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Retired? What are you up to?


Mike

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I retired…or at least I thought I did…four years ago. A few months ago, my daughter-in-law referred to me as “the busiest retired person she’s ever seen.” 🤣 Truthfully, sometimes I feel so danged tired that I can barely place one foot in front of the other, but I’ve been doing my best to keep forging ahead. 

My life? Well, we have a place in Wisconsin that we built a few years ago, and when the pandemic brought widespread shutdowns to the Chicago area we decamped to the cabin. With just a little under 20 acres, much of it forested, there’s enough to keep me fairly busy. And then there’s my wife, who, after retiring from a significant corporate position with one of the largest travel firms in the Americas, decided she wanted to strike out on her own. 

The business is pretty crazy busy, and somehow I got hornswaggled into being the go-fer, accountant, general counsel, and webmaster. Truthfully, it’s more than I’d envisioned doing at this point in life, but it does keep the brain cells activated. This is our blog (and God, no…I’m not trying to sell you anything): https://www.elantravel.net/blog. In spite of the chaos surrounding us, we’ve been able to travel quite a bit over the past few months: Utah, California, Mexico’s Riviera Nayarit, Rwanda (wifey only); and we have quite a bit on the agenda over the months to come. If Europe doesn’t close down again, we’re heading to Tuscany in September. After that, in 2022, Antarctica and South Africa are on the schedule. In 2023, the Arctic.

Riding is still part of the program. Hopefully the next year will see a few serious miles on the new GSA. 

How about you? I’m always fascinated by how people spend their “golden years,” and the group here is pretty active and diverse in its interests.

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Hello Mike.  Thanks for the topic.  My situation is much like yours.

 

I "retired" about 5 years ago, but continue to support and do new installs of software I sold to several oil-production facilities on the North Slope of Alaska.

 

I've lived in Alaska over 35 years, but still visit family in GA a couple times a year.  Also throw in camping and motorcycle rides whenever possible.  My RT and RV are stored in NM, and I use that as a base for adventures.  I'm also "finishing" a house I've been building near Big Lake, AK for many years.  It's mostly done, so doing mostly finish work now.  And I have a remote cabin in the Alaska wilderness that I get to by snowmachine or boat when possible -- and do "finish" work on it.

 

My wife, Lisa, retired a year before me, and she's at least as busy as me.  We do adventures together, and have pet goats we walk around the neighborhood and share with the kids.  And since it's the only state I haven't been to, Lisa plans to take me to Hawaii sometime in the next year.

 

... Gotta get back to the finish work now ...

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I retired 2.5 years ago.  I wish I had done it sooner.  Busy all the time...not sure doing what, but doing it at my pace....or not.  I have always wanted to fish more.  I now fish a lot.  Piddle with the boat a lot.  Always something to do on it to make it better.  I was asked to join two boards for tech start ups.  I did.  After serving about 18 months on each, I decided it was more than I wanted to do and have now ended both of those appointments.

The beach house always needs something.  Rebuilt 1st and 2nd floor decks.  Did some sheetrock repair.  Drank some beer, drank some Buffalo Trace.

 

The one thing I didn't do that I thought I would do a lot...is ride my motorcycle.  I've barely ridden it the last two years, partially covid, and partially just didn't have the desire.  I'm planning and hoping to make FART next month....weather dependent as it is over 2200 miles round trip.  I can take a shower but won't do 2200 in storms.

 

Started exercising a lot more.  Lost 40lbs.  Blew out knee.  Had knee surgery.  Got it fixed.

 

So where do the days go...dunno...but all of a sudden the days are over.

 

 

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Wow, reading all this just confirms we don’t have to become that nasty old bastard at the end of the street… (c’mon we all had one:grin: 

 

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Old Mr. Foster was ours! :eek: :grin:

 

I've been doing some pretty good retirement stuff for quite some time now. I figure it this way, I’ll of gotten my monies worth even before retirement begins! :thumbsup: :rofl: 
 

 

 

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Retired 13 years ago and much of the focus has been the grandkids (now 11 and 13). Can’t imagine a much more important legacy and hopefully something they will pay forward.  Unfortunately some of our energies have been devoted to assisting our grown son manage his significant health challenges but just grateful we’ve been in a position to do that.  And of course motorcycles (Alaska ride being the highlight with recent trip to the MOA Rally in MT being pretty good as well) and drag cars being the focus of my free time. My wife and I have enjoyed some extensive RV travels which have yielded an impressive array of Jr. Ranger badges for the grandkids and memories beyond measure….more of those in store as long as we can do it. 
 

