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Euro Switch Help?


Woodie

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My RTP has a euro-switch, but it doesn't control the lights. I'm adding additional lights, so I want to re-connect the euro-switch, back to it's OEM setup.

 

But...I can't figure out where exactly to look, nor what it should look like!

I've taken off the dash, and traced the wire bundle coming from the switch, but lost it somewhere, I think on the upper right, under the outer front fairing.

 

I'm guessing I'm going to need to remove the front fairing as well, but I'm not sure. Guidance? Pictures? I have the wiring diagram (courtesy of Clymer), but that doesn't help w/ the physical connections.

 

While I'm at it, I'd like to plug in the hazard switch. Any ideas where that plugs in?

 

TIA,

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My RTP has a euro-switch, but it doesn't control the lights. I'm adding additional lights, so I want to re-connect the euro-switch, back to it's OEM setup.

 

But...I can't figure out where exactly to look, nor what it should look like!

I've taken off the dash, and traced the wire bundle coming from the switch, but lost it somewhere, I think on the upper right, under the outer front fairing.

 

I'm guessing I'm going to need to remove the front fairing as well, but I'm not sure. Guidance? Pictures? I have the wiring diagram (courtesy of Clymer), but that doesn't help w/ the physical connections.

 

While I'm at it, I'd like to plug in the hazard switch. Any ideas where that plugs in?

 

TIA,

 

Not sure if this helps or gets at your issue, but...

 

The hazards on ex CHP bikes (and perhaps other authorities as well) are wired through the secondary battery.

 

If you've removed the secondary battery you've broken the circuit. In my experience, the hazards will work even with a dead battery (so long as the engine is on which obviously is not optimal but shows the link of the circuit).

 

You may at least be able to isolate the feeds and work to bridge the circuit if you want to run without the secondary battery.

 

Same holds true for the switch controlling the front & rear strobes (your euro-switch?).

 

Sorry if you knew all that but thought I'd put it out there as a first step smile.gif

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I found the terminus to mine, cable tied to the fairing bracket near the right side of the headlight housing. I'm using it in position 1 to switch a relay that powers my fog lights. I may add some flashing lights to position 2 next winter. This is assuming that we call 0 the "off" position. Anthing that you wire to position 1 will remain on in addition to whatever you wire to position 2.

 

I found mine when I had the front fairing off and used an ohm meter to trace it out. Evidently it had been used for police side strobes or pole light that were removed from the bike prior to auction. be sure to check out the wiring diagrams at www.bmwmc.net

 

I've really enjoyed my RT-P. It's a little differnt from the CHP models as it was made to spec for Wahington State Patrol. Hope you like yours.

 

Regards, Larry

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Thanks guys!

 

Based on some more searching, it appears that...

The socket for the euroswitch is under the tank. frown.gif

The plug is more than likely to the right of the headlight. Thanks!

 

Hazards:

I do not have a second battery installed, but I will do that, since I have a "spare" anyway. Thanks!

Where is the flasher unit for the hazards? Maybe I can trace backwards from there?

 

I don't actually have the hazard switch, but the doc says that you can turn them on by pressing both turn signals at the same time. Does that really work? I guess I'll test once the second battery is in.

 

The electrics on this thing are starting to drive me nuts! I found the right speaker wire was left in place, and cut/capped half-way up the right bar. The left speaker didn't have a wire. The lights run through the fog-light switch, and I'm guessing that it's running the full lights through there, rather than a relay. I suspect a relay (or two) is in my future. smile.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

Update:

I found the euro-switch leads. They had split the light control wires away from the main bundle just at the point where it plugs in to the wiring harness. (This was just to the right of the headlight, up under the dash.) Some snipping, some soldering, and it's back to the OEM setup. smile.gif

 

I did connect a second battery, which powered up the front powerlet socket. smile.gif However, still no hazard flashers. Any ideas what the plug for the hazard swithc looks like? (# connects, shape, wire-colors?)

 

I did find the OEM powerlet wires, wire-wrapped out of the way, so I'm switching the socket back to the main battery.

 

I've installed a couple of relays now, to run the auxiliary lights. Still not complete, as I'm trying to find a hot lead from the extra circuits in the authority fuse box. Any ideas how to get to the wires under the fuse holders, and trace them from there out? (I'd like to use the stock fuse-holder if I can, for a cleaner install). Yes, I know I can run one lead from the battery directly, but I'm trying to avoid running *any* leads for the moment.

 

Maybe I have to remove the gas tank? (How hard is that?)

