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Buying my first BMW...an R1150RT...sitting for 3 years need some guidance please


Kilohertz

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Kilohertz

Hello all,

 

My friend has been trying to get me to buy a BMW bike for a few years, and I have decided that the RxxxxRT is the bike for me. I have looked at a few but this one was brought to my attention as it needs some work and I am very mechanically inclined and like working on projects and it will be at a reduced price. I have worked on lots of carb'd bikes but this will be my first foray into FI (on bikes).

 

So the bike is a '03 R1150RT with a 140,000KM, one owner, was maintained at BMW dealer for the first 13 years of it's life, after that, local small town shop. . It has been sitting for 3 years without any attention. It currently turns over but won't start, I'm sure the fuel is foul and will need to be drained and such, but I am wondering about other things to watch out for on this vintage bike. I have read a fair bit about these and have a basic understanding of them. I had a quick look at it today, cosmetically could be better, mirrors are both in need of new mounts, needs new battery, tires, (new ones come with it)  the paint is chipped all over..I can see the beauty under the surface crud and I am a painter so a refinish won't be a problem.

 

I guess I just need some guidance on what to ask/watch out for on these, and how hard is it to clean out the fuel system and injectors.

 

Appreciate any guidance.


Cheers

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dirtrider
6 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

Hello all,

 

My friend has been trying to get me to buy a BMW bike for a few years, and I have decided that the RxxxxRT is the bike for me. I have looked at a few but this one was brought to my attention as it needs some work and I am very mechanically inclined and like working on projects and it will be at a reduced price. I have worked on lots of carb'd bikes but this will be my first foray into FI (on bikes).

 

So the bike is a '03 R1150RT with a 140,000KM, one owner, was maintained at BMW dealer for the first 13 years of it's life, after that, local small town shop. . It has been sitting for 3 years without any attention. It currently turns over but won't start, I'm sure the fuel is foul and will need to be drained and such, but I am wondering about other things to watch out for on this vintage bike. I have read a fair bit about these and have a basic understanding of them. I had a quick look at it today, cosmetically could be better, mirrors are both in need of new mounts, needs new battery, tires, (new ones come with it)  the paint is chipped all over..I can see the beauty under the surface crud and I am a painter so a refinish won't be a problem.

 

I guess I just need some guidance on what to ask/watch out for on these, and how hard is it to clean out the fuel system and injectors.

 

Appreciate any guidance.


Cheers

Morning  Kilohertz

 

At that mileage & that condition that motorcycle better be REAL CHEAP. 

 

With a BMW boxer motorcycle that has that many miles & has been sitting that long look for everything, look for mouse damage on the wiring, look for transmission input shaft spline damage (difficult to tell this without starter removal), look for the final drive crown bearing being loose (grab rear wheel & try to rock it), look for shocks seeping oil, look for rotted out muffler insides, look for corrosion damage, look for sticking brakes (will probably need new brake hoses anyhow),   look for front & rear master cylinders seeping after using brakes a  few times, _____front to rear top to bottom look at EVERYTHING

 

You didn't say what country that you are in but if E-10 gasoline was prevalent in your area then your fuel system (inside the fuel tank) will probably be a real mess. A quick sniff of the insides of the fuel tank will probably tell you if you have rotten fuel in it. 

 

The fuel tank is plastic so that will probably OK but the internal hoses (those are not cheap as they are special) might all need replacing.   The fuel pump & the pump pass-through assembly might be a corroded mess & need to be replaced. (you won't know any of this until you take it apart).

 

Not much  else to tell you as you really don't know what was wrong with that motorcycle before it was stored  so there might be something wrong from before the storage. You won't know how much fuel system damage until you get into that (BMW fuel system parts are not cheap).

 

Again we don't know what country you are in so don't know the availability of BMW boxer bikes in your area but finding a running motorcycle that you can test ride is probably the best  advise unless BMW boxer bikes are just not available in your country.  

 

     

  • Like 1
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Kilohertz

Thanks for the reply...I found the service manual and am starting to read up on how the bike works.

 

I'm in BC, Canada. It was running/driving just fine when it was parked, so hopefully just needs thorough going thru and clean up, all fluids, brake lines etc. 

 

I have looked at a few that were in much better condition and running well, but were much more $$, over double.

 

Thanks again.

 

cheers

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Kilohertz
18 hours ago, dirtrider said:

Morning  Kilohertz

 

At that mileage & that condition that motorcycle better be REAL CHEAP. 