We are blessed beyond words.

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16 minutes ago, TEWKS said:

Wow, reading all this just confirms we don’t have to become that nasty old bastard at the end of the street… (c’mon we all had one:grin: 

 

get-off-my-lawn-clint-eastwood.gif
 

Old Mr. Foster was ours! :eek: :grin:

 

I've been doing some pretty good retirement stuff for quite some time now. I figure it this way, I’ll of gotten my monies worth even before retirement begins! :thumbsup: :rofl: 
 

 

 

I am trying to work on my cranky side…hopefully it’ll increase in the years to come. You’re doing it right, and my focus is on living life as fully and generously as I can, whether I have a few more years or kick off overnight. I had some (minor) surgery a couple of weeks ago, and did the responsible thing, making sure my wife and son knew where to find my advanced directive, will, etc. As one ages, you can’t help but notice that life can take completely unexpected turns…and that no one among us is guaranteed tomorrow.

I know that’s a bit morbid sounding, but I try to approach it positively, squeezing a wee bit of pleasure out of life whenever I can. I’m hoping that I stay on the sunny side of the statistics for a long time. 🥳

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I know the feeling.  I am within 5 years of retiring.  I am also interested in this topic so as to learn all  can.  If you know what I mean.  And I think you do.   Until then, I can live vicariously via this world wide web connection.  

 

Thanks for posting and keep 'em coming.

 

I used to tell my retired dad  "Happy Friday!"  and his response was 'Huh?  What day is it again?"  Ah, yes.   Good times!

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One other thing Mike made me think of that I thought was important.  We have had a will for years that gives each other power of attorney for medial and financial.  What we didn't have was a will that said what if we both get hit by the same train.  We don't have children so it took some real thinking on what to do.  Get your will done.  We now have ours updated in case we both go at the same time.  I can tell you that is not an easy conversation to have...which nephew, which brother, etc.  Some in...Some not.  Unless something catastrophic happens we will have a few pennies left when we are both gone.  Life is really good in retirement.

 

Things to do at least 12 months and maybe 18 months before you retire.  Research the heck out of (depending on what you have) any retirement benefits you might have from your company, open market medical if you aren't 65 and ready for medicare, medicare isn't simple so plan at least 3 months ahead of eligibility, and if you plan to finance or refinance anything do it before your retire.  We are fortunate in the house and everything we own is paid for.  Not so with a good friend who has tons of money.  He decided to buy a 3rd home and finance it.  He wasn't able to show enough income even though he has at least $10M in cash.  He ended up having to pay cash.  Insurance on the open market is very expensive.  Just for the 2 of us it was around $1700 month for basic med...no vision, no dental.  We shopped like crazy.  Not a political statement....Obamacare which I thought would be good, was the most expensive by a lot...almost double.

 

The biggest freedom for me was no calendar.  My work calendar was booked solid at least 10 hours a day with meetings....many on the weekends.  Now....basically notta unless I want it.  No alarm clock..although I still go to bed about midnight and wake up between 500 and 6.  Can''t seem to break that habit.

 

Get retired as soon as you can.  You will not regret it.  I promise.

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Great advice David, if you’re not financially prepared to retire don’t.  Have relatives and friends that didn’t think ahead unfortunately and it’s sobering to see people with retirement dreams they simply can’t fund. My wife and I are having serious discussions about who in our families warrant consideration in our estate planning (not that it will be huge but probably enough to create family friction and frankly we almost resent being put in that position). But if you can, do it as soon as possible, this country and the entire world is waiting for your personal exploration.  Getting up out of your own bed on your own terms and watching the sun rise while drinking coffee isn’t bad either. 

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26 minutes ago, mickeym3 said:

Great advice David, if you’re not financially prepared to retire don’t.  Have relatives and friends that didn’t think ahead unfortunately and it’s sobering to see people with retirement dreams they simply can’t fund. My wife and I are having serious discussions about who in our families warrant consideration in our estate planning (not that it will be huge but probably enough to create family friction and frankly we almost resent being put in that position). But if you can, do it as soon as possible, this country and the entire world is waiting for your personal exploration.  Getting up out of your own bed on your own terms and watching the sun rise while drinking coffee isn’t bad either. 

