

Am I having fun? You bet. It's highly addictive, and I really, really enjoy this. If you doubt that, consider the fact that I'm getting an average of 24.5 mpg. tongue.gif And I'm pressing street tires enough for them to get all soft and greasy. After this session, I decided to call it quits--I'd turn the bike and it didn't really want to obey all that well. grin.gif

 

tire.jpg

 

Next update is whenever I learn something significant. Might be a week or a year. smile.gif

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Well, that's just a plain butt-ugly looking tire, and I happen to have seen this very pic before (I'm keeping a watchful eye on you, young man!)

 

I know you've got the noggin' for the analysis, just curious if it is as much damned fun as you hoped it'd be. Are you grinning under that new lid? (Edit: Answered, check) Nice leathers.

 

How much of a limiting factor do you think the high Tuono bars are for quick body position transitions? Looks cramped when you have a good forward lean. Is the wind a factor in the top speeds at all, or is it a non-event?

 

Send out your remaining schedule - gotta see this for myself. thumbsup.gif

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Firefight911

David,

 

What an awesome, truthful, and insightful assessment of your riding and goals.

 

I think you're doing awesome.

 

I am posititive this does not need to be stated to you but I will throw it out there nonetheless.

 

Go after one corner at a time when you decide to improve the lap times. Once you decide on which corner to work on, pick one element of the corner, for example, entry and braking.

 

One thing to remember is that each element ties into the next. The old ankle is attached to the leg bone song!! As such, once you have worked, and improved the first elelment, you must work on learning the next element of the same corner as your reference will have changed form what you were used to.

 

And so on and so on until you have completed the entire track. Only thing to remember is that you don't want to over analyze or try to get the whole track learned in one day. Ain't gonna happen unless you have the last name of Rossi or Hayden, etc.

 

Take a break and just have a good time every once in a while and see how the changes you are making blend in with your overall.

 

And last, remember that as your times start to fall, you will face a need to change the suspension as the forces acting on it have changed. More braking, later, deeper? Perhaps a change on compression and/or pre-load to prevent too bottoming/skipping. Also, tire pressures may need some tweaking as you are generating more heat as the forces increase, etc.

 

You are on the right track (no pun intended). Stay after it. I raced from '89-'92 with my highlight being a trip to the WERA Grand National Finals at Road Atlanta in '90 and I can tell you that if you decide to race, you are going to have a blast!!!!

 

And remember, the racing in the middle and rear of the pack is just as much fun (sometimes more so!!!!!!) as it is at the front.

 

Good job!!! Thanks for the share!

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StretchMark

Good analysis.

 

The little bit of time I have been behind you on the track, I did notice that I would run up on you going in to a couple of turns, but you always get far better drive out of the turns and then you're gone. So either I have a lousy gauge of entry speeds or you really are a big puss on the brakes wink.gif. I'm guessing you will see the biggest improvement on your times with deeper braking, but you are right, it changes everything about how you take the turn and requires a lot more precision on the transition from brake to throttle to keep the chassis in that happy place.

 

I loved that new graphic they showed on the MotoGP race that compared 2 racers throttle position and braking. The edge often seemed to be gained on the brakes.

 

I also think shedding a few pounds will help me out. This "sales belly" has to go!

 

I'll also be working on better body position and brakes at my upcoming Road Atlanta and 3 Barber days. Can't wait!

 

*Edit: Oh, and what other turns at Barber would you add braking?

I can see at 1, 2 maybe, 4, 6 maybe, 8 and 14. I wonder if the fast guys brake anywhere on the back.

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I know you've got the noggin' for the analysis, just curious if it is as much damned fun as you hoped it'd be.

 

It's very fun. I'm not intimidated as much as I was. Now I genuinely look forward to every track day. I do sometimes find it impossible to concentrate that long, and I may skip the last session. I also my be defining "fun" in a different way than some people might. "Fun" to some is carefree, no agenda, no thinking. I like purpose, learning, and things that are intense enough to crowd everything else out.

 

It's a complete hoot, and you bond with other people doing it in unique ways.

 

How much of a limiting factor do you think the high Tuono bars are for quick body position transitions? Looks cramped when you have a good forward lean.

 

If the world's best rider can do a 1:24 lap on a liter bike somethingorother, he'd probably be able to get the Tuono around at 1:27 or 1:28. In other words, I don't think it's that limiting. It's just "different." The most significant factors would be keeping the front down during WFO and weighting the front tire enough in turns.

 

Is the wind a factor in the top speeds at all, or is it a non-event?

 

Not on this track (Barber), simply because it's not a fast track like Road Atlanta, Laguna, etc. The Tuono will do a true 165 mph, but the straight at Barber won't let you roll to that speed. And if it did, yes, the wind would be not only a significant drag on the bike...put it pulls your arms out of their sockets. smile.gif

 

Send out your remaining schedule - gotta see this for myself. thumbsup.gif

 

2006/07/23 Barber, STT

2006/08/06 Road Atlanta, STT

2006/08/14 Blackhawk, Code

2006/08/26 Barber, Corner Worker

2006/08/27 Barber, Corner Worker

2006/08/28 Barber, Corner Worker

2006/09/09 Barber, STT

2006/09/15 Nashville, Bargy

2006/09/17 Barber, Bogarts

2006/09/30 Carolina, STT

 

thumbsup.gif

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David

 

Check out your spine angle and the spine angle of the other rider in the last 2 pics before the tire...he is off the seat yet his spine is in a cross control position....I noticed this a while ago when on the track while following a better rider...it feels great and give you a lot more control therefore speed.....but still keeps your wieght to the inside.....I don't know if I explain that very well crazy.gif

 

Gleno's avatar is another example of this....