 

 

 

So I'm not sure where you are either, but what would be REAL CHEAP for this bike, in whatever currency you know?

 

thanks

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dirtrider
6 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

 

So I'm not sure where you are either, but what would be REAL CHEAP for this bike, in whatever currency you know?

 

thanks

Morning  Kilohertz

 

In my area of the U.S. older BMW 1150RT's are not difficult to find, many with much lower mileage & in better condition. 

 

With that being said (personally) I probably wouldn't buy an 1150RT with 87,000 miles, obvious paint damage (shows last few owners lack of care) , possible expensive fueling problems, plus possible other unknown problems that I couldn't tell as the bike won't start, run, or ride-out.

 

But if for some reason I would try to buy a similar motorcycle in my area I wouldn't offer more than $1000.00 US dollars & even that would take some soul searching to make that high of an offer due to knowing the possible pitfalls  in getting it running & fully operational again. 

 

Even then I probably wouldn't even make an offer until I verified possible transmission input shaft spline wear  as that would turn it into a MUCH larger money pit involving WAY more work than I would want to put into a motorcycle in that condition. 

 

Now in an area where older BMW 1150's are difficult to come by then that might make a difference on offer price. 

 

Just don't let the "I want a BMW motorcycle"  cloud your common sense on this deal. Figure out how many things COULD be wrong, what the repair parts would cost, what you will end up with, & the hours of labor involved, (then triple your labor time estimate) as that will probably be closer to what you will have in it labor wise.     

 

  

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Kilohertz

Dirtrider,

 

Thank you for the detailed description of the situation, much appreciated. I am not in a hurry, I have 2 Viragos already to ride, I might just hold off and find a better example. I have looked at a few, R1100RT 80,000km much better condition, sold for $2900, another 1100RT 67,000km I looked at, $3500, guy changed his mind about selling it while I was there :4607:  The one R1150RT I currently am looking at I offered $1500, waiting for a reply now.  Comes with new tires and battery. There are  a few out there with low kms and in great condition but are $4K-$6K and a days drive away, and beyond my budget.  This one I thought I may be able to get into cheaper and get going and experience the BMW for a while...could always sell it and get a nicer one if I decide it's the model bike for me.

 

Again, appreciate your input. I am now studying the service manual to see how this bike works.

 

cheers!

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Miguel!

Its just my sense from reading this forum for a couple years but it seems like most people on the forum recommend getting the bikes toward the end of the model life rather than the earlier models because most of the bugs and engineering kinks have been worked out by BMW over the life cycle of the bike. Neither the previous owner nor I have had any major problems with my well-maintained 2001 R1100RT, which was the last year for the R1100RT, with a bit over 111,000 miles on it. Just my observations.

 

Cheers. Miguel

  • Like 1
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Warren Dean
3 hours ago, Miguel! said:

Its just my sense from reading this forum for a couple years but it seems like most people on the forum recommend getting the bikes toward the end of the model life rather than the earlier models because most of the bugs and engineering kinks have been worked out by BMW over the life cycle of the bike. Neither the previous owner nor I have had any major problems with my well-maintained 2001 R1100RT, which was the last year for the R1100RT, with a bit over 111,000 miles on it. Just my observations.

 

Cheers. Miguel

 

The R1100RT was the last of the BMWs, in my opinion, that are easily worked on and maintained by the owner. After that it seems that the complexity ramped up. As much as I love BMW motorcycles, I do not care to own anything later than the 1100RT. I can can do all my own maintenance and repairs on it because it is a simple design and bulletproof. 

 

And it's the best looking BMW in decades.  :)

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dirtrider
6 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

  This one I thought I may be able to get into cheaper and get going and experience the BMW for a while...could always sell it and get a nicer one if I decide it's the model bike for me.

 

Again, appreciate your input. I am now studying the service manual to see how this bike works.

 

 

Afternoon  Kilohertz

 

Just try to pick the correct BMW so you don't experience the money pit side of owning a BMW motorcycle. 

 

Also keep in mind the BMW service manual is meant for a quick reference for technicians that have a very good base understanding of the BMW motorcycle. They do a poor job of explaining the basics on how things works as they weren't designed with that aspect in mind.  