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Woodie,

 

From recollection the hazard plug/socket is 3 wires and one of them is brown. I disconnected my hazard switch during troubleshooting of a Kisan Signalminder (at first they thought that the issues I was having were due to a grounding of wiring in the hazard light circuit, but later we found it to be a bad Signalminder unit). As I recall the switch unplugged in an area just to the right (as you are sitting on the bike) front of the fuel tank, Once I disconnected this connector I have never been able to find it again.

 

Don't know about pressing both TS switches to get hazards unless you have a Signalminder in place of your normal TS/Hazard relay.

 

In my discussions with Kisan I learned that turning on the hazards on an R11xxRT was simply a matter of momentarily grounding one of the pins on the TS/Hazard relay (sorry, I don't remember off hand which one). I believe that I still have my (removed) hazard light switch, so I'll try to take a pic of the connector end of it tonight.

 

Remember also that you might be able to relieve yourself of lots of this hassle by installing a Kisan Signalminder. Provides you with timed auto-cancellation of the turn signals, allows you to use your TS's as running lights, and also provides 4-way flasher capabilities (press and hold both TS switches). Probably the feature I like best is that you can press the TS button on the side which is flashing to cancel that TS: Much easier than pressing up on the cancel button. Model you would need for your RT-P is an SM-5, and they run around $100.

 

I've got some RT-P wiring diagrams at home, so I'll try to pull them up tonight and see if I get them to you. Why don't you PM me with an email address where I can send some JPG or PDF files directly to you.

 

Regarding your aux lights, I ran mine directly off the aux battery. It is a "new run", but it also is a short one. Plus I don't drain my main battery when I run my AUX lights. Just something to think about.

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Thanks. At least now I have something to look for. (Yes, there are MANY connectors in there!)

 

I thought about the signal minder, but at $100 vs $15+sweat for OEM, I'm still leaning towards OEM.

 

For the short-term, the second battery is a good idea. That will get me through the rest of the year. cool.gif I am hoping to remove the second battery entirely, since I really don't have anything to run off the second battery.

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For the short-term, the second battery is a good idea. That will get me through the rest of the year. cool.gif I am hoping to remove the second battery entirely, since I really don't have anything to run off the second battery.

Then again, with both batteries in place and an appropriate cable, the RT-P's are the only bikes which can jumpstart themselves!

 

T

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Self-jumping! cool.gif

 

I found all my connectors, including the hazard lights. (Wiretied out of the way, way under the left front panel). For the rest of you trying to figure out the wiring, best advice is to remove the side panels, the dash, and the front fairing. Then you can see the wiring, trace them, and generally be able to work with them.

 

Pics available by request. wave.gif

 

Thanks for all your help! thumbsup.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

I now have pics!

 

This first shot shows the right front corner, with the original CHP wiring pulled out so you can see it. The yellowish highlight is the socket for connecting the euroswitch bundle to the wiring harness. I've unmounted it from the fram, and pulled out the plug. The pinkish highlight is the plug, showing the switch wires from both the left and right bars, cross-wired so the aux switch controls all the lights w/ a single throw.

Originaleurowiring.jpg

 

This is the "after" picture, just before I button up the bike again. The yellow highlight again shows the socket, but now it's mounted, and the plug from the right bars is installed, and so not seen. The pinkish area shows the new relays (one for driving, one for fog) which are controlled by two aux switches (one each side), and pull their trigger power from either the high beams (driving lights) or the parking lights (fog lights).

Eurowiring--after.jpg

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I am curious on the second battery. Is that something that can go into a regular R1150RT? If so, is it easier to run wiring and switches for aux lighting and gadets from the second battery?

 

Michael

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By default, the second battery takes up the glove box. I seem to recall that the 1150s have a somewhat different box design, but as long as the battery will physically fit, installation shouldn't be a problem. Presumably you could also get an RTP glovebox. But assuming you're past that point, it's no easier or harder, in my opinion to wire things up to run off the secondary battery v.s. the primary.

 

The reason LEOs do it is so that you can run equipment until the battery dies without disabling the bike. One battery for ignition and such and the other for hazards, spot lights, etc. which may need to run off battery power for a very long time.

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It's actually harder. Now you have to figure out how to wire the #2 battery in, so that it charges when the bike is on, but yet is disconnected when the ignition is off. Throw in the lack of a fuse panel, and it's becoming more and more difficult.