 

 

 

 

Whip

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Go after one corner at a time when you decide to improve the lap times. Once you decide on which corner to work on, pick one element of the corner, for example, entry and braking.

 

Thanks, Phil. I was hoping someone with significant experience would chime in and give me some pointers. I'm all ears.

 

What you are saying makes sense, too. I'll start at Turn 1 and see how that works. It's at the end of a long straight, anyway, so I can get a good drive onto the straight, hold my speed until a certain marker, and then keep moving it forward. Besides, Turn 1 is pretty safe, with a nice gravel pit and tons of width. smile.gif

 

And last, remember that as your times start to fall, you will face a need to change the suspension as the forces acting on it have changed. More braking, later, deeper? Perhaps a change on compression and/or pre-load to prevent too bottoming/skipping. Also, tire pressures may need some tweaking as you are generating more heat as the forces increase, etc.

 

Twi more good points. On the shocks, I'm extending the front completely (as the front skims the surface, powering out of corners), and I have about an inch of travel left under compression. I'll keep an eye on it. Right now I'm using settings that I paid a professional to set for me, and the difference it makes is astounding. I can now hold a much tighter line.

 

I'm using 31.5 lbs front/back right now, and plan to increase it 0.5 lbs. I've switched to Pilot Power tires, too, so I'm going to have to learn how they perform vs. the 207RR that came with the bike.

 

You are on the right track (no pun intended). Stay after it. I raced from '89-'92 with my highlight being a trip to the WERA Grand National Finals at Road Atlanta in '90 and I can tell you that if you decide to race, you are going to have a blast!!!!

 

So, do you miss it? Ever want to start up again? It takes quite a commitment.

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Check out your spine angle and the spine angle of the other rider in the last 2 pics before the tire.

 

Yep. That's definitely my problem. In that picture you reference, my upper body is too far off and my lower body is not far enough off. That creates some difficulties in actually controlling the bike because of my arm position.

 

Lots to work on. crazy.gif

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The little bit of time I have been behind you on the track, I did notice that I would run up on you going in to a couple of turns, but you always get far better drive out of the turns and then you're gone.

 

Thanks. That confirms what I've been sensing about entry speed. Gotta fix that.

 

*Edit: Oh, and what other turns at Barber would you add braking? I can see at 1, 2 maybe, 4, 6 maybe, 8 and 14. I wonder if the fast guys brake anywhere on the back.

 

Right now I'm braking before Turn 1, Turn 4, and Turn 6. The big corner I can make a lot of time on carrying more speed through Turn 13 and then braking before Turn 14. That's a biggie. The next biggest place to pick up a few seconds is before Turn 11. I should be able to hit 120 at that point. If I can grow some. smile.gif

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Firefight911

Something to think about. Not to take ANYTHING away from your current set up as times have changed BUT you state your suspension has approximately 1 inch of travel left under compression. Since your front forks have 4.7 inches of total travel, that means you are leaving 20-25% of travel unused.

 

As a rule of thumb, I would set my bike up so that I would lightly bottom out in the corner with either the most compressive forces or the one with the most bumps (kind of the same thing but you get it).

 

Allowing your suspension to free up is huge and pays huge dividends in feel and feedback during entry, transition, and exit. Double check your static pre-load and really pay attention to feel while out on the track. Keep a detailed log starting with static settings. Need to be able to get back to your baseline when you screw it up, and you will!! Everyone does.

 

As for your other questions:

 

Yes, I sorely miss it!!!!

Yes, I want to desperately get back on the track regularly. As a matter of fact, I just stepped in to help coordinate my BMW clubs annual track days event.

Yes, it took a HUGE commitment of time, money, and energy. I raced the 600cc class on an FZR-600 and it was everything I could do to keep the horsepower robbing weight down! I am 6'2" and 205 lbs right now. When I raced, I was betwenn 175' and 185'. Can you say workout!

 

Fortunately, I was able to realize my dream and garnered sponsorship although my best ever finish was fifth. Home track was Willow Springs.

 

Hopefully, I will be able to secure a dedicated track bike within the next year and get regular on the track circuit, although this time as an enthusiast and not a red mist racer . . . I think. As you know, the bug, when it bites, doesn't let go too easily!

 

I was just editing my spelling errors and re-reading my post and it occurred to me that your suspension travel issue could be all that is holding you back under braking. Perhaps, subconsciously, you are not feeling what the bike is doing under braking and it causes you some uncertainty. Could be a preload or compression damping issue? Also, when transitioning, if you have too much preload you may feel the back "springing" back a bit abruptly.

 

Just thinking out loud as well!

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sample1.jpg

 

So much for "it's the handlebars". WOW.

 

If you're going to be scientific, can you buy other sending units and use the lap-timer for segment times instead?

 

I was at Barber on Sunday, July 2nd and WOW again. I use to think the Glen was nice, and then Mid-Ohio, but Barber has to be the nicest road course in the US now.

 

-RickP.

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Rick, the timer I have (UltraLap) has the capability built-in. And since there are always several transmitters at the track, it's just a matter of throwing one on the wall somewhere and flipping a switch to configure it for split times.

 

Were you visiting Barber, or on the track?

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Outstanding self-analysis!!! It appears you have a good handle on what will improve your times. Your sort of thinking and analyzing is what it will take. When working on later braking avoid falling into the trap of over braking due to rushing the entry and getting mentally “out of precise judgment” just a tad when it comes to setting mid corner speed.

 

I assume you are trail braking.