 

 

  • Like 1
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chrisolson
4 hours ago, Miguel! said:

Its just my sense from reading this forum for a couple years but it seems like most people on the forum recommend getting the bikes toward the end of the model life rather than the earlier models because most of the bugs and engineering kinks have been worked out by BMW over the life cycle of the bike. Neither the previous owner nor I have had any major problems with my well-maintained 2001 R1100RT, which was the last year for the R1100RT, with a bit over 111,000 miles on it. Just my observations.

 

Cheers. Miguel

 

1 hour ago, Warren Dean said:

 

The R1100RT was the last of the BMWs, in my opinion, that are easily worked on and maintained by the owner. After that it seems that the complexity ramped up. As much as I love BMW motorcycles, I do not care to own anything later than the 1100RT. I can can do all my own maintenance and repairs on it because it is a simple design and bulletproof. 

 

And it's the best looking BMW in decades.  :)

 

An enthusiastic :5188:

 

I would still like to have my '99 back as I think it was the best all around bike I've owned (and yeah I like the older look also )

 

If I was in the market I'd definitely look for a 2000 or 2001 R1100RT ,  but they seem to be rare on the market ...  maybe because those who own them know what they've got :cool:

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Kilohertz

Wow lots of activity today while I was at work.

 

I received a phone call from the owner with a reply to my offer...and he said he's not selling it now.  :4607:  Because it's the only bike he has which his wife likes riding on...so I was saved by the owner...

 

I can now pursue the R1100RT...I too agree it's a nice looking bike. I missed a '96 here a few weeks ago for $2900, really nice shape...based on the discussion here today, I think I will focus on the '99-2001, see what I can find.

 

Yes, the factory SM is nothing like a Clymers or Haynes...I had to hunt thru it twice to find anything about the FI system and then it ws only about 2 pages of info.

 

Thanks guys for all the help...I'll start a new thread when I find my bike...in the meantime, I still have my Viragos.

 

Cheers

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CMikeWil
17 hours ago, Warren Dean said:

 

The R1100RT was the last of the BMWs, in my opinion, that are easily worked on and maintained by the owner. After that it seems that the complexity ramped up. As much as I love BMW motorcycles, I do not care to own anything later than the 1100RT. I can can do all my own maintenance and repairs on it because it is a simple design and bulletproof. 

 

And it's the best looking BMW in decades.  :)

Iyyyyaaaaa…okay, you might have a point!  I’ll allow that my 04 is messier to work on/maintain.

 

Boy, those were really good looking bikes(both the 1100 & 1150 series).  Would I take a current/previous generation RT if pressed? Yes, of course; by all accounts they are purported to be terrific bikes.  But, BMW sure had something right with this series.

 

I know we’ll never see it again, but wouldn’t you love spec out an 1100 or 1150 series bike with just a few of the current day essentials?  I’d certainly take cruise(and by necessity, the ride-by-wire technology it requires) and maybe some iteration of a TFT display, but oh how I could do without some of the other electronics.  I could also do without PAYING for those items and potentially the dealer repair someday down the road.

 

For the record…the ABS on my bike & future generations absolutely DO make me a safer rider and I have no quibbles with that.  Granted, if my ABS unit should go out in spite of my annual ritual of maintenance, the repair costs will likely exceed the value of my bike.  

 

  • Like 2
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In your price range.... 1999-2001 R1100RT. :classic_love:

 

 

If I could find one I've have it just 'cause..........

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dirtrider
1 hour ago, CMikeWil said:

 

I know we’ll never see it again, but wouldn’t you love spec out an 1100 or 1150 series bike with just a few of the current day essentials?  I’d certainly take cruise(and by necessity, the ride-by-wire technology it requires) and maybe some iteration of a TFT display, but oh how I could do without some of the other electronics.  I could also do without PAYING for those items and potentially the dealer repair someday down the road.

 

Afternoon  CMikeWil

 

I have heard those same words over & over again since the 1150 went away. Even said them myself before I owned later model BMW boxer bikes. 

 

But those words don't seem to be repeated  once a BMW rider starts riding the later model BMW boxer bike. 

 

The newer BMW boxer bikes run so much better, stop so much better, have cruise control available, have better thought out & usable transmission gear ratios, ride smoother, & definitely a better feeling motorcycle at over 100 mph.

 

I still ride my older 1100/1150 motorcycles for short rides & some daily duty but if I going somewhere (especially if I plan on riding the freeway then it is hands down the later boxer bikes). 

 

 

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CMikeWil
3 hours ago, dirtrider said:

Afternoon  CMikeWil

 

I have heard those same words over & over again since the 1150 went away. Even said them myself before I owned later model BMW boxer bikes. 