 

When we knew we were moving from Japan back to the states, we started planning my retirement from the Corps (I knew I wouldn't stay more than 2-3 years after returning).  We budgeted on an expected Gunnery Sergeant/E7's retire pay, so we shopped for a house that would be covered by that pay.  Not only did we budget the house, but we through in household expenses/living expenses for a family of four.  We did it this way with the worse possible outcome in that if my wife did not get a job and I didn't get a job after I retired.  If those two situations occurred, we knew, at the minimum, our family would be covered.  We wouldn't have toys to play with nor would we have any fun money, but we could at least live our day to day lives and not rely on any additional outside assistance.

 

So, what happened was she got a job teaching and I got a pretty good gig for the area.  I tell many folks at work that "I don't need this job", if they piss me off.  The wife's teacher friends tell their co-workers/AP/principal to "not piss Theresa off 'cause she doesn't need this job".  If we were both to lose our jobs today, we'd be ok fo sho as we'd sell off anything with a note (her truck, my tractor and GSA) and all we'd have left is the house to pay.   So, my plan now with the second career is to go until the house is paid off our 60, whichever comes first, but kinda looks like they may hit 'bout the same time.

 

Live within your means, plan and stockpile for hardships and prepare for the inevitable day that will come where you will no longer work.

 

 

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I got an early retirement at 60.  Moved from Illinois to Iowa, rode to Alaska, built a garage, got a CDL, and took a part time job driving a truck in the first 6 months.  I enjoy the truck almost as much as the bike in 4 years of driving.  Even get to combine them.

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2 hours ago, Skywagon said:

The biggest freedom for me was no calendar. 

 

2 hours ago, Skywagon said:

 

Get retired as soon as you can.  You will not regret it.  I promise.

This. Obviously some of us find ourselves in a better position to do it, but my appointment scheduling tends to be pretty loose, and it’s hugely liberating not to be tied to someone else’s demands. Except SWMBO, of course. 🤣

But David’s advice about being financially and legally prepared is also very important. The latter isn’t all that difficult, but it requires some deliberate thought. 

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9 hours ago, TEDZ said:

I got an early retirement at 60.  Moved from Illinois to Iowa, rode to Alaska, built a garage, got a CDL, and took a part time job driving a truck in the first 6 months.  I enjoy the truck almost as much as the bike in 4 years of driving.  Even get to combine them.

20210522_075248.jpg

 

LoL.

 

For my job, sometimes I have to personally deliver equipment.  This one time, I had to go to Maryland to drop off some large stuff.  I placed my bike in the 26ft Penske truck, drove to the delivery location, they forklifted the equipment out and saw a bike.  They asked where that was being delivered, I told them it was my way home.  I then head to Home Depot to drop the truck off, roll up the door, pull out the ramp, ride the RT down and two employees said something to the effect of "that's how you drop off a truck singlehandedly".

 

Anyway, four years later, I still get comments about trucking my bike on deliveries.

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I've been asked many times in the last couple months when I'm going to retire. What the hell, I'm not that old!

I mean I look that old, I'm just not that old.

Longevity does not run in my family, so I didn't really set up properly to actually retire, luckily a union job was looking out for me. Probably 7 or 8 years out from retirement, unless the lotto finally hits, then hookers and blow until the end!

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Hmmm let's see. Power wash driveway, pick up some branches from wind storm, practice pitching and chipping, go to Lake Michigan with wife, daughter and her friend, eat in a good restaurant in South Haven, watch the sunset on the beach, take my evening medication, smoke a cigar in the garage. And that's a wrap on today.

 

Life is a lot simpler these days. I retired a year ago June and the one thing I am still getting used to is not having the pressure of needing to do something, be somewhere, finish a report, make a call, go to a meeting. I could just screw around without penalty.

 

And I work out everyday so I can continue an active lifestyle. Somedays I don't feel like it but I push through that. I never regret a workout when it's done. And 7500 steps a day minimum ... religiously. This and watching calories netted an 80 pound weight loss in three years which is the average weight of a 10-11 year old boy.

 

Take good care and ride safe,

 

MB

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I was fortunate enough to retire early  59. First couple of years I was the ultimate gluten. Ate and drank way to much. Or at least that is what the extra 30 lbs is telling me. Now I’m paying for that as I am trying to loose it in order to fit in my stitch gear for FART. Started working again, if that’s what you want to call it , a few days a week on the local ferry taking people out to the Cape. I’ll not be joining Bezos for a space run , but all has worked out well for me. Oh Well, back to my new office

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I'm right at that age now too where I need to take retirement seriously. I see myself as still needing to do some sort of job 20-25 hrs a week so I'll stay employed at the shop I own watching over the finances and help my son.