 

It is totally impossible to tell from still photos, however going by them alone, it would appear your mid turn speeds are a bit lower than the rider in the example you posted. I say that as your bike lean angles appear to be less acute than his. Of course it is a still photo, taken at a specific spot and time, so that reading could be quite mistaken.

 

The difference there could be tires also, as you want tires that will stick solid down at the edge.

 

I enjoyed your post, nice photos, good thinking.

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Were you visiting Barber, or on the track?

 

Well I want to be on it now! We spent most of a 95 degree day in the museum during a 10-day trip. (Down 81 was the only way out of DC that wasn't pouring.) What a place! And of course they have one of everything I ever wanted when I was 16-20 years old.

 

Continued west, came up the trace, then used that great 70S / 30 route you told me about last year before heading north into KY.

 

Anyway, I mentioned the segment timing as opposed to "one corner at a time". Maybe because of the elevations at Barber you could even get some rough handheld segment times for the leaders at a WERA event.

 

And as the Skip Barber guys said to me years ago, "Little nibbles, Rick. Little nibbles." You can imagine the rest.

 

Superbike School at Mid-Ohio in two weeks! Keep posting these threads!

 

Think speed not pain (easier with a roll cage)

 

-RickP.

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I was just editing my spelling errors and re-reading my post and it occurred to me that your suspension travel issue could be all that is holding you back under braking. Perhaps, subconsciously, you are not feeling what the bike is doing under braking and it causes you some uncertainty. Could be a preload or compression damping issue?

 

There could be a problem with that, but it's too early to tell. There really is no scientific measurement for compression damping like there is for preload/sag, so it's a matter of experimenting. Where I am braking, I am braking fairly intensely. As I begin to work on that part of my riding more, I'll keep this in the back of my mind.

 

Thanks!

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When working on later braking avoid falling into the trap of over braking due to rushing the entry and getting mentally “out of precise judgment” just a tad when it comes to setting mid corner speed.

 

Yes, indeed. When experimenting with heavier braking in the last session, I realized how much learning I have to do. I was clearly "out of precise judgment," and when that happens, things can easily "pile up" and then you get behind the bike. Not good, and it almost happened to me.

 

I assume you are trail braking.

 

Yes. But only with the front brake at the moment, as the rear on my Aprilia is worthless and not worth the effort. I need to look into. But yes, I'm trail braking with the front. With the suspension dialed in, now, the bike is very behaved.

 

It is totally impossible to tell from still photos, however going by them alone, it would appear your mid turn speeds are a bit lower than the rider in the example you posted. I say that as your bike lean angles appear to be less acute than his. Of course it is a still photo, taken at a specific spot and time, so that reading could be quite mistaken.

 

Yes, you are correct.. It's mainly a mental block at this point. Honest to goodness, if I could get some psychologist to adjust my internal lean indicator I could make quicker progress. The first time I ever rode a street bike was on my 40th birthday--my entire experience before that was off-road, and I wonder if I developed some narrow, bad habits about leaning. Who knows.

 

The difference there could be tires also, as you want tires that will stick solid down at the edge.

 

The first set was 207RR. I just put Pilot Power tires on. Honestly, I'm not fast enough to press the tires. There was a lot of sliding when greasy, but that's because I should have changed them earlier. There's some sliding from the rear under power and leaned over, but it's very controllable. I might need stickier tires at some point, but I'm guessing not. There's lots of stick left.

 

Thanks for your feedback!

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Take what I going to say with a big grain of salt here as I am more deeply steeped in dirt racing. Consider opinions from good riders at the track you are running on also, from whatever ones who are willing to give you feedback.

 

To me it sounds like you have the increasing throttle exit phase well in hand. That being the case it makes sense to me to work backwards from that, rather than both ends to the middle.

 

A bit of an increase in mid turn speed should pay larger dividends on long higher speed turns than an increase in braking efficiency (unless you were terrible at braking).

 

It does increase risk as you leave less and less traction for throttle and brakes when the lean gets really down there. Though you should have enough traction to gently effect a 40% front/60% rear weight transfer even at maximum lean for the bike and radius.

 

A combination of hanging off further with good form, to lessen lean angle (important piece of the puzzle, and it takes time to get used to operating the bike from the new position)… then an increase in mid turn speed to bring lean angle back down further (so long as traction remains for it) should drop lap times, especially making up time lap after lap in the faster turns. Don’t over push the tighter slower turn. There is far less to be gained there.

 

There will be a difference in when and how you go to the throttle and you will need to work out how to maintain your throttle up areas early enough. A combination of picking the bike up a tad on exit to maintain the same drive out, a line that allows for throttle increase/picking up bike at the spot in your line where you need it, and a smooth throttle hand, should be able to be found which integrates correctly with your new mid turn speed ability.

 

When you have your mid turn matching your exit abilities better, the lap times should have dropped. You will be able to see what benefit vs risk ratio is existing via lap time improvement or not. Though getting that new combination of bike lifting, throttle, and line down, for good exit, correctly matched to the new mid turn speed, will have something to do with what you see in lap times also. If you are needing to wait significantly longer to get on the gas because of extra mid turn lean angle, the lap times won’t show what they can.

 

Then you can work on later braking while trying to integrate that with the same newly found mid corner speed settings.

 

Later braking will be the greatest advantage on tracks with high straight speeds and slower speed turns at the end.

 

I write for you to consider working from your strength on the exit phase, back to the mid-turn, back to braking, for this reason.