 

But those words don't seem to be repeated  once a BMW rider starts riding the later model BMW boxer bike. 

 

The newer BMW boxer bikes run so much better, stop so much better, have cruise control available, have better thought out & usable transmission gear ratios, ride smoother, & definitely a better feeling motorcycle at over 100 mph.

 

I still ride my older 1100/1150 motorcycles for short rides & some daily duty but if I going somewhere (especially if I plan on riding the freeway then it is hands down the later boxer bikes). 

 

 

Dirtrider,

 

:-)

 

I cannot tell a lie!  My late model R1200GS sitting in the garage has been rock solid dependable so far and will run rings around my 04 RT.

 

Like you, I do find that I’m riding the newer bike far more frequently that my older RT. I’m just being obstinate because, well…because!

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Tom in Vernon BC

Hoho!  Small world.

 

No, my RTP isn't for sale... unless I'm offered a stupidly ridiculous price!  What I usually tell people is that... we hates it 'til we rides it.

 

You've probably seen the white pig around town.

 

From your handle, I suspect we might share a similar interest.  I'll shoot you a PM.

 

Tom 7DQ

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Warren Dean
On 6/14/2021 at 1:46 AM, Tom in Vernon BC said:

 

From your handle, I suspect we might share a similar interest. 

 

Tom 7DQ

That probably makes at least 3 of us.  :)   73

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Kilohertz
6 hours ago, Warren Dean said:

That probably makes at least 3 of us.  :)   73

 

Yes, VE7KHz.

 

73

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Tom in Vernon BC

It's what we do!

 

I haven't found working on the '04 to be difficult; just tedious.  Being a ex-motor bike, when there's work to be done, I start at the rear fender and start stripping off the crash bar hardware and the tupperware until I get to the front fender.  The largest difficulty I have is just finding space for all the take-off stuff in my single-bay-full-to-the-gunwales 'shop'.

 

I've done all the usual stuff... clutch, brakes and brake lines, servo-ectomy, alternator mod, AFXEID (?), injectors, tires, etc.  The only thing I haven't done myself was paint, cuz I don't have a suitable booth... yet.

 

Would I like a newer RT?  Sure, but in reality, I probably have only a few more years of riding left in me and I have much time, money, blood and emotion  invested in this pig.

 

Hi, Miguel!  My motor was an Oxnard City bike purchased in Northridge privately 10 years ago.  Some of the maintenance might have been done at Irv Seaver BMW, as it had a Seaver licence plate surround on it.  I'd like to do a nostalgic road trip down that way soon.

 

Warren; looked you up on the Z.  Very impressive!

 

Cheers and 73

 

Tom

VE7DQ (on HF and love CW)

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Warren Dean
2 hours ago, Tom in Vernon BC said:

 

Warren; looked you up on the Z.  Very impressive!

 

Cheers and 73

 

Tom

VE7DQ (on HF and love CW)

Thanks, Tom. We should probably start another thread or use PMs so we don't hijack this one.

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Kilohertz

Well I'm going to hijack my own thread...well kind of..

 

I found a '99 R1100S with 100,000km, looks like its in good shape. I think basically the same engine, chassis topology is similar...It comes with hard shell panniers. My concern would be it's a little more sporty, lean forwardish, might not be the case once I sit on it.

 

What are your thoughts on this version of the R1100?

 

Thanks

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dirtrider
5 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

Well I'm going to hijack my own thread...well kind of..

 

I found a '99 R1100S with 100,000km, looks like its in good shape. I think basically the same engine, chassis topology is similar...It comes with hard shell panniers. My concern would be it's a little more sporty, lean forwardish, might not be the case once I sit on it.

 

What are your thoughts on this version of the R1100?

 

Thanks

Morning  Kilohertz

 

That is a difficult question to answer. 

 

The 1100S is a bit of an outlier, it is similar to the other BMW 1100/1150 motorcycles but is a bit of an outlier with some (many) differences, some parts are more difficult to find. They are just enough different to be a real pain at times.

 

The 1100S can be a vey nice motorcycle but you probably want to start with one that is complete & everything working as it should. 

 

A non ABS 1100S is probably a better choice due to a less complex design, if you can find one.  

 

I don't know what the 1100S parts choices are in Canada but importing used S parts from the USA might add some expense & complexity to owning the (S) model. 