Interesting topic listening to those that are at the threshold  and those that are 5 and 10 years into retirement.

 

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Why do people not retire who can afford to? Lots of reasons I'm sure. Human behavior is complex. As I look around at my friends and folks I know, some of what I see is:

 

Some do not have strong interests outside of work.

Some don't want to be home too much.

The work addiction is just too strong.

They fear losing their identity, status, standing, importance, power.

 

Of course some continue to be passionate or interested in their work. Not a thing wrong with that.

 

 

 

 

 

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My wife worked as a clerk for the county. She didn't mind her job, but didn't much care for most of her coworkers, and had absolutely no respect for her superiors. As her retirement drew near, she said she wanted to work a few months longer, I think she thought it would help her pension. I asked her why, she hates her coworkers and especially her immediate manager, and working a few months longer would bring in an extra 8 cents a month.

She retired one week after her birthday, and has not looked back. She thanks me often for talking her out of staying any longer.

The first day she didn't have to go in, it was like she'd already been retired for years, she knew exactly what to do. Nothing! She loves it, keeps busy when she wants, relaxes when she wants.

Now she just day drinks and watches soaps. ( Not true, of course. She hates it when I tell people that!)

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Mike asked "Retired? What are you up to?", a well delivered interrogatory that cuts to the heart of the matter.  Like anyone, I have many interests, but none of them have developed into a true passion so that I KNOW what I will be doing when I retire, which I plan to be less than four years from now in 2025 when I am 62.    My wife is 6 years younger and will be the sole bread earner for a while (heh, heh, my evil plan is coming together).  We've run the FIRE retirement calculators and believe we will be ok as long as no unplanned-for event with a nasty price tag strikes us down. She has often said, "You can go ride that motorcycle of yours wherever you want, as long as there is healthy food in the fridge for me for when you are gone."  That's a deal.

 

Too many times in the last 20 years where work has (perhaps rightfully) taken precedence over making a FART, START, or UnRally. So, yes, I plan to ride to Mt. Gleno.  I want to see Paul Mihalka's favorite vista in the Appalachians, and I want to ride that Colorado route that Fernando sketched out for me a few years ago.  I want to ride to see family in Michigan, Ohio, Maryland, and Maine.  I don't know anyone in Nebraska anymore, but I am riding to M's Pub in Old Market and getting some Lahvosh for my belly.  Just try to stop me.  I am so looking forward to not having a mandatory return date.

 

Through my employment, I know many ultra high net worth people who's day is completely full of obligations.  The richest people in the world, names you know and read about every day.  Holy crapoly do they have a lot going on.  They are wired differently than me.  No amount of money for them is enough.  They are completely driven to attain more, control more, and influence more.  No thanks.  After evaluating the price that must be paid, the talent required and work that must be done, I want no part of that.  There is just no air in it.  You can be on your yacht in the Bahamas with your well-armed crew surrounding you while you fish for a marlin, but I will find much more satisfaction watching the sunset from a dusty camping overlook with no one within 100 miles of me, creating a lovely fire from local scrap because I know how to do it.  I will not envy you.  

 

So, what are you up to?  Did you complete that woodshop?  Grow a garden? Become a coach for your grandson's baseball league?  Show your granddaughter how to punch someone in the throat?  Learn to play that guitar that has been sitting in the corner?   Planning to do the Great Loop?  How about riding your moto somewhere far, far away and meeting a new life-long friend halfway across the world?

 

I am open to ideas.  I figure I will have at least a 10-year post retirement window to embrace active pursuits before having to worry about falling down and breaking bones.

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On 8/11/2021 at 1:04 PM, Mike said:

How about you?

 

Worked until 66 to get full invest (at the time) on SS and also cobble up a few more pennies in the retirement fund ....did a fair amount of riding... HELenBack (an unusual foray for me outside of the Western US) , regular at Torrey  , DVD and the former Temecula Days .... enjoyed lots of time just not having any plan for that day ... did two fabulous UnRallys that I normally wouldn't have been able to attend . 

 

Then, discovered the modular AR platform and the thousands of parts available to build it into most anything you desire .... which became an interesting an ongoing hobby building and target shooting the results.