 

If you dial in later braking to nail your present mid turn speeds, THEN you work on mid turn speeds… A.) They will be harder to work on due to your newly increased braking efforts, and B.) after you do get the mid turn speeds up some you will then have to redo your late braking to match the new mid turn speeds. You will be doing your later braking work twice over.

 

As to lean angle increase… Find a skid pad (or skid pad like area) big enough to do a nice large enough radius circle. Do the circle setting your body position good and getting to your normal comfort lean angle. Then tighten the circle radius up a small bit while feeling traction at the tires. Do both directions and not enough rounds in the same direction to get dizzy-ish. Just gingerly experiment with small increments of tightening the radius, which will increase the lean angle. Groove in a new lean angle that is better, but not too radically different from you previous norm, then go out and CAREFULLY experiment on the track with it.

 

Shift back and forth between skid pad circle work, and track work, and you should be able to find a race lean angle for yourself that you can consistently deal with adequately. Remember to be extra smooth on throttle and brake changes at higher lean angles. They are decidedly riskier, so pick one that fits your skill and risk level comfort.

 

Realize that skill and risk level comfort COULD be THE lean angle you are ALREADY using now, and you might not want to over push the issue until later in your racing career. If that turns out to be the case, forget what I said about working on mid turn speed first, and go to braking until (and IF) you feel ready to accept the additional risk and skill requirement of increased mid turn speeds.

 

I think you would get a little better mid turn speed right at your PRESENT lean angle by hanging off some more. Again it takes practice time to be able to judge things as well from a new body position. There is no point in rushing any of this stuff. Just pick one thing to work on at time, and get comfortable with it, then move on.

 

All of this is just possible suggestions, and again, take it with more than a few grains of salt. Just consider what part of it if any, makes sense to you given the environment you and the bike are in, at the time you are in it.

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1491.jpg

 

Okay. That was one fun--and productive--day. I'll try to keep this short, as I've just pulled in and unloaded and it's been a long day.

 

I spent the day at Barber with a STT day on the track. My personal best before today was 1:51.

 

Session No. 1: The transmitter wasn't working, so I didn't get lap times. Probably wouldn't have mattered, anyway, as I was on brand new Pilot Power tires and I was trying to wake up, as we hit the track early at 8:30a. Not only that, but one guy went down bad in the hairpin and they red flagged the rest of the session. The operative word for this session (for me) was "clearing the cobwebs."

 

Session No. 2: I made the focus working on my body position. (See the beginning of this thread for the self-critique). Oddly enough, right turns are easier for me, which has never been true before. I suppose it's because Barber is largely composed of right handers.

 

I forced my knee down, not because I needed it (right then) for speed, but because I wanted to force body position--getting my ass further off the seat--while I learned the finer points of controlling the bike in that position.

 

My lines were bad. Ran wide several times. Not off the track, but outside the race line. There was no sense of pacing or being in a groove.

 

Best time was 1:56.

 

Session No. 3: Since the previous session was largely a failure and it was looking like a really long day, I decided to slow down and start at the basics again. I needed faultless lines and good body position in order to regain some confidence. "It's not about how fast you go, but how you go fast."

 

Best time was 1:57, but it was firmly in control, unlike the 1:56 in the previous session. tongue.gif

 

Session No. 4: After lunch, I was in the right frame of mind, but it was hot. Mid 90s and very humid, as only a southern state like Alabama can be in July. The focus was on keeping my lines and body position, and slowly crank it up. I decided to stay in 3rd/4th gear and limit attention-grabbing issues. I also decided to not really work on braking. I was still only braking in three corners, but I was braking deeper (waiting longer and braking harder). I also worked on setting my body up earlier, with more time to go before dipping it in.

 

I could feel myself peeking up to the next level, getting a glimpse of what was just around the corner, so to speak. You know how you can feel the world opening up in a particular skill, even if it's just to the next level with many more levels to go? That's how it felt, and largely because I've been thinking more about this stuff--trying to be a bit more analytical.

 

I hit a 1:50, which was a new personal best for me. Yeah, baby! thumbsup.gif There was still some slop, though, and I missed two upshifts (unusual for me, and definitely out of character for the Tuono), and I screwed up one downshift by activating the slipper clutch. Just mental laziness, but understandable since I had less mental bandwidth to spare.

 

But largely, it felt clean and safe. Felt good, too.

 

Session No. 5: What was this going to hold? Was the 1:50 just a fluke? Could I set another better time in the same day? Not on this session, but I did lay down a 1:51 lap and then four 1:50 laps in a row. That gave me a lot of confidence because I knew then that it wasn't just a fluke. And when I can consistently do one time, I can usually step up to the next level. At least that's the way it's worked in the past.

 

Session No. 6: As noted above, it was a very, very hot day. Lots of accidents, too, including some ambulance rides. The guy next to me in the pits had a beautiful Mille until someone ran into him coming out of the bowl as they crested the hill. He lost control, high sided, and he and the bike ran into the barrier. The bike was totaled and he broke a lot of things. The STT dragged it out on a trailer and told us to take it off. I grabbed five other guys and we loaded it in his pickup truck. He was alone, so I figured we could at least do that. I almost covered it up so he wouldn't barf when he saw it. Three other people went down right in front of me. Argh.

 

1492.jpg

 

1493.jpg

 

1494.jpg

 

1495.jpg

 

All this to say that people were starting to make mistakes. I'd never done more than five sessions in a day, either, but decided to give it one more shot. I put one of those breathing strips on my nose, took some more Ibuprofen, swallowed two more potassium tablets, grabbed some fresh ear plugs for good measure, and headed out with a grin. I moved to the hot pit lane early so that I could get a few clean laps without having to pass any riders.