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Lowndes
On 6/23/2021 at 1:25 AM, Kilohertz said:

Well I'm going to hijack my own thread...well kind of..

 

I found a '99 R1100S with 100,000km, looks like its in good shape. I think basically the same engine, chassis topology is similar...It comes with hard shell panniers. My concern would be it's a little more sporty, lean forwardish, might not be the case once I sit on it.

 

What are your thoughts on this version of the R1100?

 

Thanks

 

Hey, Kilohertz,

 

I bought a "99 R1100S five years ago, still have it.  My "first true luv" getting back into riding after 30+ years without.   It's a really good bike, looks good, easy to service by YOU, and a blast to ride.   There are several other members on here that have or have had the R11S, too.

 

As Dirtrider said, it's a bit of an "outlier", but not too much.  The engine seems to have more parts in common with the  R1150 engines, 6 speed trans is the biggest and the best difference.  I have not found that parts are that difficult to find here, but don't know about in Canada.  Lots of these bikes still out there.  BBY and EME still have all the maintenance stuff.  They LOOK kinda sporty but in reality they are really tame with only 82 HP on the dyno.  I did everything I could (bolt-on parts) to get it going better/faster, AFXieD being the best and cheapest improvement, with InDuct, EV14 injectors, San Jose Airbox, LED's, Rocket Sprokets (never installed), Wilbur shocks  (the handling is absolutely stellar with the Wilburs, btw), plus the regular  R1100 stuff like SS brake and clutch lines, HES,  windshield, slave cyl weep hole, AGM, fuel filter and lines, etc.  Never had to replace any tupperware but it's out there.  Bought the BMW saddlebags and mounts on eBay (there were several models of BMW's that had interchangeable cases).

 

The riding position can be easily improved (for free) for a more upright position by moving the "clip-on" type bars to the top of the tripple clamp (and moving the tubes up the 1.5 inches, to make this possible.  All the wires, hoses and cables will reach, in fact the later years production came with the bars in this position.  It does NOT affect the handling, just your position.

 

It really depends on the type of riding you do and like.  If I am doing long highway miles in weather, my '99 RT is the choice - for the protection.  Carrying a bunch of gear to the mountains for a few days of riding the twisties at FART or START trying to keep up with those krazies, it will be my '00 K1200RS aka "checker cab", "flying brick", "electric jet".  For a light day trip, the R1100S feels like a bicycle  (a very comfortable and powerful bicycle) after that 650 lb K bike.

 

Lowndes

 

 

 

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Kilohertz

Lowndes,

 

Thank you for the very inciteful description of the bikes, you have 3, very cool. I'd be happy with one (for now :-)  )

 

Well, I have been riding cruisers all my life, Viragos, Shadows, never a sport bike or a touring bike...but as I age and my butt gets bigger the thought of a comfy seat able to support my 6'2" 250lb frame is looking more and more desirable.  I haven't ridden at all in over 14 years (street, still ride dirt with my son when we are camping)  I have sat on a few R1100/1150 RTs but have yet to test ride one. The R1100S looks like it would be  good bike for me, for right now. I won't be trekking across the country for a few more years, just local day trips, maybe 200-400km. Overnight type trips. And I don't mind having a few bikes in the stable...I have 2 Viragos currently.

 

I am very mechanically inclined and would have no problem diving into whatever issue the bike would throw at me..my current XV1100 Virago was owned by someone who should not be allowed to operate machinery, let alone a screwdriver...so many stripped threads and things that just make you say WTH was he thinking. I have fixed most of them...probably still more lurking which I will hopefully never find.

 

Anyway, still searching...I am scheduled to see the R1100S this Saturday morning...hoping it's nice.

 

Thanks again.

 

Cheers

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Lowndes

Kilohertz,

 

Things to look for on the R1100S:

 

Aftermarket seat, Corbin, Sargent, Russell are the most common.  ANYTHING but the OEM seat.

 

Shocks (both) - the OEM Showa units will be long gone at  100K km.  Ohlins, Wilbur, or others

 

Brake lines should be the braided SS, not the black rubber OEM (you can fix that - easy 1 day job, if not already done)

 

Replaced/rewired HES (Hall Effect sender) - the wiring is not heat resistant and the insulation gets old and crumbles shorting out the HES.  You can't readily see the fix but maybe there are records of it.

 

Tires - date code - not older than 5-7 years regardless of the tread left.