 

Then about 2 years ago ... my arm was twisted ( gently ;) ) to help bring BMWST up from  80's technology into something with more modern features like better mobile use , picture handling and in general make it something that's both visually and functionally more user friendly.  And here we are .... still at it. 

 

Age is catching up to LD riding, we've trailered to a couple of Torrey events .... BUT ....  planning and looking forward to  actually  riding to  Fall Torrey. 

 

The good thing is  years don't hamper wrangling a keyboard as much :cool:.

 

 

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I'm hoping to answer the "what are you doing" more fully fairly soon. Covid stymied travel and then I had family health crisis 2,000 miles west that I attended to for several months. Fortunate that I was able to deal with that time away without any kind of work penalty. However, I've got a few things on the list. Isle of Man race, one of those Viking southern France cruises with my wife, planning 3-4 months in the winter in Florida or Arizona, my first bun Saddlesore 1000 next month, more golf and kayaking ... so nothing too earth shattering. My financial planner said that a lot of retirees have big ideas the first year or so about doing really cool, far out, expensive things, but ultimately we are what we are, wired a certain way, and tend to find a comfort zone that works for us. Does this make sense?

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9 hours ago, MichiganBob said:

IMy financial planner said that a lot of retirees have big ideas the first year or so about doing really cool, far out, expensive things, but ultimately we are what we are, wired a certain way, and tend to find a comfort zone that works for us. Does this make sense?

That sounds about right. My retirement gig with my wife involves a travel business that skews toward the wealthy, so it may not be entirely representative of the world at large. However, what I’ve seen is that what has fueled you throughout your working years will largely be what fuels you in your retirement…at least as long as you’re physically capable. 

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This  thread has make me thing about retirement more and now I'm wondering about it from another angle; not what I do but what I don't do.

 

I don't have to get up at a certain time, be somewhere, look nice, shave, be around people I do not care for, listen to people go on and on, take my work home or on vacation, work at night and weekends to get reports completed or papers graded, mentally think about work ... how's that for a starter. So maybe retirement is all about a new form of freedom.

 

MB

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A long time ago, a friend told me "Working at this place is like riding a donkey with two saddlebags. One is being filled with gold, the other with shit. When you donkey collapses under the weight, or falls to one side or the other, it's time to get off your ass."

 

About 2 weeks on the road to Alaska in 2006, I thought to myself, "Why am I working 50 hours/week, when I could be doing this?" I knew that a new director of libraries would be taking over at Emory University the day after I returned from Alaska. I told myself that if we bonded, I would work for as long as I was welcome, otherwise, I would take early retirement at the end of 2008. We didn't, I did. I had met all my professional and monetary goals, and decided that my donkey had collapsed.

 

My biggest concern for retirement was intellectual rot. A year in, I joined the Chromebook pilot project, and spent much of the next decade answering user questions and helping solve problems. It was intellectually stimulating. I dropped out after Google dropped "Don't be evil" from their company mission statement.

 

My mother will turn 100 on September 4. I filed for a guardianship last spring, which was awarded on June 10. Guardian responsibilities are eating me alive. I don't want to be a PITA and live as long as she has.

 

I'm still riding, but less and less, especially this year. 

 

 

 

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I just retired in April. To preface what I am currently doing, it started three years ago. I felt divinely inspired to get back into music and playing my drums. This after a long break to make money and have a "career." Before that "career" I had a great deal of direction towards music but kept talking myself out of it. Back to three years ago I started studying and practicing a lot. When I retired I increased my practicing, have written a drum instruction book for the intermediate drum set player, am researching online teaching, creating my own website, in the process of copyrighting the book, have created a quiet drum practice pad so also looking to get a patent, and figuring out the best payment methods to use online for selling and teaching. But that said, I spend the first 1/2 of my day with the above and the second 1/2 doing tasks around the house. Mrs. Sonor is still working and will be for at least a year. So no major travel plans at this time. Now the best parts of my situation: 1, I worked for the state and have a pension and health insurance so I feel as though I am being paid to be a musician. As my best friend says, "You got the golden ticket." 2, Not only did I retire from something that I grew to dislike (the place and management, not the people), but I went TO something as well as away from something.


So life is good!!! I now put over 100 miles a week on the bike during low traffic times and in the country plus have started to work out again in my garage. Again, life is good.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Mike, hope to run into you in Tuscany.  My wife and I will be riding around Italy in Sept. 