 

We finished the tire warm-up lap and immediately someone passed me. I thought: "Heck, maybe I should see if he can pull me around a bit." So I worked hard to catch him, and did in about a half lap. Then we put down a few laps. I decided to not look at the timer until each lap had finished. 1:51 was first.

 

Then I felt a good one unfolding, and then I hit my goal for the year:

 

1496.jpg

 

Woohoo!!!! grin.gif That probably seems silly to some of you, but for a long time I've wanted to break into the 1:40s, albeit barely. So I set that as a goal, and I've hit it already.

 

Most of all, though, is the new confidence. Figuring out what I was doing wrong with my body position changed everything. The most important is that I broke the mental barrier of lean angle, and it happened just like magic. A lean angle that would have freaked me out a bit ago now feels like child's play. It's a huge break through for me, and I can't wait to see what's next. The bike felt like a toy, and I could feel the pavement and the loss of grip when I needed to, etc. When I look back on this, it'll look stupid slow and I'll smirk at myself, but I feel like I've broken through a barrier and now have lots of other things to explore.

 

Damn, that was a good day. smile.gif

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Congrats on a great day...I hate the site of wrecked bikes..

 

Maybe we should look into an endurance race team...2 bikes 4 to 6 guys....travel around.....have fun....What do ya think??

 

Whip

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Sounds fun to me. Actually, endurance stuff is MORE interesting than some of the other choices. I like the team thing, and I like the need to run consistently.

 

Maybe we could line up a good sponsor? tongue.gif

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Firefight911

Congrats! I know how big an accomplishment this is for you. Enjoy it because you have truly earned it!!!!

 

Next thing is to consistently rip off a string of 1.49's and feel the change.

 

I like to use analogies to most things and there really is no better analogy then a staircase. You have finally stepped up to the next stair. And the best thing I see in what you have written is your lack of ego!!! Humble accomplishement will keep you rubber side down and continually improving.

 

As for the endurance racing, yea baby! No better way to get some track time than that. You get lots of chances to lead, follow, and observe many different lines and styles.

 

I will never forget running practice and an endurance race at Road Atlanta in 1990 and getting the chance to watch Mike Smith and Scott Russell run around the track with me as their personal moving chicane!!!

 

There is not much like it when you are going down the back straight of Road Atlanta WOT as you enter the gravity cavity and see, no feel is a better word as they really were a blur, Russell or Smith fly by.

 

Damn, I'm doing 155 mph and they go by like I'm standing still!!!!!! What a rush!

 

I digress, sorry!!!!

 

Do the endurance racing! Geritol, Cialis, Viagra, Midol, Pamprin are all untapped sponsors! Well, I guess Mark Martin had the Viagra thing!!

 

Seriously, great job on your session and DO THE ENDURANCE RACING. There is no substitute to this for getting lots of seat time. It's like going to an extended school lecture!!!

 

Just pick someone close to you in style and size. I had an endurance partner for a Willow Springs race that was 50 lbs. lighter than I. That and he had a completely different bike set up from what I liked. Made for a long 6 hour endurance race in the hot desert sun!!! bncry.gif

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Thanks, Carl. I read your suggestion carefully about concentrating on corner speed rather then braking, and followed that advice. So thank you very much! smile.gif

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Next thing is to consistently rip off a string of 1.49's and feel the change.

 

I'm pretty confident I'll be able to do that, since the previous session I put down four laps in a row within 1 second of that time. Laying down consistent times is really a key for me. It forces a certain level of concentration and execution that's very much worth concentrating on.

 

As for the endurance racing, yea baby!

 

A lot of things have to happen before I even consider that, frankly. I'm not near good enough yet. If I ever get to that point, I'd have to be willing to make the time/money investment, and I'm not at this point. And finally, Julie would have to be comfortable with it--and she'd definitely not there yet. tongue.gif

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russell_bynum

1. Excellent thread.

2. Congrats on your progress!

3. You're still a putz. grin.gif

 

Man, I love track days! The level of attention you're talking about is only obtainable if you push everything else out of your head, and it is really relaxing.

 

I find that, during a really good session, I don't notice ANYTHING that isn't directly related to helping me make the laps. I don't know where Lisa was standing to take pictures, I don't notice the dust from the crash at the next track over, I haven't looked at my laptimer at all, etc. When I get in, I discover that I've bested my previous lap record, and I didn't even feel like I was going fast.

 

I tend to think about the track in sections first, then individual corners. i.e. sometimes the fastest way through a given section is to sacrifice a corner or two. At Streets of Willow, I discovered that if I took T4 really tight and held my turn-in for T5 about a bike length or so past where my brain was telling me I should go, it put me in a better place for T6, which gave me a good drive into T7...which gives me a good drive out of T8 onto the back straight. But if you blow T4 and you're screwed all the way to the end of the back straight.

 

I think you're pretty good at figuring that stuff out, but it's been something that I've only recently been able to put to use.

 

Like you, I'm also generally a wuss on the brakes. When I'm not really confident with my entry speeds and RP's for a given corner, I generally set up so I'm not braking at all. As I get more comfortable, I'll move the braking marker closer and closer, but I still try to get out of the brakes a second or two before I turn the bike so that the suspension has time to settle down before I tip it in.

 

If I'm really feeling good about a particular corner, then I'll go ahead and brake pretty hard, and try to be trailing the brakes off at the same rate that I'm adding cornering force so that the suspension doesn't move. I'm still not very good at that (and I've only had a couple of places where everything else was feeling solid enough to even try it), but when I get it, it feels really awesome.