 

"The SPLINES" - some of these bikes had a trans input shaft spline issue (stripping), usually at about 30-40 K miles (50K km).  Since this bike is twice that, it would have been either fixed, or it was not succeptable to this problem (most weren't, and mine was not).  Might be records of this, too.

 

One good thing about the R11S is that it is very simple, no electronics (except fuel injection ECU), but no fancy stuff, not even a fuel gauge.  Valve settings, brake pads, TB sync, spark plugs, oil (engine, trans, final drive) is about it for maintenance.

 

 

Good luck!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
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Kilohertz

Thanks again. Here is a picture of it..not sure what you can tell from it??

 

cheers

 

https://c.castanet.net/img/311/large/4487524-2-1.jpg

 

https://c.castanet.net/img/311/large/4487524-5-1.jpg

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dirtrider
5 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

Thanks again. Here is a picture of it..not sure what you can tell from it??

 

Afternoon Kilohertz   

 

That motorcycle has a speed sensor tone ring so it has ABS, that also has the more complicated electronic speedometer. 

 

It also looks like it has a front fender extender (shows that a previous owner took care to protect the front of engine)

 

That is a nice looking S bike, I always liked the looks of the BMW 1100S.  

  • Like 1
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Lowndes

THAT is a GREAT looking R11S!!

 

That cover on the passenger seat is hard to come by now as they had a tendency to get lost and/or come off while riding.  And that might be a Corbin or Sargent seat as the OEM didn't have seams or piping.

 

It looks like the cat may have been replaced with a straight-thru pipe.  Check on that, the O2 sensor, and the cans as they are sometimes replaced with very similar but louder aftermarket units.

 

Can't see the rear shock from the left side.  If it is a fancy gold thing with a side mounted reservoir its most likely an Ohlins unit (and that's good, if it doesn't have too many miles on it).  Can't see the front unit without a flashlight and looking up her nose.

 

Looks like the brake and clutch lines are OEM.  Really should be repaced.

 

You might want to protect the heads/valve covers with some low profile guards like these (just below the spark plug cover):

 

ACtC-3fQ_jN12jERLkf8ipOOjgqr7UWrPisshq8a

 

And here:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/99-BMW-R1100-R1100S-Right-Valve-Cover-Guard-S3R-/154150025616  

 

Be sure to check that right side head/valve cover for any damage, too.  "Trust, but verify."

 

Let us know what you find tomorrow!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
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Kilohertz

Thanks everyone for the guidance...I just had a nice phone chat with the owner and I will give you the details and you can comment as you please.

 

So yes, it's a Zednick exhaust, but he has the original as well with it, new front tire not mounted yet. Corbin seat but still has original, original shocks and clutch, he is the second owner and had it since 2007 when it had 35,000km. Newish front brakes, original hoses, and as mentioned ABS. Didn't sound like the splines had been lubed but ny now, maybe it's not an issue. He bought it from a BMW dealer.


That's it. Heading out in the morning before it gets too hot...may tow it home on my trailer if I can make a deal. Not sure what to offer...I know every market is different. I have seen lower mileage, higher optioned RTs go for $2700-$3000 cdn here, asking on this is $3500 cdn, we'll see.

 

Thanks again for all the guidance.

 

Cheers

 

https://c.castanet.net/img/311/large/4487524-3-1.jpg

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Lowndes

RT's "generally" go for less than S's (partly because there are many more RT's than S's out there).  

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dirtrider
13 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

Thanks everyone for the guidance...I just had a nice phone chat with the owner and I will give you the details and you can comment as you please.

 

So yes, it's a Zednick exhaust, but he has the original as well with it, new front tire not mounted yet. Corbin seat but still has original, original shocks and clutch, he is the second owner and had it since 2007 when it had 35,000km. Newish front brakes, original hoses, and as mentioned ABS. Didn't sound like the splines had been lubed but ny now, maybe it's not an issue. He bought it from a BMW dealer.


That's it. Heading out in the morning before it gets too hot...may tow it home on my trailer if I can make a deal. Not sure what to offer...I know every market is different. I have seen lower mileage, higher optioned RTs go for $2700-$3000 cdn here, asking on this is $3500 cdn, we'll see.

 

Thanks again for all the guidance.

 

Cheers

 

 

Afternoon  Kilohertz

 

That doesn't seem to be a real bad price ($3500 cdn) as that is about ($2850.00 US). Difficult to tell all from online pictures but if that bike is as nice as it looks in the pictures that pre 2001 1100S would probably go for around  $3000.00 to $4000.00 in my area. The side cases (even though ugly on an 1100S) do add some additional value. 