I retired a few years back the day before my 60th birthday.  The fun began with an 8 week retirement celebration trip including a long ride with Australian friends through the South Island of New Zealand.  I haven't looked back since.  I do all the renovation and maintenance on our house, property, equipment and vehicles so there is always something new to learn.  Then there are my daughter's and son's properties too so no lack of physical and mental challenges.  Over the winter I did the full list of maintenance work (hall sensor, brake lines, valves, splines...) on my 2002 RT.   I was hoping to ship her to Europe but it's not easy to do that this year...   With Covid affecting travel I bought and older GSA last year,  switched over to adventure riding which was a something completely new.  I was tired of running into these amazing dirt roads up on the Quebec side from us and not being able to fully enjoy them (although the old RT was competent it's just not meant for that).  I took some training to learn proper riding techniques which made all the difference and opened up a whole new world of motorcycling and more nice people.   Now that travel is opened up (at least for the next little while), my wife and I are going to try some 2-up riding in Italy in September.   If anyone  else is heading out that way or has some "must see" suggestions from previous rides I'm all ears PM me.    Make it happen!  Happy Retirement all!   

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Hey Ray, not sure if you'll be getting to Northern Italy to ride, but if you do, the Alps in general are incredible. Lake Como is a neat area, and Stelvio Pass is considered one of the world's best driving roads, the highlight of my trip there. So many other passes that will keep your attention, the Dolomites an interesting area as well. To be honest, if we get back there, my wife says she's good on riding the big Alps, ready for some more docile landscape and getting closer to the culture and sea. For me, I would do the Alps again in a heartbeat.

Good luck, have fun!

 

A clip by Edelweiss tours, but a nice quick 2 minute overview of Stelvio Pass. Man I want to go ride it again!

https://youtu.be/aa7ZfSCVsz8

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John Ranalletta
55 minutes ago, Hosstage said:

Hey Ray, not sure if you'll be getting to Northern Italy to ride, but if you do, the Alps in general are incredible. Lake Como is a neat area, and Stelvio Pass is considered one of the world's best driving roads, the highlight of my trip there. So many other passes that will keep your attention, the Dolomites an interesting area as well. To be honest, if we get back there, my wife says she's good on riding the big Alps, ready for some more docile landscape and getting closer to the culture and sea. For me, I would do the Alps again in a heartbeat.

Good luck, have fun!

 

A clip by Edelweiss tours, but a nice quick 2 minute overview of Stelvio Pass. Man I want to go ride it again!

https://youtu.be/aa7ZfSCVsz8

 

Anyone here who's ridden Italy ever ridden in the area east of Rome toward Pescara?  My folks came from that area and maybe, maybe just maybe we'll make it over.

 

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On 8/30/2021 at 11:05 AM, John Ranalletta said:

 

Anyone here who's ridden Italy ever ridden in the area east of Rome toward Pescara?  My folks came from that area and maybe, maybe just maybe we'll make it over.

 

If you can wait a month I'll give you a full report :-)

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He was giving me some live intel at the start of the covid crisis, as we had a bike trip planned in June 2020 going from Rome to Fano.  We ended up canceling;  shocker, I know.  

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We planted a lot of bird attracting vegetation.  It now takes me about an hour and a half to have morning tea and breakfast while watching (identifying) birds, whereas when working it was gulp and out the door.  Who knew there were so many different stinking sparrows and finches?

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John Ranalletta
4 hours ago, Red said:

We planted a lot of bird attracting vegetation.  It now takes me about an hour and a half to have morning tea and breakfast while watching (identifying) birds, whereas when working it was gulp and out the door.  Who knew there were so many different stinking sparrows and finches?

 

When still in our house, we started feeding birds, were pleased with the song birds, finches, etc. but tired of the marauding sparrows that came by the hundreds.   

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On 8/30/2021 at 10:07 AM, Hosstage said:

A clip by Edelweiss tours, but a nice quick 2 minute overview of Stelvio Pass. Man I want to go ride it again!

https://youtu.be/aa7ZfSCVsz8

Thanks for that, best video I've seen of that section.  Our trip starts with a few days in Lago Maggiore and if the weather permits, a little circuit of Passo del Sempione then Stelvio and Gavia Pass although I may end up breaking that in 2 parts and possibly doing some solo while Elaine happily taking a day off.  Looks chilly up there in Brig next week with some sleet expected overnight.   After that we'll be heading down to wine country (Barolo region) and the Italian azure Coast (Finalborgo and the famous SS1) and then visit Cinque Terre a few days.   The rest of the details TBD with good input from the experts. 