 

My goal is to eliminate the #2 battery, since there's nothing that can't be run off the primary battery. For me, it's a convenience, since I happen to have a mostly dead battery that will fit there, and the items I'm running off it are only in use when the engine is running anyway.

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Good point. It's definitely work to install the second battery so that the alternator charges it.

 

What I meant to say was that once it's in, being able to use it instead of the primary battery isn't that much of an advantage. Like you, I never found a need for the second battery. Having the glovebox empty was a much bigger win.

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Sorry to extend this thread…

 

I too have a R1100RTP and I would like to use the Euro Switch for my headlight and then use the extra switch on my left handlebar (police headlight switch) for the soon to be installed fog lights.

 

So, I've read this thread and I guess I'm a little confused.

 

I know Woodie added driving lights and had the euro switch turn those on as well. I’m not sure what was up with his hazard switch. Mine seems to work fine without a second battery. I guess A&S Motorsports removed the 2nd battery and made those switches work when they converted the bike back to civilian model. They also removed the radio box and put the passenger seat in. Perhaps I should call them to see what they know…

 

If I just wanted to have the Euro switch work as it was intended (parking lights & headlights), is it a matter of:

1. Locating where the Euro switch connector was tied off,

2. Disconnecting the police switch connector

3. Then plugging in the connector for the Euro switch to the headlight?

 

Am I missing something or is there a “gotcha” to this conversion?

 

p.s. Thanks Woodie for posting the photos…

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The gotcha for the euroswitch (once you've found the g-d connectors!) is that I had to cut the wiring from the switch, and resolder it back to the original wiring. (see the purple highlight in my 1st picture) This is the additional connector that was added to make the regular lights only switch through the aux switch on the left. Other than that, you've got the procedure.

 

Just to be clear for others...the aux switch on the left bar controls my fog lights. Not through direct flow, but through a relay. I used the parking light "hot" for the trigger circuit, thus minimizin current through the switch (which can't handle very much) and maximizing current through the lights. This way I can't turn on the fogs unless the parking lights are on. (It didn't matter to me if the high- vs. low- beam was on)

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Hey Woodie

 

I decided that seeing as I had to take the front fairing off to swap my headlight (being a CHP bike it dips the wrong way for New Zealand roads) I might as well reconnect the euroswitch and gain another AUX switch.

 

You're pics and instructions are great by the way smile.gif (BMW should employ you to do their workshop manuals...then they might actually be of some real help!)

 

I see from the first pic the euro connector and the AUX connector, can you tell me exactly what wires you had to re-solder and where you had to reconnect them to?? It looks like the aux wires are a blue, green & yellow so where do they go?

 

Appreciate your assistance on this. It will be good to get this extra switch back PLUS I'll be using what is essentially a brand new euro switch smile.gif

 

FYI: when I plugged a switch into the hazard socket they worked straight away and I don't have a second battery... must have been the dealer put this all back in place when they took out the battery.

Thanks

Tracy

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I'm going to assume a few things here:

1. You have a manual w/ the wiring diagram in it.

2. You have the whole nose off, so you can get to the socket where the euro-switch bundle connects to the wiring harness.

3. You have and know how to use a short-circuit detector. (the little light on a probe doohickey).

 

Overview:

The OEM wires come from the switch as as single bundle, and all the wires connect through the socket to the wiring harness.

On MY ex-CHP bike, the wires from the switch came as a single bundle, but then 3 wires were split off to a seperate connector, wich connected to an aux switch, and then finally back to the OEM connector.

 

What I did was cut off this secondary connector, and then reconnect the switch bundle back to the original socket. The colors in the Clymer manual I have are match what I found. I cut, then soldered back to match the wire colors, and to match the arrangement in the diagram.

 

So, white/yellow (from the OEM switch) connects to white/yellow (on the socket side) and green goes to green, etc.. Ignore the colors on the aux switch, they don't match the diagram, and aren't in the diagram (of course).

 

Keep in mind that two of the wires are connected on the switch side of the plug.

 

What I did (and I don't think you have to) is create some jumper wires, run them from a known hot, and probe the suspected connections on the wiring harness. That way I KNEW for sure what that particular wire was! (highs/lows/parking)

 

So, in the first picture, the purple highlight. There's a yellow wire going from the OEM to the AUX switch. Cut that, and reconnect the OEM switch side of it to the yellow wire coming out of the OEM plug side.

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thanks Woodie smile.gif That's really helpful and saves me probin around all day with a DVM.

 

Thanks again for all the help

 

God Bless

Tracy

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