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Kilohertz

So yes, she followed me home yesterday, :4322: a beautiful drive home in the sunshine along the lake, about a 4 hour round trip strapped to the trailer behind my dump truck.

 

So just quickly as I am out of town visiting my Dad, it's a beautiful bike, very clean and tidy and runs like a charm. Can't even hear or feel it go into gear. As it wasn't insured and he lives on a busy street I was unable to take any further than the driveway but I will get to try it today when I get home. As previously mentioned, has an aftermarket exhaust, starts with a Z can't recall the name, Corbin seat, full tool kit under the seat, oil filter tool and full Clymer manual. The only potential problem I see the back wheel has ding in it, npt bent, just like a curb hit, he says it doesn't affect the ride but I may look for a good used one just to be safe. Also gave me a full on 2 piece insulated riding suit, smart battery charger, the original seat and exhaust and a new Michelin front tire unmounted. He accepted my first offer of $1000 off the asking so I was very pleased to have some extra  in case it needs anything.

 

More later after I get home and take her for a proper ride.

 

Cheers

 

IMG_0153.thumb.JPG.62242a1242243b08eb18a992aba37b4e.JPG

IMG_0154.thumb.JPG.6a6723cf9a3330d4bd3126c1f980a0c7.JPGIMG_0159.thumb.JPG.7c4b2159408cfc6bb3cb4c974a5366e4.JPGIMG_0166.thumb.JPG.7e4d6d623cde91ec63a77ee51067e465.JPG

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dirtrider
1 hour ago, Kilohertz said:

The only potential problem I see the back wheel has ding in it, npt bent, just like a curb hit, he says it doesn't affect the ride but I may look for a good used one just to be safe. Also gave me a full on 2 piece insulated riding suit, smart battery charger, the original seat and exhaust and a new Michelin front tire unmounted. He accepted my first offer of $1000 off the asking so I was very pleased to have some extra  in case it needs anything.

 

Afternoon  Kilohertz

 

Welcome to the BMW world. 

 

On that rear wheel, when you go looking for a rear wheel make sure to figure out what you have now as I believe the 1999 era 1100S used two different width rear wheels one was a 5" x 17" & the other was a 5.5" x 17". 

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Kilohertz

Thanks guys,

 

I forgot the post the wheel pic. Let me know if you think it is serious enough to replace. I'll try to take a better picture(s) today.IMG_0156.thumb.JPG.06f56df876b8229915e42081f64ea2fb.JPG


Thanks

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dirtrider
29 minutes ago, Kilohertz said:

Thanks guys,

 

I forgot the post the wheel pic. Let me know if you think it is serious enough to replace. I'll try to take a better picture(s) today.


Thanks

Afternoon Kilohertz

 

That has a pretty nice little gentle bend in it. You can probably ride it that way for while but you will eventually need to do something before any long trips.

 

That wheel damage pretty well eliminates spending any money on it for repair as they can remove the bend but not the damage. 

 

The BMW 1150 wheels are pretty soft alloy so you could probably dismount the tire, then support the rim inner casting on piece of hardwood then use a large rubber or rawhide mallet to beat it back pretty straight.   

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dirtrider

Afternoon Kilohertz

 

If you now have the 5" rear wheel, or don't care if you go to the narrower 5" rear wheel if you have the optional 5.5" now,  you can more easily find the 5" rear wheel as it is the same as the 1150RT uses.   

  • Like 1
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Kilohertz

 

I went out for my first trip on my new bike and it works great! Shifts nice and smooth, handles great.....comfort? What comfort? Hands were asleep in 5 minutes...This is my first lean forward bike and it was a big switch from my cruisers. I'm 6'2" and 34" leg. I am currently researching the "raise the handle bars" option, need to spend some time looking at my bike and what has been done by other 1100S owners. I know I can raise the stock  bars somewhat, and I think I have concluded that there were 2 different bars from the factory, high bars and low bars, and there is a way to mount them above the triple tree...need to figure that out as well. Otherwise, I like it so far, tons of power, great brakes....it was just too hot to go much further than 10km...it's 41C here today...and getting hotter later in the week. If I had strapped a roast to the front of the bike it would have been done by the time I got home.

