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1200 RT low rpm pinging


New1200RTRider

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New1200RTRider

I have a 2005 1200 RT and a friend has one also.

Around 2500 RPM to around 3500 RPM mine makes a mild

rattling sound and my friends doesn't. We are both running

the same brand of gasoline and 91 octaine fuel. Does anyone else experience this?

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I use 93 octane in the midwest. I am wondering if anyone else on the west coast has had a pinging problem? You may want to try different brand of gas, but I don't remember anyone mentioning pinging on the R12's on this sight. Have you called your dealer?

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New1200RTRider

it's not so much pinging, just kind of a rattling sound when the engine is under load at low rpm. I use Chevron 91 octane. I haven't contacted the dealer because it isn't a big deal was just wondering if others might experience this.

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It's possible that what you are hearing is not ping. My guess is that a cam chain tensioner is not generating enough pressure on the tensioner blade to keep it from rattling at the RPMs that you are noticing the symptom. It is a hydraulic type adjuster, using oil pressure to hold the slack side of the chain taut. I have heard that later RT12s have a different tensioner body / orifice. Mine is an early '05, and rattles some at lower RPMs.

If you are still on break-in, you are likely running 10-40 oil. 20-50 will help. A little more RPMs will help. too.

I could be wrong, too. Check it out.

Paul in CA

'05 R1200RT

'98 XR400R

Other vintage

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New1200RTRider

that makes sense but it seems to make a rattle sound when the engine is under load at low RPM, if it is just idling or you rev it a bit, there is no rattle. It has always done this even when it had 3 miles on the clock. I have 2700 miles now.

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Mine rattled quite a bit up to and just over the initial 1000 km service. I now have about 6000 kms on the clock and have noticed that low rpm load conditions are way smoother now.. i'm assuming that things settle down as we get through beak-in.

 

BUT, my 5k rpm and up range is still quite rough.

 

I have had a few good 8-12 hour days running at over 4k rpm steady. As per alot of suggestions i have had, i'm flogging her...

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ShovelStrokeEd

4 to 5K is not flogging, it is a leisurly pace for the motor. Rather than run 8-12 hours at a steady RPM vary your revs and the load on the motor by changing throttle position. Accelerate, then coast back down. That is what will most quickly bring things into a proper worn in state.

 

A don't recall what the original poster considers low RPM, I think he was talking about mid 2K stuff. That is way low in my opinion. I try never to run below 3K with 4K to 5K being more the norm. If riding in twisties and getting a bit "sporty" it is more in the 6K to redline range.

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4 to 5K is not flogging, it is a leisurly pace for the motor. Rather than run 8-12 hours at a steady RPM vary your revs and the load on the motor by changing throttle position. Accelerate, then coast back down. That is what will most quickly bring things into a proper worn in state.

 

A don't recall what the original poster considers low RPM, I think he was talking about mid 2K stuff. That is way low in my opinion. I try never to run below 3K with 4K to 5K being more the norm. If riding in twisties and getting a bit "sporty" it is more in the 6K to redline range.

 

Ditto what Ed said. You're lugging your engine at revs this low. I seldom run below 4000 rpm and never twist the throttle below 3000 and seldom at 3000. You need to downshift and get some revs going in that engine.

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I'm in N. Cal and the usual "premium" gas is 91 octane. My '05 R12RT exhibits the same rattling sound, under heavy load and low to moderate RPMs. I've found a local Unocal station that sells 100 octane and have been blending 1.5 gal of that grade (assuming the tank holds about 7 gallons total), with 91 octane to obtain a minimum of 93. When I do that, the rattling is resolved. I recall reading that blending gasoline grades can be done to increase octane. Just remember to fill with the higher octane gas first - I can't reclall the reason, but it made sense at the time.

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This engine has a 12:1 compression ratio it is designed for 98-100 octane fuel. It has knock sensors but there is only so much they can do if you use 91. Don't be cheap you have a great machine it costs no extra to use high octane fuel as your gas mileage is much better.

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marcls,

 

Save yourself some hassle and pick up a can of Octane boost.

One pump stop and you are done. I run Shell or Chevron premium and have no problems. Both are "Top Tier" blends.

Top Tier

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marcls,

 

Save yourself some hassle and pick up a can of Octane boost.

One pump stop and you are done. I run Shell or Chevron premium and have no problems. Both are "Top Tier" blends.

Top Tier

 

I used to add a can of octane boost to my Porsche, which also likes 93 to 96 octane gas. But, when the Unocal station I mentioned in my earlier post started to sell 100 octane gas from one of their pumps, I switched to the "gas blending" approach.

 

You make a good point, however: 100 octane costs $4.89/gal, so I should figure out if the 1.5 gallons per tank of 100 octane I use to get 93 octane is more or less expensive than the cost of a can of octane boost.

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Why are you lugging the engine at 2000 RPM and heavy load.

A deisel tractor will rattle under low RPM and heavy load.

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The fuel specification for Australian specification R1200RT's is 98 octane fuel. 95 octane is supposedly acceptable with a loss in power. I wouldn't be surprised to get some knocking with anything less than the 95 octane. For the few cents per litre price difference it is not worth the hassle of doing some engine damage.

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