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1 minute ago, RayG said:

Thanks for that, best video I've seen of that section.  Our trip starts with a few days in Lago Maggiore and if the weather permits, a little circuit of Passo del Sempione then Stelvio and Gavia Pass although I may end up breaking that in 2 parts and possibly doing some solo while Elaine happily taking a day off.  Looks chilly up there in Brig next week with some sleet expected overnight.   After that we'll be heading down to wine country (Barolo region) and the Italian azure Coast (Finalborgo and the famous SS1) and then visit Cinque Terre a few days.   The rest of the details TBD with good input from the experts. 

Sounds fantastic!

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so my slow down date (no retirement) is Dec 2023.  Starting in March 2024 it will go some thing like this.

load up the 5th wheel toy hauler with street bike and 450 dual sport

 

then make me a route of some sort

MMM in March

something in Ky or SC

START in April

Hatfield & Mccoy in May

something in Florida in late May

Something in AL or LA in June

Maybe Texas in July

head up to Colorado for June, July & August

I am guessing Torrey in there somewhere

then start heading home in late september

FART in September

work Oct - Feb 

Repeat next year

 

at least that is my plan

 

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On 9/3/2021 at 6:20 PM, randy said:

so my slow down date (no retirement) is Dec 2023.  Starting in March 2024 it will go some thing like this.

load up the 5th wheel toy hauler with street bike and 450 dual sport

 

then make me a route of some sort

MMM in March

something in Ky or SC

START in April

Hatfield & Mccoy in May

something in Florida in late May

Something in AL or LA in June

Maybe Texas in July

head up to Colorado for June, July & August

I am guessing Torrey in there somewhere

then start heading home in late september

FART in September

work Oct - Feb 

Repeat next year

 

at least that is my plan

 

I'm T-36 months til my slow down date.  In 2024, the Colorado place should be ready. 

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The question we ask before anyone retires is, "What will your sense of purpose be in retirement?" If they tell me golf or riding a bike or running, we advise them not to retire.  We live in Buffalo NY so, golf is a non-starter in December through April, unless you rent or own a home in a warmer climate, and biking and running is maybe an hour or 2 per day.  Not going to fill the day with purpose.  So before you retire, if you don't have a real hobby, you need a sense of purpose every day.  "Work expands to fill the time." so what used to take you an hour to do when you were working because of limited time becomes an "Around to it,'" project, that you can start and stop at any time.  Instead of an hour, it becomes a two day project including naps. 

My wife is talking about retirement next year, she has worked in the State system for 46 years, she is hesitating because she doesn't know what her purpose will be.  I am still working because I can't answer that question and I love my profession.  We are both in our 70s and do not need more money, have great health, and  we have more than we could ever spend and we set up all our Legacy plans. We travel whenever we want, have helped our kids and grandkids, supported charities, etc. .  I have many clients in the same boat, love their work, don't know what to do in retirement that creates a sense of purpose and have more money than they know what to do with and no where to spend it. So they keep working, they never developed a hobby to fill their day, "After all, one said, how much wooden furniture at this point in our lives do we need?"  The irony of this is that I speak nationally about retirement income distribution strategies, guide clients into retirement from a financial perspective, am working on a book and have written numerous position papers on the subject. Longevity is changing the parameters quite a bit.  We know approximately within certain parameters when you might retire, we have no idea, because of improved medicines etc.  when you will die, so we plan now to age 100, used to be mid 90's,  so you may well be retired 30-35+ years. That is a long time to be sitting in a chair and keeping up with inflation, medical expenses and income demands.  Retirement has stages, the "Go-Go years, the Slow-Go years and the No-go years, most of us are in the "Go-Go years," we need to maximize our experiences in those years and keep exercising so we can enjoy our later lives. 

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I was not planning on living this long, that is no exaggeration. I have lived much longer than my parents, 3 out of 4 grandparents, aunts, uncle's, etc. So, now I have to figure out if and when I might retire. Probably should have planned a little better. But then, long term plans were never my specialty, more of a "enjoy it while you can, things will work out" kind of guy. So far so good!

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1 hour ago, Hosstage said:

I was not planning on living this long, that is no exaggeration.

When clients tell me that, I always ask them to write down their date of death.  I also ask them to sign it, that way we can plan  their estates to the penny. If they miss and need to order cases of cat food because they ran out of money, it's on them.  To date, no one, who was not terminal, has taken me up on the offer. 