:3:

Cheers

 

IMG_0161.thumb.JPG.89d7d6922acb9ce435335b80eee4d2ee.JPG

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Lowndes

YEEHA!!

 

Good job.  We knew you could do it!!

 

It is really nice.  And you already have the low profile head covers on it.  Uh-oh, those look like the OEM black rubber brake and clutch lines coming off the bars.

 

Moving the bars to the top of the tripple clamp is really very simple and can easily be done just on the centerstand, ONLY one side at a time, and leaving all the controls, wiring and tubes in place.  The weight of the bike is on the shock spring which is connected to the sliders, not the tubes. 

 

If you don't have a torque wrench now's a good time to get one.  You want this stuff to be right.  Don't want things like fork tubes and handlebars falling off while you're out riding.

 

There is a small bolt on the bottom on each side that holds the "bar" up to the tripple clamp,   It's kinda hard to get at and get out, but you got to.  

 

Then loosten the TC pinch bolt, lets say the right side first, and then the pinch bolt on the right side "bar".  Grab the tube with you bare hands, give it a twist or two while pulling down - it should be free to come down about 1.5 inches and allow you to slip the handle "bar" off the top of the tube, but don't drop the tube, it might want to slide farther down.  When the "bar" is off the tube bring the bar up to the top of the TC, then slide the tube up thru the TC and the "bar" and flush with the top of the bar.  Snug up the pinch bolts so you can set the angle of the bars before you torque 'em down. 

 

Do the left side same way.  

 

Voila.  Nut'n to it.  

 

 

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Kilohertz

Thank you sir, you were exactly right. Took about 30 minutes to do. It sounded more complex in all the threads I had read about it. I do have torque wrenches and will probably loosen it all again this weekend and use some anti seize on the threads and torque them to spec, steel bolts and Al don't mix well.

 

I won't get to try it until tomorrow after work, but am hoping this will be my "keeper" bike. It really rides so nicely, I just need to keep my hands awake..

 

More tomorrow.

 

Thanks again!

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Lowndes

If you are still uncomfortable I have a pair of bar risers that might help.  As I remember, the stock wiring and hydraulic lines will still fit, barely.  

 

These fit on top of the TC just like you have the bars now but can be rotated (depending on the wiring and hydraulic lines) to get the grips farther apart, closer, or back, plus about 2 inches (50 mm) higher.  Some positions might interfere with the windshield or tank bag at full lock, I think.

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/QCKdU1qbGHXaaw2v9

 

image.thumb.png.e7c0bc449d430f16a9ace801e90e83f8.png

 

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dirtrider
14 hours ago, Kilohertz said:

 

I went out for my first trip on my new bike and it works great! Shifts nice and smooth, handles great.....comfort? What comfort? Hands were asleep in 5 minutes...This is my first lean forward bike and it was a big switch from my cruisers. I'm 6'2" and 34" leg. I am currently researching the "raise the handle bars" option, need to spend some time looking at my bike and what has been done by other 1100S owners. I know I can raise the stock  bars somewhat, and I think I have concluded that there were 2 different bars from the factory, high bars and low bars, and there is a way to mount them above the triple tree...need to figure that out as well. Otherwise, I like it so far, tons of power, great brakes....it was just too hot to go much further than 10km...it's 41C here today...and getting hotter later in the week. If I had strapped a roast to the front of the bike it would have been done by the time I got home.

 

Morning  Kilohertz

 

You are brand new to BMW boxer bikes, new to that 1100S, & have a cruiser background. 

 

Just move the bars to the top of upper triple tree per  Lowndes directions then ride that motorcycle at least 1000 miles. 

 

On a new & different motorcycle that is unfamiliar most riders grip the handlebars way to tightly, ride slower so not as much wind holding their upper body up, & ride unrelaxed and stiff. That all leads to hand numbness & an uncomfortable feeling.  

 

Try to not make major comfort changes until you are one with that motorcycle. (that takes time & miles). Once you are at ease with that  (S)  bike then you can make informed minor comfort adjustments as needed.  

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Kilohertz

Thanks Lowndes and Dirtrider,

 

Well you nailed it, my first ride was a little nerve racking, barely hit 90kmh, and wasn't really letting the bike do its' thing. It was also blazing hot and a fair bit of traffic. It's supposed to hit 45C today so it will have to wait until sundown, man that's hot riding. :jaw:

I'm sure I will get used to it in time...it sure is a beautiful bike.

 

cheers :beer:

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