 

Also, it helps me a bunch if the turn is forgiving. For example, I was doing my best late-braking coming into T3 at Pahrump. If you screw up there, you just stand the bike up and run across the concrete apron, so it's really no big deal. Some of the other turns are far less forgiving, so I'm less willing to push things there. So..if you're anything like me (and I know I am) you're a wuss on the brakes because you don't have solid RP's yet.

 

If I've got really good RP's for a turn (and like you said...it isn't just about entry/apex/exit...there's braking RP's, Get on the gas RP's, pick the bike up RP's, etc), then I can start stretching them a little. I'll go a half a bike length past my braking RP before getting on the brakes. Or I'll get on the gas a half a bike lenght before my "get on the gas" RP. Then, as things compress, I wind up picking new RP's. For a while, I'm generally all out of shape again until I get really solid with those new RP's.

 

What are you hoping to accomplish by looking at your speedo? It seems to me that your entry/exit speed in MPH is somewhat irrelevant. If you've got good RP's, you should be able to tell if you did "that one" faster because your RP's aren't right anymore. For example...if you get a better drive out of a corner, naturally you'll have higher exit speed, but you'll also arrive at the next turn's braking marker at a higher speed, so you'll either have to move it back, brake harder, turn quicker, or run wide. You can also tell by your gear changes. When I finally got enough RP's in the bowl (T8) and found a line that worked for me, I found myself on the rev limiter in 3rd before I had even picked the bike up yet. Before, I would be through the turn and be tucked in on the straight before I needed to shift to 4th. Nailing T8 allowed me to get on the gas sooner and harder, which meant I was having to shift gears sooner. It was an easy measurement to tell if a parituclar line was better or worse, and it's something that I'm already paying attention to. With the Speedo, it doesn't tell me anything useful other than my speed at that particular point in that particular corner, and the downside is that it's more distractions from the stuff that really matters.

 

That's my $0.02 anyway...I'm interested to hear your take on it.

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I find that, during a really good session, I don't notice ANYTHING that isn't directly related to helping me make the laps. I don't know where Lisa was standing to take pictures, I don't notice the dust from the crash at the next track over, I haven't looked at my laptimer at all, etc. When I get in, I discover that I've bested my previous lap record, and I didn't even feel like I was going fast.

 

Me too. I saw several people go down this time, and you just take it in stride without even getting off the gas. You just register it on the side of your brain and make an instantaneous judgment about whether they pose a danger to you.

 

I tend to think about the track in sections first, then individual corners. i.e. sometimes the fastest way through a given section is to sacrifice a corner or two. At Streets of Willow, I discovered that if I took T4 really tight and held my turn-in for T5 about a bike length or so past where my brain was telling me I should go, it put me in a better place for T6, which gave me a good drive into T7...which gives me a good drive out of T8 onto the back straight. But if you blow T4 and you're screwed all the way to the end of the back straight. I think you're pretty good at figuring that stuff out, but it's been something that I've only recently been able to put to use.

 

trackmap.jpg

 

I do kind of the same thing by putting relevant turns together into one section. So at Barber, that's the first left hand (Turn 1) through the beginning of the straight over the hill (Turn 3). How you come out of Turn 3 has virtually no impact on Turn 4, as there's plenty of room to correct any line errors. So the way I think of the sections at Barber:

 

1-3

4-5

6-10

11-15

 

What are you hoping to accomplish by looking at your speedo? It seems to me that your entry/exit speed in MPH is somewhat irrelevant.

 

That's not the way I think of it, as I'm looking for two things. If I exit a corner at the right place and if my exit speed is good, I've nailed it pretty well. Just like a lap time is a gross measurement device for the lap as a whole, corner exit speed breaks it down corner by corner. Having the proper exit speed and exit line means I did a lot of other things right, and it's really educational to see the exit speed vary. (I may only look at it twice in a lap.) Take Turns 1-3, for example. A good exit speed (for me) at the top of the hill out of Turn 3 is 105 mph. Anything less than that and I've screwed up.

 

As my corner exit speeds have built, I've also had to change gearing. I'm hitting the rev limiter in 4th at several places now.

 

Have you heard of trap speeds? This is just a cheap way to do it instead of hiring someone with a radar gun. tongue.gif It's a way of dissecting a corner and achieving repeatability.

 

Eventually I'll never look at it, but right now it's helpful.

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David,

 

Great analysis -- I'm always amazed at thow you can be so analytical about something so emotional, but that's what it tkaes really.

 

I'll throw two things out there that might help you moving forward:

 

1. There's no reason not to be wide open throttle on any decent length straight once you've completed corner exit and gotten it standing upright. Just do it and be prepared to brake sooner if you need to.

 

2. Moving to the next level is always a challenge. What I mean there is that you are now at a fairly comfortable level where you know what you are doing right and wrong, your lap times are very consistent and you can do it all day long at that level. That's a great thing that most people never get to experience. But the trick about going faster is gettting a bit out of your comfort zone. The speed gained each time is less and less, but to get that extra second, or tenth, you've got to do something that might not be too comfortable the first few times you do it.

 

Pick one "scary" thing at a time in the right place and work on that. Increase lean angle, brake later (progressively), get on the gas sooner, try more corner speed than you're used to. Any one of those things will help, but just be ready to be a bit scared and don't react out of surprise when you are.

 

Have a blast.

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1. There's no reason not to be wide open throttle on any decent length straight once you've completed corner exit and gotten it standing upright. Just do it and be prepared to brake sooner if you need to.

 

Definitely. I'm at wide open throttle many times--I think I let off too early, though. I'm working on that, but it's a weakness at the moment.