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13 hours ago, Patallaire said:

What will your sense of purpose be in retirement

I agree with Patallaire....I have a slightly different twist.  I have been retired now for 2 1/2 years.  I'm loving every day.  I dont know if I call it a sense of purpose or just my plan.  I had planned well financially so that was never the issue...although is sure was hard mentally to walk away from the income/bonus/stock/, but financially that was not an issue.  What was important for me as a Type A is to not stay a type A.  I needed to gear down.  High stress job, long hours, lost holidays- weekends-vacations-etc.  Always working because it was important for my role.  I had to get away from that and do what I call.......Get my life back.  All the things many of you do here I couldn't.  I couldn't take off for a week and be away from the phone, the pc, the job.  When I was on vacation with the family it meant I was watching them have fun while I was continuously attending this high stress meeting and this high stress call this important customer.  I had lived that life for decades and it was exciting but hard.

 

I got my life back when I retired.  No more calendar, no more alarm clock, no more talk to the analyst, no more quarter to quarter, etc.  Just me getting to do what I liked to do when I liked to do it.  I have hobbies...things I wanted to do but couldn't.  As posted earlier I sold toys I no longer used like a big boat, an airplane, and some property.  I'm free....Now I can ride my bike, I can fish when I want, I can work on things for fun like my new fishing boat, the motorcycle, my fishing gear, and things around the house.

 

My best advice truly...get your financial house in order.  Make sure you can do it comfortably.  It will take more than you think.  Be sure you have zero debt...no credit card, loans, mortgage, etc.  Then and only then make sure as Patallaire says ( my paraphrased) have a plan to stay busy most days....no everyday but at least 3-4 days a week. Reconnect with old friends and family.  Go see them.  Invite them to come see you and spend time together.  Have hobbies that will last a life time and not age out because you can't handle it anymore.  Plan without Social Security as who knows what will happen there.  Then if you can:

 

Make it financially without altering your lifestyle

Have hobbies and other interest to keep you busy 70% of the time and are sustainable into your 90's

Have your health in order...

 

Then do it.  Don't wait too long and regret like I did and don't go out so soon you end up a ward of the state.

 

Good luck to you all....  Retirement is the 2nd best decision of my life.

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11 hours ago, Hosstage said:

I was not planning on living this long, that is no exaggeration. I have lived much longer than my parents, 3 out of 4 grandparents, aunts, uncle's, etc. So, now I have to figure out if and when I might retire. Probably should have planned a little better. But then, long term plans were never my specialty, more of a "enjoy it while you can, things will work out" kind of guy. So far so good!

 

I rarely check my "check stub", 'cause I really don't want to know what I take home, 'cause, I will spend what I know I have to play with.  My wife managers all my money/income.

 

so this one day, I happened to be on our company site checking my pay stub.  My buddy walks in, he's been here a couple of years less than me and is a couple of levels lower than me.  He sees my bi-weekly pay and ask "is that all you make, I bring home more than that",....I replied, "I have 20% going into my 401k",.....he says "ohhhhh",......I actually take home less now than when I started.  My 401k is at 25% now and YTD at 21% return,.....of course,.......last year sucked.

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10 hours ago, Patallaire said:

When clients tell me that, I always ask them to write down their date of death. To date, no one, who was not terminal, has taken me up on the offer. 

Don't rush me, I'm thinking!

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When I evaluate retirement for clients, they proudly show or tell me their Net Worth, and in my opinion, with a few exceptions, they should be proud. On the other~hand, what they have is what they have, and if it is important to them, and they feel good about it, then it's important to me and we will work to make it work for them.  What I stress, is that it is not about the pile of money you own, its about what cash flow it will allow.  So to David's point, eliminating debt goes a long way to enjoying a lifestyle and allows for more cash flow to do with as you please. This also allows flexibility, if your portfolio dropped 40% and you had no debt you could adjust your lifestyle down proportionately, if you had debt, you have less ability to make that adjustment. For those still accumulating, it's not what you make that is important, it's what you keep that is important. So as we age, saving more is better. When you retire whatever you have needs to support you for 30-35 years,  Social Security will help, but not enough, Pensions will help, but today fewer and fewer people have them.  Retirement is about planning and execution of the plan with a bunch of unknowns. Life expectancy, inflation, markets, health, interest rates, expenses, etc. Plan today for your financial tomorrows.

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