 

Pick one "scary" thing at a time in the right place and work on that. Increase lean angle, brake later (progressively), get on the gas sooner, try more corner speed than you're used to. Any one of those things will help, but just be ready to be a bit scared and don't react out of surprise when you are.

 

Good point. It's what keeps me really enthused an entire day--there's never a lack of things to work on. The key is to be patient and work on them slowly.

 

It's odd, no? Someone is reading this thread and saying "how do I reconcile 'scary' with 'fun'"? smile.gif

 

Thanks for the feedback. When are we going to do this again? We need to do Barber together.

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A quick side question; David, what did you think of the Pilot Powers compared to the 207RR, especially leaned over (they couldn't have been bad considering you lowered your lap times and became more comfortable at increased lean angles). I was wondering if you noticed any distinguishing characteristics, and if they lasted as long.

 

I'm thinking of trying a set on a bike of mine instead of the Metz. M3 I've run.

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A quick side question; David, what did you think of the Pilot Powers compared to the 207RR, especially leaned over (they couldn't have been bad considering you lowered your lap times and became more comfortable at increased lean angles).

 

Here's the difference between the two.

 

The Pilot Power has full stick after 1.0 warmup laps. The 207RR takes 1.5 laps.

 

The Pilot Power rear spins up less under power, leaned over.

 

They seem to have the same turn-in characterists.

 

They provide the same feedback at the edge of traction.

 

=====

 

I measured tread depth before and after six hard sessions, and couldn't measure any wear on the rear. So I suspect they'll provide plenty of tread depth (6mm), and you'll end up swapping them after they've been through enough heat cycles.

 

=====

 

For a DOT non-race tire, check out these mighty impressive stats: 50.6 degrees of lean on dry pavement and 41.9 degrees of lean on the wet pavement. That's pretty remarkable.

 

I already ordered a second set. thumbsup.gif

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So, do you think that all of your track work is leading to you eliminating street riding altogether?

 

It has occurred to me, but it has not been a serious temptation.

 

For the undisciplined rider, there's no additional safety on the track. But there's substantially greater safety for the disciplined rider.

 

I love street riding for different reasons than track work. Just like you might have a dedicated track bike and a dedicated street bike, I have different purposes for each venue.

 

On the street, I enjoy the variety, the scenery, and the unexpectedness of each corner. I love the high value it places on reading road surfaces and the dozens of adjustments necessary for each curve.

 

What has changed for me on the street is this: less need for speed, and far less patience in riding with incompatible companions.

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It's odd, no? Someone is reading this thread and saying "how do I reconcile 'scary' with 'fun'"?

 

Thanks for the feedback. When are we going to do this again? We need to do Barber together.

 

 

That's funny, I never thought of it that way! Yeah, I guess it's one of those, "you get it or you don't" kind of things.

 

And believe me, coming off the MotoGP weekend, I'm having SERIOUS track withdrawal! It probably won't happen in the short-term, but maybe in the spring. Let's hope so...

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russell_bynum

Have you heard of trap speeds? This is just a cheap way to do it instead of hiring someone with a radar gun. It's a way of dissecting a corner and achieving repeatability.

 

OK, I gotcha. I was thinking that you were looking at every corner. If you're just looking at the end of each section to see how you did on that section, that's probably more worthwhile.

 

How do you define the "corner exit" so you know you're always looking at the speedo at the same place?

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How do you define the "corner exit" so you know you're always looking at the speedo at the same place?

 

I don't have a marker or anything scientific. Basically just when I pick the bike up and could sit my ass in the middle again, even though I don't actually move.

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russell_bynum
How do you define the "corner exit" so you know you're always looking at the speedo at the same place?

 

I don't have a marker or anything scientific. Basically just when I pick the bike up and could sit my ass in the middle again, even though I don't actually move.

 

OK, so there's a margin of error there of probably a few mph.

 

Trap speeds would be at the end of a straight, but you've got your hands full at the end of the straights, and looking down at your speedo is probably not the first thing on your mind. smile.gif

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russell_bynum

For a DOT non-race tire, check out these mighty impressive stats: 50.6 degrees of lean on dry pavement and 41.9 degrees of lean on the wet pavement. That's pretty remarkable.

 

I already ordered a second set. thumbsup.gif

 

I run Pilot Powers on my CBR on the track and couldn't be happier. I'm at knee-down lean angles in the slower turns almost immediately. Like you said, they come up to temp pretty quick. At Pahrump, I was knee-down in turn 4 on the first lap most of the time (T4 is fairly slow), and after 1 lap, I was diving into T1 at speed without any worries about grip.

 

I've got 6 track days on this set. Tread is getting a little worn, but they could probably do another day without any issues. I'll probably replace 'em though, just to be safe.

 

Wheelspin hasn't been much of an issue, but I'm on a 600 inline-four vs. your 1000cc twin, so I'm not putting nearly as much power to the ground.

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Wheelspin hasn't been much of an issue, but I'm on a 600 inline-four vs. your 1000cc twin, so I'm not putting nearly as much power to the ground.

 

That, and the issue of differing technique/skill. tongue.gif

 

(Just kidding.)

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and far less patience in riding with incompatible companions

 

Yeah, I notice you no longer write. tongue.gifgrin.gif

 

I am hoping to do some track days next year. I've done several in cars, but never on a bike.

 

My motivators will be a bit different from what you use. I need to regain confidence, develop better control, learn how to drag my knee -- on purpose eek.gifwink.gif -- and I want to know what it feels like to ride a circuit without the fear of traffic issues, etc.

 

I'm looking forward to exposing myself to this drug! cool.gif

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Well, let'd do it together, then. I'll come up to Putnam or you come down here. smile.gif

 

You're on, for sure!

 

I can start in the "Fisher Price" class. smirk.gif

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russell_bynum
Wheelspin hasn't been much of an issue, but I'm on a 600 inline-four vs. your 1000cc twin, so I'm not putting nearly as much power to the ground.

 

That, and the issue of differing technique/skill. tongue.gif

 

(Just kidding.)

 

LOL!!!

 

It's funny, but at Pahrump, I was deliberately trying to get on the gas hard enough to spin the rear, just to see what it felt like. It would only do it over the bump in T10. I'm sure that's just because I don't have to stones to whack the throttle open hard enough yet, but I did find it funny that I couldn't even MAKE the thing spin.

 

T10 was pretty fun, though. I could really feel the traction going away in the bump and the rear would start to step out as the RPM's came up.

 

If I picked the bike up right as I felt the traction start to go away, it would hook up immediately and never really spin. If I waited until it was spinning, I could control how sideways I got by how late I picked it up. Of course, "sideways" for me is not the same "sideways" that Tommy saw on Saturday when he steamed around the outside of Miguel, but it felt pretty fun for me anyway. cool.gif

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Well, I certainly don't have advice for you (in fact, your thread is serving as advice for me). Actually, reading this thread has somewhat discouraged me, as I feel I may never be analytical enough for this track thing that I so enjoy! crazy.gif Some of the physics of the sport are hard enough for me to grasp sitting here reading it, much less DOING it out on the track!

I've caught the track bug for sure, and I truly enjoy improving, but right now, I am still so far behind you guys! I love Tasker's Fisher Price school, line. That's me!!

 

I'd be happy at this point to:

 

A) Put all the Code skills together, at least in ONE corner! Right now, I am still talking myself through the steps, and most of the time, I am focusing on one thing or another, and have a difficult time getting it all to "click" at the same time. I'll have a lap that I do pretty good body position on, but I'll totally blow shifting/braking. Or, if I concentrate on visual skills, my body position tends to go to hell (they kind of fight with one another...if you are way down on the bike, it's darn hard to see!)

 

B) Keep improving the body position. I took great strides at Pahrump; not sure if that was the change to the Fizzer, or if something just clicked, but it got much better. I'm on my way to getting that knee down! I just hope I don't fall off after it happens from my sheer joy! grin.gif

 

C) Next time I do Code level 4, I have to get on the slide bike. Russell has no issues with sliding now, but it would scare the crap out of me. I was too chicken for the slide bike in my first level 4 class (and perhaps not even ready for it), but I want to try it.

 

D) I have to focus more when I'm out on the track. The funniest, stupidest thoughts run through my head out there! I'm usually talking to myself like an instructor "OK, now brake...now hip flick, kiss the mirrors, quick flick...now on the throttle etc." but sometimes I'll have music in my head, or think about "what if my family was watching me right now, man they'd hate this lean angle I'm doing right now..." etc. Too many distractions, not enough focus on the game.

 

E) Keep working out. I'm exercising like a mad woman now. This may have helped me get the body position better at the last track day. I still have a ways to go, I just need to keep at it. I was actually to the point where I was doing squats, lunges, outer and inner thigh exercises with leathers on, just for the added weight, and to get more comfortable in the leathers. My Stitch never felt lighter than when I put it on after wearing leathers!

 

Anyway, good job on your progress! I'm jealous! I'm to the place where I like track riding more than street riding. Like you, I like going slow and leisurely on the street now, and just "cruisin'". I'm to where I want to spend more (time/money) on the track stuff, and less on the street bike.

 

Ima gonna have to talk Phil into coming down to one of our track days and showing me what my FZR can do!! smile.gif

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Lisa, here's where I think you'll experience a breakthrough: several tracks days in close proximity on the calendar. Until I started doing more of them, more frequently, I kept losing too much between them. It was like learning to fly and taking one lesson a month--there's too much remembering before you can build the next layer.

 

Hang in there! smile.gif

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Firefight911
Lisa, here's where I think you'll experience a breakthrough: several tracks days in close proximity on the calendar. Until I started doing more of them, more frequently, I kept losing too much between them. It was like learning to fly and taking one lesson a month--there's too much remembering before you can build the next layer.

 

Hang in there! smile.gif

 

Abolutely agree here! Immersion is definitely an advantage when it comes to stringing the track sessions together into a seamless flow of learning.

 

Like Nicky said in his post race interview, he gets up real early in the morning and goes to work.

 

Stay at it, don't get discouraged, and just have fun. Take a few laps and concentrate with everything you have and then just let it go and cruise around a bit. Take a look off to the side and find some RP's. Think about George Michael when he was in the group Wham! You could even get jiggy wit it in the privacy of your own helmet and leathers while singing at the top of your lungs. grin.gif

 

Ima gonna have to talk Phil into coming down to one of our track days and showing me what my FZR can do!!

 

grin.gifgrin.gifgrin.gif

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russell_bynum

here's where I think you'll experience a breakthrough: several tracks days in close proximity on the calendar.

 

We're doing a day at Buttonwillow followed by two days at Reno with just a week in between. cool.gif

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We're doing a day at Buttonwillow followed by two days at Reno with just a week in between.

 

And then just one more week and I'm at Femmoto. If Code needed corner workers, then we could get in some time at the end of October at Willow, but the roster is full, unfortunately. frown.gif

 

Agreed though, I think going more often would help. It does get a touch pricey when BOTH Russell and I are addicted to it though! cool.gifeek.gif

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